Energy Update

Friends,

Wow… What a weekend!  Started it on Thursday night with a great Alice in Chains show at the Anthem.  Then, drove back/forth twice between UVa (Adam’s track meet Fri/Sat) and UDelaware (Olivia’s field hockey Sat/Sun), yet still managed to catch the Caps crazy win over the Pens, Saturday’s Kentucky Derby and last night’s historic victory by the Vegas Golden Knights.

The 144th Run for the Roses was muddy, but brilliant.  For those of you paying attention to my preview last week, you probably won some money as Justify rolled to victory to win the $2 million race.  Justify, was 5-2 favorite at the bell and is the 6th straight Derby favorite to win.  Justify is trained by Bob Baffert and ridden by Hall-of-Fame jockey Mike Smith.  As I mentioned, Promises Fulfilled took the early fast pace, but Justify stalked until the far turn, pulling away in deep stretch. His winning time was a slow 2 minutes, 4 1/5 seconds.  He also breaks the longest losing streak in sports history: the Apollo CurseApollo was the 1882 Kentucky Derby champion, who was the last winner before Justify not to race as a 2-year-old.  Another one of my picks Good Magic finished strong to take 2nd while Audible took 3rd.  Unfortunately, uber-longshot Instilled Regard held off the charging My Boy Jack (my mud horse) to finish out the Super, which paid out $19,618.20 if you hit it.  Justify will be a heavy favorite in the Preakness…preview next week!

ICYMI, late last week, a new economic study – The Economic Impacts of U.S. Ratification of the Kigali Amendment – from the Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy and AHRI was sent to the White House, the State Department and EPA.  The study is an outgrowth of the forum earlier this year at the Hudson Institute where former White House advisor David Banks said it was imperative to have an economic analysis of any HFC phasedown before it could move forward. The report says U.S. industry strongly supports ratification, followed by domestic implementation.

Speaking of Banks, this morning, our friends at ClearPath announced that it has added the former White House advisor along with SoCo’s Ed Holland, former NJ Utility Board Chair Richard Mroz and campaign strategist Terry Sullivan to its advisory board.  Also today, the U.S. Chamber’s Global Energy Institute (GEI) is launching a new initiative to highlight the advances that are improving our modern way of life. EnergyInnovates is a multi-platform initiative that will showcase American innovators, projects, and technologies that have shaped today’s energy landscape and will lay the groundwork for the future.

WINDPOWER starts today in Chicago.  One of the biggest, most important trade shows of the year, the event underscores the strong demand for wind energy, as evidenced by the busy 1st quarter for new U.S. wind farm announcements. Wind power’s low cost and stable energy prices motivated utility and non-utility customers to sign contracts for 3,500 megawatts (MW) of U.S. wind capacity in the first quarter of 2018, a high water mark in recent years.

This week in DC, we expected another RFS meeting at the White House likely tomorrow while Friday, the President will hold a Roundtable with automaker CEOs on fuel economy standards.  It is also a busy week on Capitol Hill with House Approps rolling into the Energy & Water funding bill starting today and the full House is expected to take up legislation that would restart the long-stalled process to store commercial nuclear waste at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain site.  Tomorrow, House Energy looks at EVs and Senate Energy is focused on Puerto Rico. On Wednesday, DOE Secretary Perry testifies before House Science tomorrow, while Senate Environment is focused on water Infrastructure.   Thursday, Interior Secretary Zinke heads to Senate Approps while Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross will likely get trade/tariff questions at his budget hearing.

Tomorrow, my colleague Scott Segal speaks at the CHP industry’s policy forum.  C2ES will host a Wednesday conversation with utilities, federal and state policy experts, and industry analysts to discuss solutions to address early nuclear retirements and zero-carbon generation, while WCEE hosts a policy lunch with Congressional energy/environment staff.  On Thursday, WASHINGTON POST LIVE and its Energy 202 newsletter (our friends Steve Mufson and Dino Grandoni) will host a forum at 9:00 a.m. at the Post Live Center on cybersecurity and the grid featuring Sens. Martin Heinrich and John Hoeven, as well as FERC Chair Kevin McIntyre.

While we normally don’t pay much attention to primaries, tomorrow is primary day in West Virginia and Indiana.  In WV, energy advocate AG Patrick Morrisey and Rep. Evan Jenkins are battling with controversial former coal exec and convicted felon Don Blankenship for the right to challenge Sen. Joe Manchin.  In Indiana, Wabash College alums Reps. Luke Messer and Todd Rokita, as well as former Dem State Rep. Mike Braun all have been hugging the President but running away from college transgressions as Little Giants. Both long-time energy industry supporters, Manchin and Donnelly are seen as the most vulnerable Democrats in the Senate.

This week is Hurricane Preparedness Week.  With the 2018 Hurricane Season approaching (June 1), remember the experts at MIT have a significant amount of really interesting research pushing the frontier of building materials use, with implications for policymakers, building designers, communities, and the vulnerable residents of hazard-prone areas.  They also have the MIT-developed Break-Even Mitigation Percent (BEMP) tool which helps building designers and owners make better risk-informed decisions before the disaster hits. You can use the tool to calculate the BEMP for eastern U.S. coastal communities prone to damage from hazards related to hurricanes.  Call with questions.  Best,

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

c. (202) 997-5932

 

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“While consumers may not think about it when they flip the light switch, turn on the air conditioning, or even gas up their cars, the American energy industry is at the forefront of groundbreaking innovation and technology development. Our goal is to put a spotlight on the ingenuity behind America’s ongoing energy revolution, especially the investments being made to find new and better ways to produce, transmit, and use energy, the foundation of our lives and our economy.”

Karen Harbert, president and CEO of the Global Energy Institute during today’s launch of EnergyInnovates, a multi-platform initiative that will showcase American innovators, projects, and technologies that have shaped today’s energy landscape and will lay the groundwork for the future.

“Word is out that wind power is an excellent source of affordable, reliable and clean energy. The industry is consistently growing the wind project pipeline as leading companies, including utilities and brands like AT&T and Nestle, keep placing orders. Strong demand for wind power is fueling an economic engine supporting a record 105,500 U.S. wind jobs in farm and factory towns across the nation.”

Tom Kiernan, CEO of AWEA in announcing the U.S. Wind Industry First Quarter 2018 Market Report in advance of today’s WINDPOWER event in Chicago.

ON THE POD

Energy Gang Discussed New Tech Investments with Statoil –On a recent Energy Gang podcast, our friends at GTM talked with the executive in charge of Statoil’s new energy investments, Stephen Bull.  Statoil is the largest operator of oil and gas rigs around the world. Consequently, the company’s biggest low-carbon investments are offshore: floating wind farms and distributed carbon capture and storage. Bull chats with The Energy Gang about the performance of floating wind, the economics of CCS, and whether oil companies are investing enough in their new energy divisions.

FUN OPINIONS

Consumer Group: Time to Reform RFS – Recently, David Holt of the Consumer Energy Alliance wrote an opinion piece calling on Congress to fully reform the RFS program.  Holt said there are several big problems with the RFS, including what’s called the “ethanol blend wall.” Most American cars and light trucks have been built to run on a fuel blend of 90 percent gasoline and 10 percent ethanol. Using more ethanol would void most vehicle warranties provided by all major automotive manufacturers. Similarly, most underground storage tanks and gasoline pumps used by gasoline stations across the country cannot accommodate more ethanol.  Holt: “Congress should act now to make meaningful changes to the RFS. Without congressional action, farmers, transporters, refiners, and everyone who buys gasoline will continue to pay the price.”

IN THE NEWS

ClearPath Adds Leading Experts To Advisory Board – Clear Path has added thought leaders in the fields of energy policy and technology, as well as conservative politics and messaging, to its advisory board.

  • George David Banks was President Trump’s Special Assistant for International Energy and Environment. He was previously senior advisor on International Affairs and Climate Change at the White House Council on Environmental Quality under President George W. Bush, deputy GOP staff director of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, a State Department foreign service officer and a CIA economic analyst. He is currently executive vice president of the American Council on Capital Formation and an adjunct research scholar at Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy.
  • Ed Holland is the former president and CEO of Southern Company Holdings and executive vice president of Southern Company Services. He was also previously president, CEO and chairman of Mississippi Power.
  • Richard Mroz is the former president of the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities and chaired the Critical Infrastructure Committee for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, among many other senior-level national, regional and state roles. That includes being named to the Commission on White House Fellowships by President George W. Bush.
  • Terry Sullivan is founding partner of Firehouse Strategies and has two decades under his belt as a well-seasoned political and public affairs strategist. He has played a senior strategic role in more than 100 campaigns, including U.S. Senate, gubernatorial and presidential candidacies. Notably, that included successful reelection wins for Sens. Marco Rubio and Ron Johnson in 2016 and Sullivan was Rubio’s 2016 presidential campaign manager.

Groups Urge White House, EPA to Support HFC Phasedown – The Alliance for Responsible Atmospheric Policy and AHRI released their comprehensive study: Economic Impact of Kigali Ratification & Implementation, supporting the ratification of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol which calls for a phase down in the production and consumption of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) worldwide.  The Kigali Amendment gives American companies an advantage in technology, manufacturing, and investment which will lead to job creation. The economic analysis indicates that U.S. implementation of the Kigali Amendment is good for American jobs. It will both strengthen America’s exports and weaken the market for imported products, while enabling U.S. technology to continue its world leadership role.   According to the study:

  • The Kigali amendment is projected to increase U.S. manufacturing jobs by 33,000 by 2027, increase exports by $5 billion, reduce imports by nearly $7 billion, and improve the HVACR balance of trade.
  • With Kigali, U.S. exports will outperform, increasing U.S. share of global market from 7.2% to 9.0%.
  • Fluorocarbon-based manufacturing industries in the U.S. directly employ 589,000 Americans, with an industry-wide payroll of more than $39 billion per year. The fluorocarbon industry in the U.S. indirectly supports 494,000 American jobs with a $36 billion annual payroll.

According to the analysis, the U.S. fluorocarbon using and producing industries contribute more than $205 billion annually in direct goods and services and provide employment to more than 2.5 million individuals and overall economic activity of $620 billion to the U.S. economy.

AWEA Report Says 1Q Demand Rolling – With WINDPOWER launching today, there a new report by the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) says strong demand for wind energy drove a busy first quarter for new U.S. wind farm announcements. Wind power’s low cost and stable energy prices motivated utility and non-utility customers to sign contracts for 3,500 megawatts (MW) of U.S. wind capacity in the first quarter of 2018, a high water mark in recent years. The U.S. Wind Industry First Quarter 2018 Market Report also reveals 5,523 MW in first quarter wind project announcements, adding to a total of 33,449 MW of wind power capacity in the combined construction and advanced development pipeline.  Utilities and Fortune 500 brands both continue to scale up investments in wind energy because it makes good business sense. The cost of wind power has fallen by two-thirds since 2009, making wind cost-competitive with other energy sources. In fact, in strong wind resource regions like the Great Plains and Texas, wind is the most cost-effective source of new electricity. And because wind power has no fuel costs, buyers can lock in low rates for decades to protect against future fuel price spikes. Wind energy customers signed over 3,500 MW in long-term contracts called power purchase agreements (PPAs) in the first quarter. That’s the highest volume of PPA announcements in any quarter since AWEA began tracking them in 2013. Six companies including Adobe, AT&T and Nestle signed wind PPAs for the first time, while Bloomberg, Facebook, Nike and T-Mobile became repeat customers. In addition, utility buyers including PacifiCorp and DTE Energy made large-scale announcements to develop and own wind power. Across the country, 36 wind projects representing a combined 5,523 MW announced that they either began construction or entered advanced development in the first quarter. Construction started on 1,366 MW of wind capacity and 4,158 MW entered advanced stages of development, which includes projects that have found a buyer for their energy, announced a firm turbine order, or have been announced to proceed under utility ownership. The full pipeline of wind farms under construction or in advanced development now totals 33,449 MW, a 40 percent increase over this time last year and the highest level since this statistic was first measured at the beginning of 2016.

DTE Pushes Green Bonds – DTE Energy in rolled out its green bonds program. The $525 million in bonds will finance green investments, including low-carbon projects such as renewable energy and energy efficiency. DTE is the fifth [energy] company in the nation to sell green bonds. “Green bonds will help finance our low-carbon investments, which will enable us to continue moving Michigan toward a cleaner, more sustainable energy future,” says Gerry Anderson, chairman and CEO of DTE Energy. “This is a tangible way for investors to demonstrate their commitment to the environment and is one of many steps in our aggressive plan to reduce carbon emissions by more than 80 percent by 2050. We’re proud to be among the first energy companies to offer this green investment option.”  The bonds have a maturity of 30 years at an annual fixed coupon of 4.05 percent. They are expected to help fund the development and construction of solar arrays and wind farms, including the transmission infrastructure to support renewable energy facilities, as well as strengthen energy efficiency programs.

DTE Gas Plant Approved by Michigan – In related DTE news, the Michigan Public Service Commission approved DTE Energy’s gas plant proposal for East China Township. The utility is scheduled to break ground on the new facility in 2019. The plant is one of the steps the company is taking to reduce carbon emissions by 30% by the early 2020s, and more than 80% by 2050.

FERC Shows Strong Renewable Growth in 1Q – A new FERC update says wind, solar, and other renewable sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower) accounted for almost 95% (i.e., 94.9%) of all new U.S. electrical generation placed into service in the first quarter of this year.  FERC’s latest “Energy Infrastructure Update” shows that 16 new “units” of wind, totaling 1,793 megawatts (MW), came into service in the first three months of 2018 along with 92 units of solar (1,356-MW) for a total of 3,149-MW.  In addition, there was one unit of geothermal steam (19-MW), five units of water (18-MW), and three units of biomass (3-MW). Among non-renewable sources, six units of natural gas provided another 79-MW of new capacity along with five units of oil (10-MW), and one unit of nuclear (4-MW). There were also six units (80-MW) defined as “other” by FERC (e.g., fuel cells, batteries & storage). No capacity additions were reported for coal during the quarter.  FERC data also reveal that the total installed capacity of renewable energy sources now provides over one-fifth (20.69%) of total available U.S. generating capacity. Combined, wind and solar alone exceed one-tenth (10.44%) of installed capacity – a share greater than that of nuclear power (9.14%) or hydropower (8.52%) or oil (3.56%).  FERC’s report further suggests that the rapid expansion and growing dominance of renewable energy sources will continue at least through April 2021. Proposed new net generating capacity (i.e., additions minus retirements) by renewables over the next three years totals 148,281-MW or 70.1% of the total (i.e., 211,621-MW). Proposed new net generating capacity by wind (85,625-MW) and solar (49,088-MW) alone are 63.7% of the total – supplemented by hydropower (11,824-MW), geothermal (1,130-MW), and biomass (614-MW).

 

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

WINDPOWER Set for Chicago – The American Wind Energy Assn (AWEA) will hold WINDPOWER 2018 in Chicago from today through Thursday.  The industry closed 2017 strong, delivering 7,017 megawatts (MW) of new wind power capacity. That new capacity represents $11 billion in new private investment. There are now 89,077 MW of wind power installed across 41 states, enough to power 26 million American homes.  The wind industry is expected to continue its growth into 2018. WINDPOWER is where the industry comes together to plan for the future and keep this success story growing.

Approps Subpanel to Mark Energy Budget – The House Appropriations Committee’s Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies will meet today at 5:30 p.m. to mark-up the FY 2019 Energy and Water Appropriations Bill.

BP Tech Head to Discuss Global Energy – The Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center will hold a wide-ranging discussion tomorrow at 9:00 a.m. about the role of technology in shaping the future of global energy. The energy industry is changing faster than at any time in our lifetime. It faces two huge challenges: firstly, providing more energy than ever before to meet the world’s increasing demand; and secondly, transitioning to a lower carbon future. Drawing upon analysis conducted by BP and its partners, BP’s Technology Head David Eyton will discuss some of the major longer-term signals out to 2050, as well as key findings in transport, power and heat. Eyton’s conversation will also cover the key game-changing technologies for the energy industry and the challenges we face.

Combined Heat Power Industry Holds Forum – The CHP Association and the combined heat and power community hold their annual CHP Policy Forum tomorrow and Wednesday at The City Club of Washington. This year, conference presentations will focus on how to better implement CHP programs. The theme of this year’s forum is “engaging with decision makers” and will feature key figures in various areas of legislation, regulation, and government. The forum will explore the barriers and drivers for CHP at every jurisdiction—including city, state, regional, and federal—with the understanding that policy considerations for energy planning vary across different jurisdictions.  My colleague Scott Segal will speak tomorrow afternoon on policy effects on the future of energy markets.

BPC to Host Panel on Federal Science – The Bipartisan Policy Center will host a forum tomorrow at 9:00 a.m., looking at federal funding for Fiscal Year 2018 for research and development. Continually developing new scientific knowledge and technologies drives long-term economic growth and creates higher-skilled jobs. BPC will focus its conversation on federal investment in scientific research and innovation and how to maintain America’s economic and competitive edge.

Senate Energy Committee to Look at Puerto Rico – The Senate Energy Committee will convene an oversight hearing tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. to examine the current status of Puerto Rico’s electric grid and proposals for the future operation of the grid.  Witnesses include DOE’s Bruce Walker, Charles Alexander of the Army Corps of Engineers, ; Christian Sobrino Vega, of the Puerto Rico Government Development Bank President, Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority CEO Walter Higgins, José Román Morales of the Puerto Rico Energy Commission and Rodrigo Masses of the Puerto Rico Manufacturers Association.

IAE to Hold Biofuel Presentation – The International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy Technology Collaboration Program will hold an international webinar, “Biofuels for the Marine Sector: New Opportunities and New Challenges,” tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. The webinar will give an overview of the maritime transportation sector, including its fuel and engine types, the fuel supply infrastructure, and the regulations on fuel specifications and CO2 emissions. The feasibility of current biofuels including their properties and supply will be discussed and opportunities for new types of biofuel will be presented.

House Energy Panel to Look at Electric Vehicles – The House Energy and Commerce Environment Subcommittee holds a hearing tomorrow at 10:15 a.m. on policy implications of electric and conventional vehicles in the years ahead.

Forum to Discuss LNG Study – U.S. Energy Association will hold a forum tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. featuring energy economists at ICF who recently conducted a study for LNG Allies.  The study “Calculating the Benefits of US LNG Exports” looked at direct, indirect, and induced value added ($GDP) and employment from LNG terminals and the natural gas feedstock.  The principal author of the ICF report, Harry Vidas, joins Fred H. Hutchison, President/CEO, of LNG Allies to discuss the findings.

Perry, Haley, Ross to Attend Conference – The Council of the Americas will hold its 48th annual conference tomorrow at the U.S. Department of State.  The annual conferences have traditionally featured presentations by the president, the secretary of state, foreign heads of state, cabinet officials from the hemisphere, and leaders of the business community. The 2018 Washington Conference on the Americas will bring together administration senior officials and distinguished leaders from across the Americas to focus on the major policy issues affecting the hemisphere.  UN Abassador Nikki Haley, Energy Secretary Perry, Commerce Secretary Ross and Sens. Ben Sasse, Robert Menendez and Marco Rubio, among many others, will speak.

EnviroRun Features Amy Harder – Tomorrow evening, Envirorun DC hosts Amy Harder, energy and climate change reporter at Axios. Amy is an energy and climate change reporter at Axios, both in her regular column called Harder Line, and her other reporting for Axios she covers congressional legislation, regulations, lobbying, and international policy actions affecting energy and climate change issues in the United States. She previously covered the same issues for The Wall Street Journal and before that at National Journal.  The run begins at 6:00 p.m. and we will return to the venue for networking and hear from the speaker at 7:00 p.m.

OPIS Looks at West Coast Fuel Supply – OPIS holds a forum in Napa Valley at the Silverado Resort on Wednesday and Thursday looking at West Coast fuel supplies and transportation opportunities.  Industry experts will examine the impact of new players in the Western markets, opportunities that California assets can offer, carbon emissions regulations, renewable fuels, plus get an exclusive technical analysis of West Coast spot market prices.

Perry Heads to House Science – The House Science Committee holds a hearing on Wednesday at 9:00 a.m. for an overview of the DOE budget proposal for FY 2019.   Energy Secretary Rick Perry testifies.

Forum to Look at Nuclear Challenges – The Center for Climate and Energy Solutions holds a conversation on Wednesday at GWU’s Lerner Hall at 9:30 a.m. featuring utilities, federal and state policy experts, and industry analysts to discuss solutions to address this question and others.  The event will feature a keynote from Ralph Izzo, CEO of PSEG, as well as perspectives on state policy options, environmental and economic impacts, and the federal landscape.

Senate Environment to Look at Water Infrastructure – The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee holds a hearing at 10:00 a.m. on water infrastructure legislation.

Senate Energy Panel Tackles BLM, Forest Service Law Enforcement – The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Public Lands, Forests and Mining Subcommittee holds a hearing on Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. looking at law enforcement programs at BLM and the Forest Service.

WCEE Forum Looks Congressional Energy Agenda – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) will host a forum on Thursday at 8:00 a.m. at the American Gas Association to look at the Congressional agenda in the first year of the Trump Administration.  WCEE hosts for a wide-ranging conversation over breakfast about Congressional priorities and areas for bipartisan agreement on energy and environment issues. Key Congressional staffers who will offer their insights and opinions on the busy year that lies ahead include Senate Energy’s Chester Carson and Brie Van Cleve, Emily Domenech of the House Science Committee’s Energy panel, House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Energy and Environment Majority Chief Counsel Mary Martin and several others.

ELI Holds Wetlands Awards – The Environmental Law Institute holds its annual National Wetlands Awards on Wednesday evening at U.S. Botanical Gardens. The National Wetlands Awards are presented annually to individuals who have excelled in wetlands protection, restoration, and education. Through coordinated media outreach and an awards ceremony on Capitol Hill, awardees receive national recognition and attention for their outstanding efforts.

FERC Chair, Senators Discuss Cyber at Post Forum –WASHINGTON POST LIVE and its Energy 202 newsletter will host a forum on Thursday at 9:00 a.m.at the Washington Post Live Center on cybersecurity and the grid. Lawmakers Sens. Martin Heinrich and John Hoeven will debate the administration’s energy priorities and discuss the security of America’s energy grid, including how to combat cyber threats. Our friend Dino Grandoni, Energy and Environmental Policy Reporter and Author of “The Energy 202” newsletter will host. Then, Steven Mufson hosts a “One-on-One” with the FERC Chairman Kevin McIntyre.  The head of the FERC will discuss new regulations and proposals to shore up the security of power grid operations and the balance between the agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.  There will also be several other speakers including Dennis McGinn.

CEQ Infrastructure Lead Headline ELI Conference – Arnold & Porter and the Environmental Law Institute are co-hosting a conference Thursday at 9:00 a.m. on infrastructure review and permitting. Conference attendees will hear a variety of critical perspectives across the spectrum. High level government officials, experienced practitioners representing industry and environmental NGOs, and congressional representatives will address the wide range of environmental permitting and review challenges across sectors including transportation, energy, transmission, renewables, environmental restoration, and more. Panelists will delve into the role of policy and litigation in shaping these developments over the next three years and beyond. Conference participants representing diverse backgrounds will explore areas of common ground at the intersection of good government, economic growth, and environmental protection.  Keynote speaker is CEQ’s Alex Herrgott.

Zinke Discusses Budget – The Senate Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee will host Interior Secretary Ryan ZInke at 10:00 a.m. to discuss on the 2019 budget and proposed cuts to agencies including BLM, Fish and Wildlife Service and National Park Service.

House Energy Panel to Look at Transmission Infrastructure – The House Energy & Commerce’s Energy Subcommittee will hold a hearing on Thursday at 10:00 a.m. in 2123 Rayburn examining the state of electric transmission infrastructure investment, planning, construction and alternatives.

USEA Forum to Discuss Coal Utilization – The US Energy Assn will hold a forum on Thursday at 1:00 p.m. on chemical looping in coal utilization.  The event will feature work by Ohio State researcher Andrew Tong.

Forum to Look at City Partnerships on Renewables, EE – On Thursday at 2:00 p.m., the Alliance for a Sustainable future, a joint initiative of The U.S. Conference of Mayors and the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) will host a webinar on expanding energy efficiency and demand side management, adding more renewable energy and shifting the fuel mix of the local electric grid have emerged as critical strategies for cities striving to achieve ambitious climate goals. In this webinar, the ASF highlights how city-utility partnerships are engaging their communities and charting a course to a cleaner and smarter energy future, featuring collaborations in the Salt Lake City, and the Asheville, North Carolina, regions. These city-utility partnerships, which have local and regional impacts, offer valuable lessons for other cities around the country.

IN THE FUTURE

Infrastructure Week – May 14th -18th

Ross to Speak at Press Club – On Monday May 14th at 12:30 p.m.  Commerce Secretary will speak at a National Press Club Headliners Luncheon.  He’ll discuss how the DOC is creating conditions for economic growth and opportunity for the people of the US.  Secretary Ross, a former bankruptcy specialist and American investor, has been an increasingly common fixture on CNBC amidst the United States’ looming trade war with China (a result of President Trump’s deluge of new tariffs and changes to US trade policies) and his recent decision to overrule officials in the Census Bureau, an agency housed within the Department of Commerce, on the inclusion of a controversial citizenship question in the 2020 census.

Salazar Heads Press Club Dinner – The National Press Club Communicators Team hold its Legends Dinner on Wednesday, May 16th at 6:00 p.m. in the Winners’ Room.  The honored guest will be former Interior Secretary and Colorado Sen. Ken Salazar. The dinner conversation will focus on the important communications-based strategies that moved his agenda and built a strong communications team, touching on: due diligence, crisis management, gaining congressional and White House support, building consensus with business leaders and constituents and working with media and reporters.  Salazar will share practical lessons and challenges with that can bring value to contemporary communicators.

Senate Approps to Host Pruitt – EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is scheduled to testify on May 16th before the Senate appropriations subcommittee that oversees his budget according to Sen. Lisa Murkowski, who chairs the panel.

BPC to look at Private-Public Partnerships – The BPC’s Executive Council on Infrastructure is holding an event on Wednesday May 16th at 10:00 a.m. highlighting the role of public-private partnerships, or P3s, in addressing America’s $2 trillion in unmet infrastructure needs. P3s can bring private sector innovation, expertise, and capital to projects, helping communities across the U.S. modernize their transportation, water, and other infrastructure systems. Keynote remarks by Australian Ambassador to US Joe Hockey and a panel featuring Bechtel’s Keith Hennessy and Lilliana Ortega of Parsons.

AEE to Hold Cybersecurity, Grid Webinar – The Advanced Energy Economy will hold a webinar on Thursday May 17th at 2:00 p.m. on cybersecurity in a distributed energy future.  The webinar will address protecting an evolving grid from digital attack. The  panel of experts — all contributors to the AEE Institute white paper on cybersecurity — will discuss ways to make an increasingly complex, interactive, and distributed electricity system more resilient against cyber threats. Panelists include John Berdner of Enphase Energy, NYPA’s Ken Carnes, Navigant’s Ken Lotterhos and Todd Wiedman, Director, Security and Network, Landis+Gyr. Moderated by Lisa Frantzis, Senior Vice President, 21st Century Energy System, Advanced Energy Economy.

Fox to Address Trade, Immigration, Trump – The National Press Club will host a Headliners Luncheon on Tuesday, May 22nd featuring former Mexican President Vicente Fox.  Fox will deliver an address entitled “Democracy at the Crossroads: Globalization versus Nationalism”.  Fox, a right-wing populist representing the National Action Party (PAN), was elected as the 55th President of Mexico on December 1, 2000. Winning with 42% of the vote, Fox made history as the first presidential candidate in 71 years to defeat the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Fox’s administration focused chiefly on improving trade relations with the United States and maintaining Mexico’s growing economy. Fox left office in 2006, and in a break with his country’s cultural norms and traditions has remained in the public eye post-presidency and has not been shy about expressing his views and opinions.

CSIS, EPIC to Hold Nuclear Forum – CSIS and the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC) will hold a half-day public conference on Thursday afternoon May 24th to address pressing questions in an effort to better understand the potential future of U.S. nuclear power. Nuclear energy faces an uncertain future in the United States as the fuel is beset by fierce competition from natural gas and renewable energy in many markets. Coupled with failure to deliver new projects on time and at cost, along with a public sensitive to operational safety, existing and future nuclear power generation is at risk in the United States.

FERC Chair Headlines EIA Annual Energy Conference – EIA holds Its annual 2018 Energy Conference on June 4th and 5th at the Washington Hilton.  FERC Chair Kevin McIntyre will keynote the event.

Hydrogen, Fuel Cell Forum Set for DC – The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association will be hosting a full-day forum and exposition on Tuesday, June 12 in Washington, D.C. at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center with leading executives, experts, and policymakers on fuel cell and hydrogen technology. The forum will bring together key federal and state policymakers, including the Department of Energy and White House, as well as the broader environmental, transportation, and energy communities to raise awareness of the benefits of fuel cell and hydrogen technology. This event will precede the Department of Energy’s 2018 Annual Merit Review.

GTM to Host Grid Forum – Greentech Media host Grid Edge Innovation Summit on June 20th and 21st in San Francisco.  The event is an energy conference that will examine the energy customer of tomorrow and how new innovative business models are quickly emerging.  GTM brings together forward thinking and prominent members of the energy ecosystem and as our research team explores the future of the market. Former FERC Chair Jon Wellinghoff will speak along with many others, including our friends Shayle Kann, Julia Pyper and Stephen Lacey.

Young Professional Program for World Gas Forum Set – The Young Professionals Program (YPP) will hold a special forum during the World Gas Conference June 25-29 in Washington, DC.  YPP will provide a great opportunity for promising young professionals in the energy sector to learn from top leaders in the natural gas industry and network with their peers throughout the world.  More on this as we get closer.

Clean Energy Forum on Schedule – The 2018 Congressional Clean Energy Expo and Policy Forum will be held on July 10th and brings together up to 45-55 businesses, trade associations, and government agencies to showcase renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

Energy Update: Week of April 16

Friends,

Welcome to Marathon Monday, better known as Patriot’s Day.  Today is the 122nd Boston Marathon and this year the weather looks pretty windy, cold and soggy.  You can see the Boston Globe’s coverage full coverage here.  The elite runners have already finished and for the first time in 33 years, an American woman has claimed victory.  Metro Detroit native Desiree Linden took the lead around the 35-kilometer mark and did not look back, capturing her first major marathon win by a wide margin as she crossed the finish line in 2:39:54. Meanwhile, Japan’s Yuki Kawauchi completed a wild come-from-behind win, closing a 90-second gap in the last mile to overtake defending champion Geoffrey Kirui in 2:10:46.

For the second year, Marathon Monday has special meaning for us as Hannah is reporting live from the rainy “Wellesley Scream tunnel” at Mile 13.  A few folks from NBC Sports Network joined college organizers for the sign-making event at Wellesley’s Davis Museum last year for a Boston Marathon Segment on the Scream Tunnel.  The course, which rolls right past campus, is a celebratory tradition. It also has been 5 years since the 2013 terrorist attack, which highlighted the amazing strength and healing the city showed as a community.  The days surrounding that fateful attack were depicted very well in the recent movie Patriot’s Day.  Finally, starting Thursday, our friends at Valero host the PGA’s Texas Open this week in San Antonio at the TPC.  Last year’s Masters Champ Sergio Garcia, defending champ Kevin Chappell, Martin Kaymer and Jim Furyk are among those players in the field.

It is a busy week in DC after Paul Ryan announced his intention to retire as Speaker.  There are a bunch of budget hearings in the enviro/energy space headlined by FERC Commissioners at House Energy tomorrow and Ag Sect Perdue at Approps on Wednesday.  Meanwhile, House Ways & Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady hosts a closed-door “roundtable” Wednesday to discuss more issues on tax extenders.  Other hearings include Senate Energy hearings on energy-related challenges and opportunities in remote and rural areas featuring NRECA members Thursday and an NPS officials discussing Park maintenance tomorrow, as well as a Senate Enviro hearing on States and groundwater Wednesday.

Other great events this week include a Tax Day event at the Chamber tomorrow as well as a forum at UChicago’s Energy Policy Institute that features my colleague Jeff Holmstead and our friend Amy Harder of Axios. On Wednesday, WCEE hosts a brown bag lunch with our friends Maya Weber, Pam King and Jasmin Melvin to discuss energy and Trump.  Then Thursday, the Columbia Global Energy Project hosts half-day forum will include keynote remarks, interviews and plenary conversations with folks like CP CEO Ryan Lance, Dave Banks, DOE’s Dan Brouillette and IEA’s Fatih Birol.

Finally, for those of you on the trade/tariff beat as well, opponents of steel and aluminum tariffs will release new report at the National Press Club on Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. that will reveal the downward effect of tariffs on steel capacity utilization as well as will detail the decline in U.S. manufacturing jobs that result from the Section 232 tariffs. The event will also mark the launch of the Coalition of American Metal Manufacturers and Users, comprised of small and medium U.S. manufacturing companies united in an effort to oppose the 25% tariff on steel imports.

Remember to send in your taxes!!!  Call with questions.  Best,

 

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

c. (202) 997-5932

 

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“Andrew (Wheeler)’s work for over a decade in a variety of leadership roles in Congress and his previous work at EPA itself make him uniquely qualified for his new role, and we look forward to working with him.” 

Karen Harbert, president and CEO of U.S. Chamber’s Global Energy Institute on the Senate approval of Andrew Wheeler’s nomination to be Deputy Administrator at EPA

 

ON THE POD

CapCrude Looks at New Mexico Prominence as Oil Producer – New Mexico has become the third top US oil-producing state. EIA oil market analysts Jeff Barron and Mason Hamilton return to Capitol Crude this week to talk about New Mexican oil production, which has jumped ahead of Alaska and California thanks to the Permian Basin.  Our friend Meghan Gordon interviews.

FUN OPINIONS

Axios Column: Why Trump Should Redo Fuel Standards – Our friend Amy Harder of Axios has a great column out today on President Trump’s moves on the Obama fuel standards.  She argues of the environmental regulations President Trump is rolling back, the one that makes the most sense to rewrite-but not repeal-are the fuel-efficiency standards former President Obama issued in 2012.  Amy argues the average stated fuel economy of new vehicles purchased has flatlined at around 25 miles per gallon since October 2014, right when oil prices were dropping partly in response to America’s oil boom. This is because consumers have shifted their preferences from cars to bigger vehicles.

IN THE NEWS

ClearPath Expert Weighs In on Nuclear Breakthrough – It’s understandable to lose track of every nook and cranny in the massive budget deal Congress recently approved, including an important revision and extension of a key carbon capture incentive (more on that HERE).  But embedded in that deal was another update to the tax code too important to overlook. In fact, it is the most impactful congressional action to propel the future of nuclear energy in more than a decade.  ClearPath’s in-house nuclear guru Spencer Nelson breaks down the significance of this bipartisan fix to the 45J nuclear production tax credit, which will not only help complete the AP1000 reactor expansion at Georgia Power’s Plant Vogtle but is also essential to helping next-generation small modular reactors and other more advanced technologies. Spencer also explains why this 45J fix alone is likely insufficient to spur those advanced technologies. Among other needed steps: Securing a steady domestic uranium source, Nuclear Regulatory Commission reform, a fast-spectrum test reactor user facility, moonshot technology demonstration goals, indirect financing and a solution to nuclear waste storage.

White House Moves on Reforming NAAQS Rules, Timelines – The White House issued an executive order late last week ordering EPA to ease some of its procedures around the regulating of six key air pollutants under the Clean Air Act. Highlights from the order include 1) EPA must complete reviews of state plans to reduce pollution within 18 months, 2) It must complete reviews of project pre-construction permits within a year, 3) Review the federal plans imposed on some states under the regional haze program to see if they can be replaced with state plans, 4) When considering emissions levels, EPA must take into account pollution from other countries, even in states that are not on U.S. borders. It also must consider whether states have reduced pollution to “background levels” and 5) allow states to engage in trading of pollution offsets.  The Chamber’s Dan Byers Dan Byers said the directive contains “commonsense reforms that will improve the air quality regulatory process so domestic manufacturing and job creation face fewer regulatory barriers. The EPA, states, and businesses have a long track record of working cooperatively to improve air quality across the nation. Unfortunately, during the previous administration, that cooperation was abandoned in favor of an overly aggressive approach that unfairly burdened state and local economies. Byers adds this directive will restore the cooperation necessary for continued environmental progress while enhancing the competitiveness of U.S. industry.”

EPA Deputy Approved – The Senate confirmed former longtime Capitol Hill aide Andrew Wheeler as deputy administrator of EPA 53-45, despite some Complaints and delays from Democrats.  Dem Sens. Manchin, Heitkamp, Donnelly and Republican Susan Collins all supported Wheeler, who also worked at EPA under Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.  Chamber’s Global Energy Institute CEO Karen Harbert, said they are pleased that the Senate has confirmed Wheeler.  Harbert says his extensive experience and deep knowledge will be an asset to EPA as it seeks to implement its agenda.

Perry to Head to India – Energy Secretary Rick Perry said he will tout the potential of exporting U.S. carbon capture technologies in a trip beginning Friday in India. The conversation will center on India’s continued growth in buying U.S. technologies to innovate their energy sector and carbon capture “will be part of that,” Perry responded to Sen. John Hoeven (R-N.D.) at a Senate Energy and Water Appropriations FY19 budget hearing. “We want it to be U.S.-based resources as often as possible but we also want it to be as clean burning as it can be,” Perry said.  Hoeven touted efforts in his state, including Project Tundra, which would retrofit an existing coal facility with carbon capture technologies.

GTM Report Looks at Global Storage Market – The annual global energy storage market will be 8.6 GW and 21.6 GWh by 2022, according to a new GTM Research report. The U.S. is expected to stay at the forefront of the global market through 2022 but China will grow to be the second-largest market in 2019.  The new report on worldwide storage deployments from GTM Research says U.S. and Australia led the pack in 2017, thanks to several mega-projects coming online, and market drivers that reward storage investment. Germany and Australia thrive in the residential storage segment, which hasn’t achieved significant scale in the U.S.  China is just getting started, but could surpass almost everyone in deployments over the next five years.  Most of these markets have barely emerged from their pilot stages and offer very few use cases for storage that can earn a profit. Expect that to change rapidly in the coming years. In the meantime, here’s what you need to know about the global energy storage market.

Ameren Startup Accelerator Seeks to Develop Smart Grid Tech – Midwest Energy News has a great Q&A with Brian Dixon, CEO of Capital Innovators in St. Louis, Missouri about his company’s partnership with Ameren on an energy tech accelerator.  The Ameren Accelerator, an energy start-up incubator based in St. Louis, develops innovative technology through a partnership with power company Ameren, the University of Missouri, UMSL Accelerate and Capital Innovators. Last year, Ameren selected seven companies to participate on smart grid technology. For example, Hyperion Sensors is developing a smart transformer; Omega Grid, a software platform that facilitates peer-to-peer energy exchange and WIFIPLUG, an open-source smart plug.

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Cal Gov heads to Press Club – California Gov. Jerry Brown will speak at the National Press Club tomorrow morning at 8:30 a.m. in the Zenger Room.  Gov. Brown will join NPC President Andrea Edney to discuss how California has changed under his leadership and the challenges facing his successor.

Chamber Holds Tax Event – On Tax Day tomorrow, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce will host a forum featuring Sen. Pat Toomey to address discuss the benefits of the recently enacted tax reform legislation.  There will also be panels featuring energy issues.

FERC Commissioner Head to House Energy – The House Energy and Commerce Committee panel on energy will host all FERC commissioners to testify tomorrow on budget issues.

Senate Energy Looks at Park Maintenance – The Senate Energy Committee holds a hearing at 10:00 a.m. on deferred maintenance and operational needs of the National Park Service.  Witnesses NPS’s  Lena McDowall, National Park Foundation CEO Will Shafroth, REI’s Marc Berejka, Sarah Leonard of the Alaska Travel Industry Association; Shawn Regan of the Property and Environmental Research Center and Richard Ring of the Coalition to Protect America’s National Parks.

CSIS Hosts Pershing – The CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a forum tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. with former State Dept climate expert Jonathan Pershing for a discussion on strategies in the philanthropic community to address climate change, including ongoing work at the Hewlett Foundation.  Pershing is the Program Director of Environment at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and previously, Jonathan served as Special Envoy for Climate Change at the U.S. Department of State and lead U.S. negotiator to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change.

AEI to Host Discussion on Climate Lawsuits – AEI will hold a forum tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. for a discussion on the legal and scientific issues raised by the lawsuits against major fossil-fuel producers and the underlying implications for the municipal bond market. Speakers will include Niskanen’s David Bookbinder, Andrew Grossman of BakerHostetler, Michael MacCracken of the Climate Institute, Cato’s Patrick J. Michaels, Stephen Winterstein of Wilmington Trust Investment Advisors and AEI’s Ben Zycher.

Forum to Look at Future of Renewables – POLITICO hosts a happy hour deep-dive tomorrow at 5:00 p.m. looking at how private businesses are stepping up to address the future of clean energy and how they can work with the government to build a more sustainable future. FERC’s Neil Chatterjee, Sen. Michael Bennet and ACORE’s Greg Wetstone will speak.

JHU to Host Solar Book Author – Tomorrow at 5:00 p.m., Johns Hopkins University hosts a book forum with Dr. Varun Sivaram on solar energy.  Solar energy has become the cheapest and fastest-growing power source on earth. However, in order for it to achieve its full potential, Dr. Sivaram argues in his new book that several kinds of innovation are required including financial innovation and new business models to facilitate the spread of off-grid applications; technology innovation to replace today’s solar panels with coatings as cheap as paint; and systemic innovation to allow more flexible power grids to handle intermittent solar power.

Holmstead Headlines EPIC Forum on NatGas – The Energy Policy Institute of Chicago (EPIC) University holds a forum tomorrow at 5:30 p.m. Fracking has upended the American energy system, bringing lower energy prices, greater energy security, reduced air pollution, and fewer carbon emissions. But at a local level, communities must weigh economic benefits against potential health and other costs. Join EPIC Director Michael Greenstone and EPIC’s inaugural policy fellows Jeff Holmstead and Sue Tierney as they explore these competing variables and the policy pathways to addressing them at the federal, state and local levels. The conversation will be moderated by Axios reporter Amy Harder.

Energy Storage Forum Set in Boston – The Energy Storage Association holds its 28th annual conference and expo in Boston at the Hynes Convention Center Wednesday through Friday.  Energy storage technology continues to advance towards integrating electricity from any source into a more resilient and reliable grid, creating jobs, lowering energy bills, and helping to secure our energy future.  Speakers Include MA Gov Charlie Baker, DOE’s Bruce Walker and former FERC Chair Norman Bay.

Senate Enviro to Look at States, Groundwater – The Senate Environment Committee holds a hearing at 10:00 a.m. on the role of States and the Federal government in protecting groundwater. Witnesses include Amanda Waters of the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, Indiana DEM assistant commissioner Martha Clark Mettler, Joe Guild if the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Southern Environmental Law Center’s Frank Holleman and Anthony Brown, CEO and principal hydrologist at Aquilogic.

Fanning, Others Headlines Geo Tech Energy Forum – Georgia Tech’s Strategic Energy Institute holds INTERSECT 2018 in Atlanta Wednesday and Thursday.  INTERSECT 2018 will address the challenge of Energy in an Information Age, specifically how the intersection of the digital and physical worlds are changing the energy landscape.  Speakers include Southern’s Tom Fanning New York Power Authority CEO Gil Quiniones and EPRI’s Mike Howard.

WCEE to Host Reporters – The Women’s Council on Energy & the Environment will host a brown bag lunch on Wednesday at Noon featuring a panel of energy journalists from E&E News, S&P Global Platts and Inside FERC to discuss the energy industry during the first year of the Trump Administration.  Our friends Pam King, Jasmin Melvin and Maya Weber will speak.

JHU to Host Russian Energy, Energy Efficiency Discussions – On Wednesday at 12:30 p.m., Johns Hopkins University’s European and Eurasian Studies Program hosts a Russia-Eurasia Forum on Russian Energy and European Politics with David Koranyi, Director of the Energy Diplomacy Initiative at the Atlantic Council. Moderated by Professor Charles Gati. Right after at 2:30, the JHU SAIS program will host alumnus Eric Gibbs, Chief Program Officer at CLASP, to discuss the role of efficient appliances in improving energy access and meeting climate mitigation goals. He will also introduce the Kigali Cooling Efficiency Program, which aims to significantly improve the efficiency and sustainability of air-conditioning and other cooling technologies. He will tell about CLASP’s work in this area and opportunities for SAIS students to engage. The discussion will be moderated by Johannes Urpelainen, the Prince Sultan bin Abdulaziz Professor of Energy, Resources and Environment and the Founding Direct of ISEP.

Tariff Opponents to Discuss Trump Action Impacts – Opponents of the steel and aluminum tariffs imposed by President Trump are holding a press event on Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. at the National Press Club’s Zenger Room.

Senate Energy to Look at Rural Power Issues – The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will examine energy-related challenges and opportunities in remote and rural areas during a hearing on Thursday at 10:00 a.m. NRECA member Matt Greek from Basin Electric and Doug Hardy of the Central Montana Electric Power will testify. Drawing from a newly released report, economist John Martin will reveal the downward effect of tariffs on steel capacity utilization on the sector. Economist Laura Baughman will detail the decline in U.S. manufacturing jobs that result from the Section 232 tariffs. Troy Roberts, CEO of Qualtek Manufacturing in Colorado Springs, Colorado, will describe the threat that cost increases for steel pose to the future of his business. The event will also mark the launch of the Coalition of American Metal Manufacturers and Users, comprised of small and medium U.S. manufacturing companies united in an effort to oppose the 25% tariff on steel imports.

Presentation to Look at NatGas Drilling Case Study – Johns Hopkins University SAIS Energy, Resources and Environment Program hosts another forum on Thursday at Noon on a case study of natgas drilling. “Oil and Gas Retrieval: Environmental Risks and Impacts on Water – An overview of conventional vs. unconventional retrieval, waste pits, TENORM, and case study on Colorado.”  Oil and gas retrieval of all kinds remains prevalent across the United States and the associated water risks are little understood.  This presentation highlights the little known impacts of oil and gas wastewater and radioactive materials, examines the validity of the conventional/unconventional dichotomy, and examines these issues in context in Colorado.

Lance, Banks, Brouillette Headline Columbia Energy Forum – On Thursday, the Columbia Global Energy Project will celebrate its 5th anniversary and host the annual Columbia Global Energy Summit.  The half-day forum will include keynote remarks, interviews and plenary conversations with senior energy sector leaders focused on key issues and questions at the intersection of energy policy, financial markets, the environment and geopolitics. CP CEO Ryan Lance does a keynote conversation with IHS-Markit’s Dan Yergin.  Other speakers include Dave Banks, Sun Power CEO Tom Werner, DOE’s Dan Brouillette, Pioneer Board Chair Scott Sheffield and IEA’s Fatih Birol.

US AID Focuses on Adaption – On Thursday at 4:30 p.m., the US AID ATLAS Project holds a forum on an idea known as “ecosystem-based adaptation” (EbA) which helps people adapt to weather and climate impacts.  USAID is completing a suite of resources on ecosystem-based adaptation that feature evidence summaries and case studies for applying these approaches to achieve development goals across sectors like agriculture, water, and disaster risk reduction. This session will highlight key messages from these resources as well as examples of EbA projects and approaches in the USAID context, while encouraging dialogue among participants about the use of EbA in their own work.

Brookings Hosts Discussion on Sustainable Financial Tools – On Friday morning, the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings will co-host a panel of development finance experts to discuss the implications of the European Investment Bank’s new bond product in support of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals in addressing climate change and other environmental challenges.  Following the conversation, panelists will take audience questions.

ELI hosts Climate Conference – On Friday, the Environmental Law Institute holds the 2nd National Conference of Lawyers Committed to Addressing the Climate Emergency at the George Washington University Law School  Topics to be discussed include filling the federal climate action gap, the economic risk and rewards of climate action, companies and NGOs taking action on climate change, state and local climate action strategies, climate litigation and taking action on the climate crisis?

Forum to Look at Korea NatGas – On Friday at 12:00 p.m., the Global America Business Institute hosts Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI researcher Ho-Mu Lee to discuss Korea’s current long-term natgas plan.   KEEI is a government-affiliated energy policy think tank. Dr. Lee has been worked at KEEI since 2008 and is currently a visiting scholar at George Washington University (2017-2018). Lee was head of KEEI’s Gas Policy Research Division from 2014 to 2017.

JHU to Discuss Renewable in PR – JHU’s SAIS program will host a forum on Friday at 12:30 p.m. the renewable energy future in Puerto Rico.  This presentation will explore new regulatory structures and policies that can incentivize the deployment of this clean and resilient energy infrastructure across the island of Puerto Rico.

Earth Day – Sunday April 22nd.

IN THE FUTURE

Fanning to Receive Leadership Award from Coaches – Southern CEO Tom Fanning will receive the CEO Coach of the Year award from the American Football Coaches Assn at a dinner at the Georgia Aquarium.  The award is the highest honor bestowed by the organization, whose inaugural recipient in 2006 was Jeffrey R. Immelt, former CEO of General Electric. Other former winners include former Domino’s Pizza CEO David Brandon (2007), former MidAmerican Energy Holdings CEO David Sokol (2008), former HP CEO Mark Hurd (2009), FedEx CEO Fred Smith (2010); BP Capital CEO T. Boone Pickens (2011); NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell (2012); former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson (2013), AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson (2014),  Berkshire Hathaway Energy head Greg Abel (2015) and former Honeywell Chairman and CEO David Cote (2016).

Refiners Security Conference Set – The annual AFPM Security Conference will be held on April 23-25 in New Orleans and presents current topics of vital importance to critical infrastructure, keeping security professionals up to date on security issues, policies, and future regulations. The event will relay the latest information on security regulations from DHS and the Coast Guard. This year’s conference will also go beyond just the regulations with sessions on hurricane response efforts, environmental NGO activism, cybersecurity and other emerging security and terror threats.

Wilson to Hosts Climate Book Launch – Next Tuesday at 3:00 p.m., the Woodrow Wilson Center hosts a book launch discussion with author Barry Rabe on pricing carbon. Climate change, economists generally agree, is best addressed by putting a price on the carbon content of fossil fuels—by taxing carbon, by cap-and-trade systems, or other methods. But what about the politics of carbon pricing? Do political realities render carbon pricing impracticable?  In this book, Barry Rabe offers the first major political science analysis of the feasibility and sustainability of carbon pricing, drawing upon a series of real-world attempts to price carbon over the last two decades in North America, Europe, and Asia.

JHU Hosts Forum on Resilient Infrastructure – Johns Hopkins University’s Energy, Resources and Environment (ERE) Global Leaders Forum hosts a presentation next Tuesday at 5:00 p.m. by the AECOM Practicum team looking at Cities as Innovation Centers.  The event will focus on investing in resilient Infrastructure,” followed by a panel discussion.  ERE’s Practicum students in partnership with the global engineering company AECOM are exploring the topic of climate risk and resilient infrastructure. This presentation and panel discussion will identify traditional barriers to investing in resilience and investigate best practices for implementing resilience.

Energy Happy Hour – The US Energy Economists in the National Capitol Area are co-hosting a Joint Happy Hour Event Next Tuesday at Dirty Martini with OurEnergyPolicy.org (OEP), which is a nonpartisan, nonprofit that has hosted more than 400 policy discussions over the past five years.

WRI Hosts Enviro Prize Winners – The World Resources Institute hosts a forum on Wednesday, April 25th at 11:30 a.m. which features an intimate conversation with 2018 Goldman Environmental Prize winners  The Goldman Environmental Prize, one of the most prestigious environmental awards, honors grassroots champions from six continents. The names of this year’s recipients will be announced on April 23rd.  After sharing their incredible stories, the Prize winners will join a Q&A discussion with the audience on environmental activism in the energy space, and regional approaches on the transition to clean energy.

Pruitt Heads to House Energy – The House Energy and Commerce Committee will host EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt on the agency’s budget request April 25th.

Forum to Look at Sustainable Investing – Bloomberg Government and the Norwegian-American Chamber of Commerce will host a series of in-depth conversations starting Wednesday April 25th at 3:30 p.m. on Investing in a Sustainable Energy Future driven by transformative technology innovations in renewable energy and a functioning trade system necessary to respond to the challenge of energy security and climate change.  Panelists will examine how government leaders and energy investors are putting policy and capital to work to transform the world’s energy sources and protect the environment.
Clean Power Plan Comment Deadline – April 26th

NAM to Host Event Focused Pushing on Kigali HFC Agreement – Stay tuned…

GMU Forum Looks at Energy-Water Nexus – The Center for Energy Science and Policy (CESP), a joint-initiative of the Schar School of Science and Policy and the College of Science at George Mason University, hosts the Mason Energy Symposium — “Energy-Water Nexus” on Thursday April 26th.  The event is the 2nd annual Mason Energy Symposium and is focused on the important nexus between energy and water. The event will advance understanding of the international and domestic aspects of the most basic and critical needs in the 21st century – abundant and reliable supply of water and energy. It will also explore the particular role of off-shore renewable (wind) energy and associated technologies.  The full-day event will feature three panels: Panel I on Offshore Renewable Energy; Panel II on the domestic and international aspects of the water and energy nexus; and Panel III on Mason Energy-Water research opportunities. The afternoon will provide Mason students and faculty opportunities to showcase their work relating to energy and water through presentations and posters.  The luncheon speaker will be Ambassador (ret) Mary Warlick, former Assistant Secretary in the Department of State’s Bureau of Energy Resources.

CSIS to Discuss Ukrainian Energy – The CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a discussion on April 26th featuring Ukrainian Parliament members Hanna Hopko and Nataliya Katser-Buchkovska on Ukrainian energy market reform, how external forces impact reforms, and Ukraine’s role in European energy security.  A properly-functioning energy sector would not only contribute to domestic prosperity and stability but convert Ukraine from a perceived liability into an asset for Europe’s energy security.  The speakers will help us understand this challenging situation and offer suggestions on how to move energy reform forward.

USEA Focus on Plain Project – The U.S. Energy Association hosts a forum on Thursday April 26th at 10:00 a.m. on the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, as part of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) Initiative run by DOE.  The project aims to foster the deployment of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) across a large area in the central interior of the United States and Canada. Using an adaptive management approach (AMA) to the assessment of carbon dioxide (CO2) geologic storage, the PCOR Partnership has demonstrated that secure storage can be achieved in association with CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations.

ITIF, MIT Report to Release Report on Energy Storage – On Thursday, April 26th at 1:30 p.m., the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation hosts the release of a new report produced in collaboration with the MIT Energy Initiative on Grid-scale Energy Storage. The report’s authors, ITIF Senior Fellow David M. Hart and MIT Professor Bill Bonvillian, will present their findings and discuss policy options to spur grid-scale storage innovation with an expert panel.

Water Symposium to Feature Perdue, Vilsack – Colorado State University hosts a “Water in the West” Symposium on April 26 & 27th featuring experts, policymakers, researchers, and investors.  The event features the latest around water challenges, collaborate with experts, and create a roadmap for water research, innovation, education, and policy.  The Symposium will take place at the Water Resources Center, the first building to be constructed at the future National Western Center, a 250-acre redevelopment in north Denver. More than 20 confirmed expert speakers to-date including Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, and Tom Vilsack, Former Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

WCEE Hosts FERC Discussion – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) hosts a lunch discussion on Friday April 27th at FERC on the fundamental economics and basic mathematics behind wholesale electricity market pricing, known as Locational Marginal Prices. FERC staff Robin Broder Hytowitz will provide an overview of electricity pricing focusing on broad concepts that apply to all ISOs/RTOs. The overview will explain the concepts behind Locational Marginal Prices, uplift, and an extension used in some wholesale markets today.

WH Correspondents Dinner Set for April 28th – The White House Correspondents’ Association hosts its annual dinner on Saturday, April 28 featuring comedian Michelle Wolf as the entertainer.  Wolf is the host of a newly announced show on Netflix, which comes on the heels of her highly reviewed HBO special. She is also known for her acclaimed work as a contributor on Comedy Central’s Daily Show With Trevor Noah.  President Trump has said he will not attend.

MI Innovation Council to Hold Meeting – Michigan Energy Innovation Business Council holds its 6th Annual conference on Monday, April 30 at the Radisson Hotel Lansing at the Capitol. The full-day conference focuses on innovations in advanced energy, as well as get an overview on the latest policy developments. There will be several break-out panels throughout the day featuring dozens of expert panelists. The event brings together leaders in Michigan’s advanced energy industry, utility executives, policymakers, regulators, and others.

Forum to Look at Climate, Conservative Views – On Monday April 30th, the Columbia Center for Global Energy hosts an event on conservative prescriptions on climate change.  As part of its continuing series “Where Next on Climate?” the Center on Global Energy Policy will host a program focusing on conservative prescriptions to deal with climate change. Dr. Glenn Hubbard, Dean of the Columbia Business School and former chair of the Council of Economic Advisors under President George W. Bush, will offer opening remarks, then lead a panel discussion with our friend Rich Powell of ClearPath, John Diamond of Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy and Lynne Kiesling of Purdue University and R Street Institute.

NHA holds Washington Waterpower Week – The National Hydropower Assn holds Waterpower Week in Washington on April 30 to May 2nd.  Waterpower Week is comprised of three co-located conferences rolled into one: NHA’s Annual Conference, International Marine Renewable Energy Conference (IMREC), and Marine Energy Technology Symposium (METS). This 3-day jam packed event provides you the opportunity to network, learn about legislative and regulatory initiatives, and discuss the issues impacting hydropower and marine energy industry.

Solar Summit Set for SD – GTM’s Solar Summit 2018 will be held in San Diego on May 1st and 2nd at the Hyatt La Jolla.  This conference will present deep dives by the top industry executives and thought leaders that will help you navigate the challenges in the market.  SEIA’s Abby Hopper and former Governator Cal EPA head Terry Tamminen are among the list of speakers.

WINDPOWER Set for Chicago – The American Wind Energy Assn (AWEA) will hold WINDPOWER 2018 in Chicago from May 7th to 10th.  The industry closed 2017 strong, delivering 7,017 megawatts (MW) of new wind power capacity. That new capacity represents $11 billion in new private investment. There are now 89,077 MW of wind power installed across 41 states, enough to power 26 million American homes.  The wind industry is expected to continue its growth into 2018. WINDPOWER is where the industry comes together to plan for the future and keep this success story growing.

OPIS Looks at West Coast Fuel Supply – OPIS holds a forum in Napa Valley at the Silverado Resort on May 9th and 10th looking at West Coast fuel supplies and transportation opportunities.  Industry experts will examine the impact of new players in the Western markets, opportunities that California assets can offer, carbon emissions regulations, renewable fuels, plus get an exclusive technical analysis of West Coast spot market prices.

Hydrogen, Fuel Cell Forum Set for DC – The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association will be hosting a full-day forum and exposition on Tuesday, June 12 in Washington, D.C. at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center with leading executives, experts, and policymakers on fuel cell and hydrogen technology. The forum will bring together key federal and state policymakers, including the Department of Energy and White House, as well as the broader environmental, transportation, and energy communities to raise awareness of the benefits of fuel cell and hydrogen technology. This event will precede the Department of Energy’s 2018 Annual Merit Review.

Young Professional Program for World Gas Forum Set – The Young Professionals Program (YPP) will hold a special forum during the World Gas Conference June 25-29 in Washington, DC.  YPP will provide a great opportunity for promising young professionals in the energy sector to learn from top leaders in the natural gas industry and network with their peers throughout the world.  More on this as we get closer.

Clean Energy Forum on Schedule – The 2018 Congressional Clean Energy Expo and Policy Forum will be held on July 10th and brings together up to 45-55 businesses, trade associations, and government agencies to showcase renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

Energy Update: Week of April 9

Friends,

I launch today on the 18th anniversary of one of SNL’s best sketches EVER: Christopher Walken and “More Cowbell.” I’ve got fever… and the prescription is

What an end to the Masters as Patrick Reed held off the charging Rickie Fowler and Jordan Spieth to win his first Major. Reed, often seen as one of golf’s villains, fought hard down the stretch, holing a four-footer on 18 for the Green Jacket.  Minnesota-Duluth also held off Notre Dame on Saturday 2-1 to win the NCAA Ice hockey championship in St. Paul. And with the Frozen Four results in, focus now turns to our favorite team of the Year: NHL hockey playoffs!!  Caps start with Columbus on Thursday, while the Pittsburgh-Philly series, which starts Wednesday, may be the best of the first round.  Nashville took the President Cup and is well-positioned for another Cup run, but also watch out for Vegas who finished with a strong 109 Points.

And don’t miss this:  the 33rd Annual Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, will take place on Saturday in Cleveland with Bon Jovi, Dire Straits, the Cars, The Moody Blues, Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Nina Simone heading in. HBO televises the event later this month.

Congress returns to action after a two-week district work period with its biggest focus on Facebook as Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify.  But with the flurry of EPA/Pruitt news, the expected vote this week for EPA Deputy Andy Wheeler will be interesting to watch. Already, Democratic Sens. Heitkamp and Manchin have said they would support Wheeler with other keys to watch including Sens. Collins, Connelly, McCaskill and Tester. On the Budget, Energy Secretary Rick Perry testifies twice this week on Wednesday and Thursday, while Interior’s Ryan Zinke talks budget Wednesday and NOAA hit the Congress.

Other hearings next week including tomorrow’s Senate Enviro’s look at state views of cooperative Federalism.  On Wednesday, the Whitehouse-Barrasso Carbon Capture bill gets a legislative hearing, while the House Energy Committee restarts its postponed Puerto Rico grid recovery hearing.  On Thursday House Resources looks at the Navajo Generating coal plant impacts and Senate Commerce looks at hurricane prep for 2018.  Finally on Friday, House Energy looks at fuels and high octane as a means of addressing CAFE standards.

Other events this week include the BNEF Energy Summit today, tomorrow and Wednesday in NYC with DOE’s Perry, SEIA’s Abby Hopper and SoCo’s Tom Fanning headlining.  SAFE holds a fuel economy event tomorrow at the Willard quantifying the fuel efficiency benefits of emerging AV technologies.  On Thursday USEA holds its annual policy forum at the Reagan Center and US Energy Economists holds its annual Washington energy policy conference at the Press Club.

Finally, we have all seen reports that the White House will hold another meeting on the RFS program.  We are monitoring and will report when we hear what results.

Call with questions.  Best,

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

c. (202) 997-5932

 

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“The reasons the media and their Resistance followers hate Pruitt are the same reasons conservatives love him and why conservatives are willing to support Trump. No, the reason is not that he got approval from a career ethics official to rent a room for a few months last year. Let’s stop pretending so. If Trump were to fulfill the Resistance’s desire to oust Pruitt, it would be against his own political interest. His instincts about that tend to be pretty sharp, so don’t be surprised if Pruitt continues to serve and continues to anger the media and other Democrats and establishment figures.”

Mollie Z. Hemingway, Senior Editor at The Federalist on EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt

“Obviously, he is an ideal administrator.”
Tom Pyle, who heads the American Energy Alliance, an influential free-market advocacy group, discussing Pruitt’s supporters’ efforts to keep him at EPA’s helm

 

ON THE POD

Bracewell Podcast Focuses on Trade – The latest Bracewell podcast is live on Stitcher, iTunes, SoundCloud, and Google Play Music. Josh and Liam discuss the latest news on steel and aluminum tariffs and trade war threats as well as what these tariffs mean politically, specifically for the upcoming Midterms in November. We wrap up on the lighter topic of baseball season and breaking out binders of trading cards.

GTM Podcast Looks at Carbon, 202 Emergencies, CAFE – The Energy Gang, a Greentech Media podcast, explores 3 big topics: recent data showing global CO2 emissions are rising again; FirstEnergy Solutions bankruptcy and plea for DOE market intervention; and EPA’s move to weaken auto mileage rules for model years 2022–2025.

FUN OPINIONS

WSJ Weighs in on Pruitt Controversy – With the flood of Pruitt coverage over the last few days, the Wall Street Journal editorial page weighed in on the controversy saying Pruitt’s real sin is that he is one of Mr. Trump’s most aggressive reformers, taking on green idols that others would bow before. In a year he has rescinded the waters of the U.S. rule that sought to regulate every pond in America; proposed to repeal the Clean Power Plan rule that sought to put coal out of business; urged the President to withdraw from the Paris climate pact; made a priority of cleaning up genuine pollution problems like Superfund sites; and this week began revising the destructive Obama-era fuel-economy standards.  If there has been a more consequential cabinet official, we haven’t seen him.

IN THE NEWS

Vistra-Dynergy Merger Completed – Vistra Energy Corp, the parent company for TXU Energy and Luminant, today completed its previously announced merger with Dynegy.  The closing of the transaction follows the overwhelming approval from stockholders of both Vistra and Dynegy in March, and the receipt of all required regulatory approvals. Vistra Energy will be the name of the combined company moving forward, and the combined company’s stock will continue to trade on the New York Stock Exchange under the current ticker symbol for Vistra Energy.  The combination of Dynegy’s generation capacity and existing retail footprint with Vistra Energy’s integrated ERCOT model creates the lowest-cost integrated power company in the industry and positions the combined company as the leading integrated retail and generation platform throughout key competitive power markets in the United States.  With the transaction complete, Vistra Energy now:

  • Employs about 6,000 people across 12 states.
  • Serves approximately 2.7 million residential customers in five top retail states.
  • Serves approximately 240,000 commercial and industrial retail customers.
  • Owns approximately 40,000 megawatts of installed generation capacity.
  • Has power generation capacity that is more than 60 percent natural gas-fueled, with 84 percent located within the ERCOT, PJM, and ISO-NE competitive power markets.
  • Projects that it will produce approximately 50 percent of gross margin from more stable capacity payments and retail operations, as well as approximately 50 percent of adjusted EBITDA from the ERCOT market.

Administration MOU Streamlines Infrastructure – Trump Administration officials a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) committing to follow the President’s One Federal Decision framework for processing environmental reviews and permits for major infrastructure projects. Under the direction of President Donald J. Trump, One Federal Decision will drive infrastructure projects to meet environmental standards, but complete the review and permitting process in a reasonable amount of time.

Chamber Supports MOU – Neil Bradley, executive vice president and chief policy officer for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce: “The U.S. Chamber has taken a leading role for years in the effort to streamline the permitting process. Bringing infrastructure projects to completion quickly and efficiently is critical for generating economic growth, which is why we made permit streamlining a cornerstone of our infrastructure plan. Simply put, it shouldn’t take longer to approve a project than to build it. Environmental reviews are crucial to ensuring clean air and water, but it’s possible and necessary for the reviews to be completed in a more timely manner. We welcome the administration’s commitment to One Federal Decision and applaud it as a much-needed step in the process to modernize America’s infrastructure. We’re eager to see more of this kind of reform-minded progress from the administration and Congress in the weeks and months to come.”  For more information about the U.S. Chamber’s infrastructure plan, please click here.

10 Teams Advance to Finals of $20M NRG Carbon XPRIZE –  XPRIZE, the world’s leader in designing and managing incentive competitions to solve humanity’s grand challenges, today announced the 10 teams advancing to the final round in the $20M NRG COSIA Carbon XPRIZE. This four-and-a-half-year global competition challenges teams to transform the way the world addresses carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions through breakthrough circular carbon technologies that convert carbon dioxide emissions from power plants into valuable products. The 10 finalists, each taking home an equal share of a $5 million milestone prize, were revealed today at Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s Future of Energy Summit in New York City. Ranging from carbon capture entrepreneurs and start-ups to academic institutions and companies that have been tackling the challenge for more than a decade, the finalists hail from five countries and have already demonstrated conversion of CO2 into a wide variety of products, such as enhanced concrete, liquid fuels, plastics and carbon fiber. The universe of potential CO2-based products crosses a variety of energy sectors, industrial processes and consumer products. Each finalist team passed a first round evaluation based on the amount of CO2 converted into products, as well as the economic value, market size and CO2 uptake potential of those products.

Powell Explains CleanTech Innovation Needs – ClearPath Executive Director Rich Powell in his most recent digital whiteboard video explains why “moonshot” clean energy technology goals would similarly allow the U.S. to catch up with China by focusing Department of Energy priorities and resources on the biggest breakthroughs in advanced nuclear, carbon capture, grid-scale storage, solar and other advanced technologies.  Watch Rich – in less than four minutes – sum up his appearance this year before the House Energy and Commerce Committee with the help of ClearPath graphics wizard Mitch Kersey. The optimistic takeaway message: While the U.S. may not be able to compete with China in cranes and concrete, setting moonshot energy technology goals can help ensure U.S. leadership in innovation and deployment.

Report: Global Wind Capacity to Double – A new report from MAKE Consulting says global wind capacity is expected to double by 2027, despite a significant a slowdown in U.S. installations after 2022 due to the Production Tax Credit phase out.  New projections from MAKE Consulting show wind power additions averaging 65 gigawatts a year from 2018 to 2027, equal to a compound annual growth rate of 4%.  Beyond 2023, increasing offshore deployment and “sustained momentum” from emerging markets will contribute to a second period of growth of upward of 30% a year.  Annual installed capacity in the U.S., one of the world’s top three wind markets in 2017, is expected to see an average threefold decrease from 2022 to 2027 compared to the four years prior, after the Production Tax Credit is phased out.  Capacity additions in India will help boost the short-term outlook for wind energy growth, while Chinese installation levels are set to pick up once present transmission and curtailment issues have been sorted out.

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Perdue, Senators Headline NRECA Conference – The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association holds its 2018 Legislative Conference today and tomorrow in DC.  More than 2,000 electric co-op representatives will attend. Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue, Senate Energy Chairman Lisa Murkowski, Senate Ag Chair Pat Roberts and Sen. Jimi Inhofe are among those speaking.

Perry, Fanning to Headline BNEF Energy Summit – Bloomberg New Energy Finance will hold its annual Energy Summit In New York today and tomorrow.  The Future of Energy Summit has featured a unique convergence of the old and the new – traditional players and advanced-energy leaders. It continues to create an environment for making new connections, and serves as a forum to discuss the critical energy issues of today and the next decade.  DOE’s Rick Perry will headline the forum.  Other speakers include Southern’s Tom Fanning, SEIA’s Abby Hopper, DOE’s Edward McGinnis,  former EPA head Lisa Jackson and many others.

IPAA Hold NY Oil, Gas Summit – The Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA) will hold the 24th annual Oil & Gas Investment Symposium (OGIS) in New York today and tomorrow at the Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel.

Platts Power Market Conference Set – Platts holds its 33rd Annual Global Power Markets Conference today, tomorrow and Wednesday in Las Vegas at the Wynn.

FERC Holds Distributed Energy Conference – Tomorrow and Wednesday, FERC holds a technical Conference to discuss the participation of aggregated distribution-level power supplies in wholesale markets and consider how the generation will be integrated by the regional system operators. The conference comes as system managers from New York ISO to California ISO have begun to eliminate regulatory barriers faced by swelling supplies of customer-sited renewables.

Atlantic Report to Look at Oil Theft – Tomorrow at 9:00 a.m., the Atlantic Council holds a forum and releases new report on oil and fuel theft. “Oil on the Water: Illicit Hydrocarbons Activity in the Maritime Domain” report authors Dr. Ralby and Dr. Soud will provide an overview of the report, after which panelists will discuss the various modalities of oil theft in the maritime domain and what steps companies, policymakers, and other stakeholders can take to combat it.

EIA to Release Summer Fuels Outlook – Tomorrow morning, The U.S. Energy Information Administration will issue its Summer Fuels Outlook, with price projections for gasoline, diesel, and electricity, and the Short-Term Energy Outlook report, providing a forecast of energy supply, demand, and prices.

SAFE Hold Forum on Auto Efficiencies – Tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. at The Willard Hotel, Securing America’s Future Energy will hold a forum on Vehicle fuel issues. SAFE has identified a path forward that meets the interests of all stakeholders by reforming the off-cycle credit program to create an opportunity for automakers to accelerate initial mass deployment while quantifying the fuel efficiency benefits of emerging autonomous vehicle technologies and other advanced driver assist systems. Integrating these technologies into the fuel economy regime, along with extending the timeline of the standards, enables the federal government to save lives, save fuel, and create the regulatory certainty that automakers need to achieve fuel efficiency goals. Join us for this exciting conversation.  The expert panel will former Director of National Intelligence Admiral Dennis Blair, Tom Darlington of the Air Improvement Resource and Mobileye’s Gene Gurevich. SAFE’s Amitai Bin-Nun will make opening remarks.

Senate Enviro to Look at Cooperative Federalism – The Senate Environment Committee holds a hearing tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. on cooperative Federalism under the Clean Air Act, looking at state perspectives. Witnesses include Kentucky DEP director Sean Alteri, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality commissioner Toby Baker, Delaware DNREC secretary Shaun Garvin, Cal EPA Secretary Matthew Rodriguez and Wyoming DEQ administrator Nancy Vehr.

GU Forum to Feature World Bank Expert –Tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. at Georgetown’s Walsh School of Foreign Service, the Mortara Center will hold an energy and climate policy research seminar featuring the World Bank’s Stephane Hallegatte.  He will discuss measuring resilience to natural disasters.

McCarthy Headlines Forum – The World Resources Institute and the National Geographic Society are hosting an event on Wednesday at 9:00 a.m. looking at how current trends in data, technology, media and human networks can inform decision-making around natural resources.  The event features keynote speeches by Former Astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison and former EPA head Gina McCarthy, as well as speakers representing government, technology, science and media.

Carbon Capture Bill to Get Senate Enviro Hearing – The Senate Environment Committee is holding a hearing Wednesday at 10:15 a.m. to discuss the Barrasso-Whitehouse bipartisan bill, S. 2602, the “Utilizing Significant Emissions With Innovative Technologies (USE IT) Act.” to make several changes to federal law, including amending the Clean Air Act to direct U.S. EPA in supporting carbon utilization and air capture research.  Sens. Capito and Heitkamp are also co-sponsors.  Witnesses include U Wyoming School of Energy Resources director Mark Northam, former Obama DOE official Julio Friedmann, Noah Deich, of the Center for Carbon Removal and UDelaware prof Feng Jiao.

Zinke Heads to House Approps Subpanel – The House Appropriations Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee holds a hearing on hearing on Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. addressing the FY2019 Interior budget.” Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke testifies.

NOAA Budget Under Microscope – The House Approps Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Subcommittee holds a hearing on the FY2019 NOAA Budget Wednesday at 2:00 p.m.

House Energy Looks at Puerto Rico Grid Recovery – Also at 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, the House Energy and Commerce Oversight Subcommittee returns to a hearing that was postponed previously on restoration of Puerto Rico’s Electric Infrastructure. Witnesses include DOE’s Bruce Walker, Charles Alexander of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, FEMA’s Jeffrey Byard, Navigant’s Gene Shlatz and EEI’s Carlos Torres.

Eni Head to Address Forum – Wednesday at 5:00 p.m., the Atlantic Council hosts a conversation with Mr. Claudio Descalzi, Chief Executive Officer of Eni, as part of the Global Energy Center’s CEO Series. Eni is a leader in oil and gas development all over the world and has adopted a bold, comprehensive strategy to respond to an increasingly complex energy system. Mr. Descalzi will discuss how Eni is navigating the profound structural changes in the energy system, including the future of the oil industry, the role of OPEC and US shale in shaping the market, and the significance of potential gas development in the Eastern Mediterranean.

Columbia to host JHU Book Author – The Columbia Center on Global Energy Policy will hold a book talk on Wednesday at 6:00 p.m. in NYC with JHU’s Dr. Johannes Urpelainen on his new book, Renewables: The Politics of a Global Energy Transition where he and co-author Michaël Aklin offer a comprehensive political analysis of the rapid growth in renewable wind and solar power. Following Dr. Urpelainen’s presentation, he will be joined by Shayle Kann, CGEP Non-Resident Fellow and Senior Vice President of Research and Strategy at Energy Impact Partners and Bloomberg New Energy Finance’s Colleen Regan at for a discussion on renewable energy deployment more broadly including cost declines, power sector economics, carbon markets, and climate-finance. CGEP Inaugural Fellow, David Sandalow will moderate.

USEA Hosts Annual Policy Forum – The U.S. Energy Association is hosting its annual membership meeting and policy forum on Thursday at the Reagan Trade Center. Over 150 USEA members and other energy stakeholders, including Administration officials, thought leaders, lawmakers, diplomats, and journalists come together to discuss the latest energy policy developments and share industry updates.

Energy Economists Hold Conference – The National capital area chapter of the US Association for Energy Economics holds its annual NCAC-USAEE conference on Thursday at GW University.  The keynoters are Gil Quiniones, CEO of NYPA, Dynegy’s Pat Wood, ClearView’s Kevin Book and Mark Mills of the Manhattan Institute.

House Approps Hosts MilCon Heads – The House Appropriations Committee’s Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies will convene a FY 19 Budget Oversight Hearing on Energy, Installations, and Environment on Thursday. Witnesses Lucian Niemeyer, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations, and Environment – OSD; Lieutenant General Gwen Bingham, Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management – U.S. Army; Vice Admiral Dixon R. Smith, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, Fleet Readiness and Logistics –Navy; Major General Vincent A. Coglianese, Commander, Marine Corps Installations Command and Assistant Deputy Commandant, Installations and Logistics (Facilities) – U.S. Marine Corps ; and Major General Timothy S. Green, Air Force Director of Civil Engineers, Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, Engineering and Force Protection –USAF.

Perry to Head to House Energy Panel – The House Energy and Commerce Committee today announced Energy Secretary Rick Perry will testify before the Energy subcommittee on Thursday on Budget and oversight hearings.

Senate Commerce Panel Examines 2018 Hurricane Preparations – A Senate Commerce panel will hold a hearing on Thursday at 9:45 to look at whether the federal government is prepared for the 2018 hurricane season.  Senators plan to examine both how local and federal agencies are dealing with the recovery from the 2017 Atlantic hurricanes and what’s being done to prepare for this year. Witnesses include Commerce’s assistant secretary for oceans and atmosphere Timothy Gallaudet, Marathon, FL city manager Chuck Lindsey, Mississippi Development Authority official Jamie Miller, Jennifer Pipa of the American Red Cross of Central Florida, USCG Rear Adm. Linda Fagan and Bella Dinh-Zarr of the National Transportation Safety Board.

House Resources to Look at NavGen Plant – The House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources will hold a hearing on Thursday at 10:00 a.m. on the “benefits” of the Navajo Generation Station for local communities on the Navajo reservation.  NGS will begin decommissioning at the end of 2019, barring a new buyer or government intervention. Witnesses are expected to include Hopi Tribe Chair Tim Nuvangyaoma, Navajo Council Speaker Lorenzo Bates, AZ State Rep. Mark Finchem and several others.

DOE Officials Headline Energy Communities Meeting – The 2018 Energy Communities Alliance annual conference will be held on Thursday at the Liaison Hotel.  The meeting will focus on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices of Environmental Management, Nuclear Energy, and the National Nuclear Security Administration.  Meeting attendees will have the unique opportunity to hear from DOE officials, key Members of Congress and Congressional staff, and other DC insiders.  Speakers include DOE’s Science head Paul Dabbar, DOE Nuclear head Ed McGinnis, House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus Chair Chuck Fleischmann (R-TN) NNSA’s Nora Khalil and several others.

JHU Features Canadian NatGas Energy Forum – Ahead of the World Gas Conference being hosted in Washington this June, the Canadian Gas Association is sponsoring a half-day conference on Friday looking at the challenges and opportunities for Canada’s natural gas sector and their implications for the United States. The event is being hosted by Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. Energy sector experts representing the academic, public and private sectors assess the challenges and opportunities in the Canadian market, including technology, export market changes, infrastructure, carbon pricing and social license and  aboriginal consent in the context of the changes occurring in the United States, Canada’s largest energy export destination.  Topics addressed by speakers will include U.S. and Canadian energy policy priorities, whether Canada and the United States will become Partners or Rivals in Global Markets, and natural gas opportunities and how Canadian firms are responding.

Chicago Booth to Hold Energy Forward Conference – The University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business holds its flagship Energy Forward conference on Friday to examine the trends and opportunities that are defining both the conventional and alternative energy markets this year.  Speakers will include Invenergy’s Michael Polsky, Jeffrey Currie of Goldman Sachs and Nextera Energy’s Michael O’Sullivan. Topics and questions addressed will include: the outlook for US oil markets with the surge in shale, strategies to deploy capital in the risky environment facing the oil & gas sector right now, the impact of electric vehicles on the energy sector, restructuring merchant power generation, and examining what an energy utopia would look like.

House Energy Panel look at Fuels – The House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment will hold a hearing at 9:00 a.m. on Friday to look into high-octane fuel, hybrid engines and autonomous cars.  Lawmakers will study how a transition to high-octane fuels would impact a variety of interests, including refiners, biofuel producers, automakers, fuel retailers and consumers.  Among the witnesses, we her will include corn growers, AFPM, auto manufacturer technical folks and retailers like NACS.

FEMA Budget Discussed – The House Appropriations panel on Homeland Security holds a Budget hearing on Friday at 11:00 a.m. looking at FEMA’s FY2019 Budget.

IN THE FUTURE

Chamber Holds Tax Event – On Tax Day Tuesday April 17th, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce will host a forum featuring Sen. Pat Toomey to address discuss the benefits of the recently enacted tax reform legislation.  There will also be panels featuring energy issues.

FERC Commissioner Head to House Energy – The House Energy and Commerce Committee panel on energy will host all FERC commissioners to testify on April 17th on budget issues.

AEI to Host Discussion on Climate Lawsuits – AEI will hold a forum on Tuesday, April 17th at 1:30 p.m. for a discussion on the legal and scientific issues raised by the lawsuits against major fossil-fuel producers and the underlying implications for the municipal bond market. Speakers will include Niskanen’s David Bookbinder, Andrew Grossman of BakerHostetler, Michael MacCracken of the Climate Institute, Cato’s Patrick J. Michaels, Stephen Winterstein of Wilmington Trust Investment Advisors and AEI’s Ben Zycher.

Forum to Look at Future of Renewables – POLITICO hosts a happy hour deep-dive conversation on April 17th at 5:00 p.m. looking at how private businesses are stepping up to address the future of clean energy and how they can work with the government to build a more sustainable future. FERC’s Neil Chatterjee, Sen. Michael Bennet and ACORE’s Greg Wetstone will speak.

Tariff Opponents to Discuss Trump Action Impacts – Opponents of the steel and aluminum tariffs imposed by President Trump are holding a press event on Wednesday April 18th at 2:00 p.m. at the National Press Club’s Zenger Room.  More on this next week.

Earth Day – Sunday April 22nd.

Fanning to Receive Leadership Award from Coaches – Southern CEO Tom Fanning will receive the CEO Coach of the Year award from the American Football Coaches Assn at a dinner at the Georgia Aquarium.  The award is the highest honor bestowed by the organization, whose inaugural recipient in 2006 was Jeffrey R. Immelt, former CEO of General Electric. Other former winners include former Domino’s Pizza CEO David Brandon (2007), former MidAmerican Energy Holdings CEO David Sokol (2008), former HP CEO Mark Hurd (2009), FedEx CEO Fred Smith (2010); BP Capital CEO T. Boone Pickens (2011); NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell (2012); former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson (2013), AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson (2014),  Berkshire Hathaway Energy head Greg Abel (2015) and former Honeywell Chairman and CEO David Cote (2016).

Refiners Security Conference Set – The annual will be held on April 23-25 in New Orleans and presents current topics of vital importance to critical infrastructure, keeping security professionals up to date on security issues, policies, and future regulations. The event will relay the latest information on security regulations from DHS and the Coast Guard. This year’s conference will also go beyond just the regulations with sessions on hurricane response efforts, environmental NGO activism, cybersecurity and other emerging security and terror threats.

Pruitt Heads to House Energy – The House Energy and Commerce Committee will host EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt on the agency’s budget request April 25th.

Clean Power Plan Comment Deadline – April 26th

CSIS to Discuss Ukrainian Energy – The CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a discussion on April 26th featuring Ukrainian Parliament members Hanna Hopko and Nataliya Katser-Buchkovska on Ukrainian energy market reform, how external forces impact reforms, and Ukraine’s role in European energy security.  A properly-functioning energy sector would not only contribute to domestic prosperity and stability but convert Ukraine from a perceived liability into an asset for Europe’s energy security.  The speakers will help us understand this challenging situation and offer suggestions on how to move energy reform forward.

Water Symposium to Feature Perdue, Vilsack – Colorado State University hosts a “Water in the West” Symposium on April 26 & 27th featuring experts, policymakers, researchers, and investors.  The event features the latest around water challenges, collaborate with experts, and create a roadmap for water research, innovation, education, and policy.  The Symposium will take place at the Water Resources Center, the first building to be constructed at the future National Western Center, a 250-acre redevelopment in north Denver. More than 20 confirmed expert speakers to-date including Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, and Tom Vilsack, Former Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

WH Correspondents Dinner Set for April 28th – The White House Correspondents’ Association hosts its annual dinner on Saturday, April 28 featuring comedian Michelle Wolf as the entertainer.  Wolf is the host of a newly announced show on Netflix, which comes on the heels of her highly reviewed HBO special. She is also known for her acclaimed work as a contributor on Comedy Central’s Daily Show With Trevor Noah.  President Trump has said he will not attend.

MI Innovation Council to Hold Meeting – Michigan Energy Innovation Business Council holds its 6th Annual conference on Monday, April 30 at the Radisson Hotel Lansing at the Capitol. The full-day conference focuses on innovations in advanced energy, as well as get an overview on the latest policy developments. There will be several break-out panels throughout the day featuring dozens of expert panelists. The event brings together leaders in Michigan’s advanced energy industry, utility executives, policymakers, regulators, and others.

NHA holds Washington Waterpower Week – The National Hydropower Assn holds Waterpower Week in Washington on April 30 to May 2nd.  Waterpower Week is comprised of three co-located conferences rolled into one: NHA’s Annual Conference, International Marine Renewable Energy Conference (IMREC), and Marine Energy Technology Symposium (METS). This 3-day jam packed event provides you the opportunity to network, learn about legislative and regulatory initiatives, and discuss the issues impacting hydropower and marine energy industry.

Solar Summit Set for SD – GTM’s Solar Summit 2018 will be held in San Diego on May 1st and 2nd at the Hyatt La Jolla.  This conference will present deep dives by the top industry executives and thought leaders that will help you navigate the challenges in the market.  SEIA’s Abby Hopper and former Governator Cal EPA head Terry Tamminen are among the list of speakers.

WINDPOWER Set for Chicago – The American Wind Energy Assn (AWEA) will hold WINDPOWER 2018 in Chicago from May 7th to 10th.  The industry closed 2017 strong, delivering 7,017 megawatts (MW) of new wind power capacity. That new capacity represents $11 billion in new private investment. There are now 89,077 MW of wind power installed across 41 states, enough to power 26 million American homes.  The wind industry is expected to continue its growth into 2018. WINDPOWER is where the industry comes together to plan for the future and keep this success story growing.

OPIS Looks at West Coast Fuel Supply – OPIS holds a forum in Napa Valley at the Silverado Resort on May 9th and 10th looking at West Coast fuel supplies and transportation opportunities.  Industry experts will examine the impact of new players in the Western markets, opportunities that California assets can offer, carbon emissions regulations, renewable fuels, plus get an exclusive technical analysis of West Coast spot market prices.

Hydrogen, Fuel Cell Forum Set for DC – The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association will be hosting a full-day forum and exposition on Tuesday, June 12 in Washington, D.C. at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center with leading executives, experts, and policymakers on fuel cell and hydrogen technology. The forum will bring together key federal and state policymakers, including the Department of Energy and White House, as well as the broader environmental, transportation, and energy communities to raise awareness of the benefits of fuel cell and hydrogen technology. This event will precede the Department of Energy’s 2018 Annual Merit Review.

Young Professional Program for World Gas Forum Set – The Young Professionals Program (YPP) will hold a special forum during the World Gas Conference June 25-29 in Washington, DC.  YPP will provide a great opportunity for promising young professionals in the energy sector to learn from top leaders in the natural gas industry and network with their peers throughout the world.  More on this as we get closer.

Clean Energy Forum on Schedule – The 2018 Congressional Clean Energy Expo and Policy Forum will be held on July 10th and brings together up to 45-55 businesses, trade associations, and government agencies to showcase renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

Energy Update: Week of March 12

Friends,

I always hate losing an hour of sleep when we spring forward.  Props our friend Andy Black who posted a lucid objection on Facebook to changing our clocks twice a year.  We need that extra hour of sleep for March Madness.

Yes, March Madness is here and with yesterday’s selection show now is the time to make your picks. Thursday at Noon is when ALL the action starts.  It is among my favorite times of the year because my office TV will be set for hoops on Thursday at noon.

The play-in games begin tomorrow with Radford taking on LIU-Brooklyn and UCLA playing St Bonaventure.  Wednesday’s play-ins feature Arizona State and Syracuse and NC Central and Texas Southern.  Top seeds are Virginia, Villanova, Kansas and Xavier.

There is real science to picking winners in the pool, but over the years I’ve realized that most of it is just good luck. If you’re looking for some sleepers, here are a few you may want to consider: Providence has been hot lately but is a 10-seed, as is Butler who has made deep runs in past years. San Diego State is solid 11-seed as is Loyola (IL) while a good 12-seed is New Mexico State. You also may want to look at Davidson another 12-seed who has plenty of tourney experience, gets a young/inconsistent Kentucky team and just beat Rhode Island for the A-10 title right here in Capital One Arena.  Also the Bobby Hurley-led Arizona State Sun Devils struggled of late but let off the season with early big wins over #1 seeds Kansas and Xavier and could be a factor.

Some mid-level seeds that you should keep an eye on include last year’s NIT champ Texas Tech, a very good West Virginia team, #7 seed Nevada, a Houston crew that battled for the American Conference title and sleepy but skilled URI crew led by Danny Hurley.

Purdue was on fire down the stretch and Is a #2 and Duke is as solid as ever.  Finally I’d say watch out for Hardy perennials like Arizona, Gonzaga, Kentucky, Michigan State and Michigan.

And don’t sleep on the women’s tourney which will have its selection show tonight. UConn, Baylor, So Carolina, Notre Dame and Mississippi State all in the running.  As well, NCAA Wrestling starts this week as well.  Penn State, Ohio State, Iowa, Missouri and Lehigh among the powerhouses.

Good luck and remember I’m always willing to share your winnings should my suggestions make good.

On to the action in DC.  It is a very busy week on Capitol Hill with a number of key hearings.  Let’s start with Infrastructure as tomorrow a Sen Commerce/Transpo panel hears from state/local highway and municipal officials Wednesday while the full Committee hosts Transpo Secretary Chao and Commerce Secretary Ross on Wednesday.  Also Wednesday, a House Ways & Means panel revisits impacts of the post-tax reform tax extenders and a House Energy panel will discuss legislation addressing cybersecurity and emergency response.  Finally, on Thursday, House Oversight’s energy panel will examine federal permitting processes.  Also several budget hearings this week with Interior Zinke at Senate Energy tomorrow and House Resources on Thursday.  Energy Secretary Perry at House E&W Approps on Thursday and at Senate Transpo Wednesday Afternoon.

The ARPA-E Innovation Summit is at National Harbor starting tomorrow and features the Chamber Global Energy Institute head Karen Harbert hosting a Wednesday Fireside Chat with Perry.  Meanwhile, the National League of Cities is in DC this week for its annual Meeting (infrastructure and environment are definitely on the schedule), as is the National Lt Governors Assn with my colleague Liam Donovan is talking infrastructure on Thursday there.  The Business Council for Sustainable Energy has its annual DC Clean Energy Forum tomorrow featuring FERC’s Rich Glick, EPA’s Bill Wehrum and DOE’s Dan Simmons.   And ACORE holds its renewable energy forum on Capitol Hill Wednesday.

Obviously, the steel tariffs remain a major issue for consuming Industries impacted by the president’s decision. Once again this week, the trade experts at Bracewell are hot on the case. Check out our podcast here on Stitcher, iTunes, SoundCloud, and Google Play Music which breaks down the details and adds good background info.

As I said last week, the 10th Annual Congressional Hockey Challenge is set for the Kettler Capitals Iceplex on Thursday May 15th.  I will be on the ice again this year officiating and I hope you all try to attend for this great cause.  Get Tickets here. If this helps get you there, you should also know that I will be singing Oh Canada.

Remember, Wednesday is Pi Day (for Our Math nerd readers) and Thursday is the Ides of March (for our history buffs).  Call with questions.  Best,

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

(202) 997-5932

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“We are gravely concerned that significant cuts to, or the elimination of, key clean energy programs at DOE – and across the federal government – could undermine job creation and the goal to modernize the country’s aging energy infrastructure. Therefore, as Congress moves forward with appropriations legislation for the remainder of Fiscal Year 2018 and Fiscal Year 2019, we request that you consider the value these programs provide to the reliability and security of the nation’s energy system and to American consumers.”

Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE) head Lisa Jacobson in a letter to House Appropriators urging support for federal Clean Energy Programs.

ON THE POD

Bracewell Podcast Focuses on Trade – The latest Bracewell podcast is live on Stitcher, iTunes, SoundCloud, and Google Play Music.  My Colleague Liam Donovan takes the driver’s seat to interview Bracewell trade expert Josh Zive on the proclamations released by the Administration for steel and aluminum tariffs. We explore exactly what these proclamations say, what they mean for international relations and the American economy, and how they will impact domestic businesses.

STEEL, ALUMINUM TARIFFS Q&A

My colleagues Josh Zive (202-828-5838) and Paul Nathanson (202-828-1714) drafted this Steel/Aluminum tariffs Q&A that I wanted to forward.  Both have been working these issues for years and can be helpful should you have additional questions or need additional background.  President Trump issued formal proclamations announcing new tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum late last week.  The tariffs – 25% on steel and 10% on aluminum – represent a significant change in U.S. trade policy. They will likely result in higher prices for all steel, and are expected to trigger a series of WTO complaints and retaliatory actions by U.S. trading partners.  The proclamations mark the start of the next phase of the fight over tariffs. Companies who use steel, regardless of the steel’s origin, need to prepare to engage in the debate.

BACKGROUND – On April 27, 2017, President Trump directed the Department of Commerce to undertake an investigation under Section 232 of the Trade Expansion Act of 1962 in order to determine the national security implications of steel and aluminum imports.  In January, the Department of Commerce, submitted reports to President Trump detailing its findings that steel and aluminum imports threaten our national security. The steel report can be found here and the aluminum report here. Commerce recommended a global steel tariff of at least 24% and a global aluminum tariff of 7.7%. President Trump was given 90 days after receiving the reports to decide on “any potential action.”

On March 1, 2018, the President stated that the U.S. will impose a 25% tariff on steel and a 10% tariff on aluminum. This statement, which came during a press conference, was not accompanied by any documentation or guidance. The formal proclamation of the tariffs issued yesterday, March 8, 2018, is very important as it provides the first meaningful guidance of the details of the tariffs.

TARIFF PROCLAMATIONS Q&A – The two proclamations signed by President Trump include some important details for companies that are concerned about the impact of the tariffs on their business operations.

Q: What tariff rates did the President announce?

A: 25% on all imported steel and 10% on all imported aluminum.

Q: When do the tariffs take effect?

A: The tariffs will apply to all goods entered into the U.S. on or after 12:01 am eastern time on March 23, 2018.

Q: Does this rate apply to imported steel from all countries?

A: Yes, other than Canada and Mexico.

Q: Canada and Mexico are exempted from the tariff? Why and for how long?

A: Both countries are exempted because they present “a special case” and “the necessary and appropriate means to address the threat to the national security posed by imports of steel articles from Canada and Mexico is to continue ongoing discussions with these countries.”  The exemption is indefinite.

Q: Can other countries request exemptions?

A: Yes, the proclamations provide that other countries are invited to negotiate with the U.S. to craft alternative solutions, and if such a solution is agreed to, the President can lift the tariffs. However, the proclamations establish no process for such negotiations, and it is not clear how such negotiations will proceed.

Q: To what specific products do the new tariffs apply?

A: Steel: Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) codes 7206.10-7216.50, 7216.99-7301.10, 7302.10, 7302.40-7302.90, and 7304.10-7306.90. (Steel Chapter of HTS) Aluminum: (a) unwrought aluminum (HTS 7601); (b) aluminum bars, rods, and profiles (HTS 7604); (c) aluminum wire (HTS 7605); (d) aluminum plate, sheet, strip, and foil (flat rolled products) (HTS 7606 and 7607); (e) aluminum tubes and pipes and tube and pipe fitting (HTS 7608 and 7609); and (f) aluminum castings and forgings (HTS 7616.99.51.60 and 7616.99.51.70). (Aluminum Chapter of HTS).

Q: Can other products be excluded from the tariffs in the future?

A: Yes. The proclamations require the Secretary of Commerce to issue procedures for requests for product exclusions within the next 10 days. In order to be excluded, the proclamations state that the Secretaries of State, Treasury, and Defense must determine, in coordination with White House officials, that a product is not produced in the U.S. in a sufficient and reasonably available amount or of a satisfactory quality. After making such a determination, which will typically include an opportunity for other stakeholders to comment, the exclusion is published in the Federal Register and takes effect.

This is a complex process that will require that applicants for exclusions engage in a mix of legal, policy, and public advocacy in order to successfully make their case.

Q: Are the tariffs subject to review by U.S. courts or the World Trade Organization (WTO)?

A: Yes. U.S. courts will surely hear challenges to the tariffs after they have been levied against imported steel and aluminum products. However, these challenges are likely to take years to make their way through the court system, and the President is normally given wide latitude to shape national security and foreign policy. The WTO is a different matter, however. While the WTO does not have the power to overturn and nullify the tariffs, if the WTO finds that the tariffs are not consistent with U.S. obligations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), and the President refuses to revise the tariffs, the WTO could allow complaining countries to levy costly retaliatory tariffs on U.S. goods. This was the outcome when the Bush Administration imposed tariffs on steel in 2002. The WTO complaint process can take years to become final, although the economic and diplomatic uncertainty surrounding the process often leads to early settlements between countries.

Q: This is bad for my company, what can I do?

A: Yes, and there is little time to waste. Concerned companies need to begin developing and executing an advocacy campaign that educates the public about the harms of these tariffs (specifically as related to employment or ongoing business operations) and making outreach to key Legislative and Executive branch officials who have a stake in the health of the companies.

Specifically, the exclusion process will provide opportunities for companies to have specific steel and aluminum products excluded from the tariffs. However, in order to effectively pursue such exclusions, companies need to begin building their cases now. This means:

    • Collecting data on the steel aluminum products the companies utilize, and the countries of origin of the products;
    • Analyzing the domestic availability and prices for replacement materials;
    • Developing arguments about the economic or national security harms that would occur if products were not available or affordable; and
    • Identifying the threat that the tariffs pose to a company’s ability to compete or survive.

IN THE NEWS

Powell Details Need for CleanTech “Moonshot” – China is way ahead in the race to commercialize and export clean energy technologies.  In his latest video, ClearPath Executive Director Rich Powell explains why “moonshot” clean energy technology goals would allow the U.S. to catch up with China by focusing Department of Energy priorities and resources on the biggest breakthroughs in advanced nuclear, carbon capture, grid-scale storage, solar and other advanced technologies. Watch Rich – in less than four minutes – sum up his recent appearance before the House Energy and Commerce Committee with the help of ClearPath graphics wizard Mitch Kersey. The optimistic takeaway message: While the U.S. may not be able to compete with China in cranes and concrete, setting moonshot energy technology goals can help ensure U.S. leadership in innovation and deployment.

CRA Report Details RFS Change – The Fueling American Jobs Coalition released a Charles River Associates (CRA) study that concludes that a price containment mechanism, like a cap or a credit waiver, would not undermine the integrity of the RINs trading system nor would it depress blending rates of ethanol.  Instead, it would improve the performance of the RFS and better achieve its goals.  Unlike other recent reports, the CRA study is firmly grounded in recent historical evidence that shows no correlation between high RINs prices and any stimulus for increased blending.  Further, cost containment mechanisms are successfully used in Renewable Portfolio Standards, various carbon policies, and in California’s Low Carbon Fuel Standard – without damage to trading integrity or reductions in desired outcome.  Only CRA evaluates RINs cost containment in comparison to other similar case studies in the same and other energy sectors.

BCSE Urges Support for Clean Energy Programs – The Business Council for Sustainable Energy released a letter to House Appropriators to support critical clean energy programs in the Department of Energy (DOE) Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Fossil Energy (FE), Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (EDER), Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) and other essential DOE programs. These programs continue to provide value to American consumers and business. Continued investment in energy research development and deployment is needed to increase the efficiency of our energy generation and use, and to spur new innovations.

Senate Energy Approves Nuclear Legislation – The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee approved a bill that would push the US to advance nuclear power. The committee forwarded to the full Senate the Advanced Nuclear Energy Technologies Act (S. 1457) from Sens. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), which sets a goal by 2028 for demonstrating at least four new advanced reactor designs. The committee also approved House Science and Technology Chairman Lamar Smith’s bipartisan Department of Energy Research and Innovation Act (H.R. 589), a bill House lawmakers passed early last year that provides longer term certainty for the Office of Science’s energy innovation hubs and modernizes the national laboratory system and promotes the transfer of federal research to the private sector in order to bring innovative ideas to the commercial marketplace.

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

AFPM Annual Meeting Set for New Orleans – The American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers will hold its 2018 annual meeting in New Orleans today and tomorrow at the Hilton Riverside.  The meeting is the world’s premier refining meeting, assembling key executives, decision-makers, and technical experts from refining businesses, technology providers, contracting and consulting firms, and equipment manufacturers around the world. It will address current issues of importance to the industry, including industry and community impacts of the 2017 hurricane season. The breakout sessions will feature presentations and panels on process safety, key regulatory issues, innovation, workforce development, economic/commercial issues, the use of big data and emerging technologies.  Speakers include former Tonight Show host Jay Leno, NFL CMO Dawn Hudson, political analyst Charlie Cook Koch CEO Brad Razook and GM’s Dan Nicholson.

Cities to Hear from Scott, Booker – The National League of Cities holds its annual Congressional City Conference at the Marriott Wardman Park today through Wednesday.   Numerous panels will discuss subjects from opioids to environment to infrastructure. On Wednesday Morning in CVC 217 on Capitol Hill, Pew Charitable Trusts will join NLC for a breakfast briefing to call attention to the need for Congress and the Administration to focus on flood-ready infrastructure. Local and federal elected officials will discuss how making communities more resilient to extreme weather will help protect people and property, reduce future risk, and save taxpayer dollars.  Elizabeth Esty and John Katko will be on the panel.

Forum to Look at Pipeline – The Atlantic Council’s Eurasia Center and Global Energy Center will hold a debate today at 2:00 p.m. looking at the Nord Stream 2 pipeline and its potential implications for the United States and its European allies. Panels I and II will debate the different views on the pipeline from the United States and Europe and address the impact of Nord Stream 2 on European energy security, the political and economic questions associated with the pipeline, and the effects of the pipeline on transit countries in Central and Eastern Europe.

JHU to Host Discussion on Renewables – The Johns Hopkins University SAIS program holds a discussion today at 5:00 p.m. on the politics of a global energy transition to renewables. A new book — presented by Professor Johannes Urpelainen — will offer a comprehensive political analysis of the rapid growth in renewable wind and solar power, mapping an energy transition through theory, case studies, and policy analysis.

Perry, Harbert Headline ARPA-E Summit – The ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit will be held tomorrow through Thursday at is an annual conference and technology showcase that brings together experts from different technical disciplines and professional communities to think about America’s energy challenges in new and innovative ways. Now in its ninth year, the Summit offers a unique, three-day program aimed at moving transformational energy technologies out of the lab and into the market. Chamber’s Global Energy Institute head Karen Harbert will conduct a Fireside Chat with Energy Secretary Perry on Wednesday.  Other main speakers include DOE’s Paul Dabbar, BPC’s Jason Grumet, SAFE’s autonomous vehicle expert Amitai Bin-Nun and Siemens Global Power CEO Tim Holt.

NRC to Host Reg Info Conference – The Nuclear Regulatory Commission holds its 30th annual Regulatory Information Conference on NRC HQ in North Bethesda, Md.

BSCE Holds Clean Energy Forum – The Business Council for Sustainable Energy holds its 2018 Clean Energy Forum tomorrow in the Capitol Visitor Center, Senate Rooms 208-209.  The event is closed to press but will include remarks from FERC’s Rich Glick, EPA’s Bill Wehrum and DOE’s Dan Simmons, among others.

Forum to Look at CCS – The Global CCS Institute holds its 7th Annual DC Forum on CCS tomorrow in the Ronald Reagan Building’s Polaris Room at 8:30 a.m.  The event is a lively discussion of the key questions that clean energy and CCS advocates are focused on, including 45Q impact, private sector investment, future government support and key audiences for advocacy efforts. Speakers include ClearPath’s Rich Powell, Global CCS Institute CEO Brad Page, WRI’s Andrew Steer, former Assistant Secretary of Energy for Fossil Energy David Mohler, ADM’s Scott McDonald, Kurt Walzer of the Clean Air Task Force, House Energy Committee former Chief Counsel Tom Hassenboehler and former DOE official Daniel Richter.

Senate Energy Takes Up Interior Budget – The Senate Energy Committee holds a hearing tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. on the president’s proposed fiscal 2019 budget for the Interior Department.

Forum to Look at Venezuela Oil – Next Tuesday at 9:00 a.m., the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center and Global Energy Center for a timely conversation on the downfall of Venezuela’s oil sector and what may be in store in the future.  Speakers will include former State Dept official David Goldwyn, Atlantic Council Author Francisco Monaldi and Jason Marczak, Director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

BPC Infrastructure Hub Sets Innovation Forum – The BPC Infrastructure Lab hold its second event in a series on Infrastructure Ideas and Innovations tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. The American economy is increasingly driven by a powerful network of billions of “smart” and connected devices, ranging from miniscule sensors to massive industrial machines. From autonomous vehicles to smart water meters, today’s innovations are transforming how we live and how our core industries do business.  These technological advancements also raise important policy questions: What infrastructure investments must be made to ensure that the Industrial Internet of Things (IIOT), the infrastructure that underlies the innovation, has the powerful and reliable communications network needed to sustain it? How can we incorporate IIoT innovations, such as custom private networks that combine satellite-terrestrial technologies, to improve the quality and competitiveness of our infrastructure?

Zinke to Discuss Budget – The Senate Energy and Natural Resources holds a hearing tomorrow on the administration’s FY 2019 budget request for Interior.  The hearing will feature Secretary Zinke.

Forum to Look at Self-Driving Cars – New America’s Future Tense, transportation planners from Phoenix and Pittsburgh, representatives from Waymo, Lyft, Intel, and Toyota, and leading academic researchers will hold a discussion tomorrow at 11:30 a.m. to Look at the technological revolution of self-driving cars beginning to unfold on city streets.

WRI Stories to Watch Released – Tomorrow at 12:15 at JHU, experts from World Resources Institute look at trends, political dynamics, data and innovations that will shape environment, economy and international development for the coming year. Michael Oko will share insights into the big stories and global trends shaping the world. In this turbulent political time, he will explore issues related to climate change, energy markets, water, security issues, technology, and more.

Senate Panel to Look at Infrastructure – The Senate Commerce Committee’s Surface Transportation and Merchant Marine Infrastructure, Safety and Security Subcommittee hearing is holding a hearing tomorrow at 2:30 p.m. in 253 Russell on infrastructure.  Witnesses include Kyle Schneweis of the Nebraska Department of Transportation, Dan Gilmartin of the Michigan Municipal League, Jordan Kass of C.H. Robinson and Jo Strang of the American Short Line and Regional Railroad Association.

RFF to Host NatGas Event – Resources for The Future holds a forum tomorrow at 12:45 p.m. to discuss a new study by RFF Senior Fellows Joshua Linn and Richard Morgenstern  that finds the dramatic decline in US shale gas prices increased employment in manufacturing and energy-intensive industries much less than previously thought.   RFF hosts a discussion of the study’s results, featuring comments from industry, environmental, and academic perspectives.

Algae, CCS Forum Set – Tomorrow at 1:30 p.m., U.S. Energy Association hosts a presentation on algae’s role in successful CO2 mitigation campaign.   Heralded by proponents, dismissed by naysayers, algae may not cure our carbon conundrum but could be a key enabler for carbon capture and use (CCU). Algae Biomass Organization Executive Director Matt Carr addresses the topic.

Solar Operations Conference Set – The Solar Asset Management North America forum will be held in San Francisco tomorrow and Wednesday. The event is the leading conference focused on the operational phase of solar plants and portfolios. The recommendations on the Section 201 solar trade case as well as the new tax provisions will also affect the existing assets, budgets and O&M. The conference aims to fully assess and quantify the impact on the future of the solar industry.

NOAA Comms Director Heads EnvirorunEnvirorun hosts David Herring, director of communications and education at NOAA’s Climate Program Office tomorrow at 6:00 p.m.  Starting this month, the Speaker Series will be taking place at WeWork K Street and will feature a new route and the run starting at 6 p.m. and speaker at 7 p.m.  Envirorun will meet at WeWork K Street before going out on the fun run. There will be a place to store bags while runners are on the trails. After the run, we will return to the venue for networking and hear from the speaker at 7:00 pm. Non-runners welcome to join.

LGs Meet in DC – The National Lt. Governors Assn will hold its 2018 Federal-State Relations Meeting in Washington DC at the Palomar Hotel.  Among the speakers will be Second Lady Karen Pence, USDA’s Steve Censky, White House Infrastructure official DJ Gribbin and my Bracewell tax expert colleague Liam Donovan are among the speakers.

ACORE Renewable Policy Forum Set for Cap Hill – The annual 2018 ACORE Renewable Energy Policy Forum will be held on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.  The ACORE National Renewable Energy Policy Forum is the only pan-technology renewable energy policy summit to address federal and state policy. This signature conference brings together industry leaders and policymakers to discuss energy and tax policy, debate pressing issues in the changing electricity marketplace, and identify priorities for Congress, the states, and relevant agencies.

Senate to hear Cabinet Officials on Infrastructure – The Senate Commerce Committee will hold a full committee hearing on infrastructure Wednesday featuring Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Energy Secretary Rick Perry, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta and Agriculture Secretary Sonny Purdue.

House Energy to Look at Cyber, Emergency Response – The House Energy and Commerce Energy Subcommittee holds a hearing on Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. to explore DOE modernization legislation addressing cybersecurity and emergency response. Witnesses include DOE’s Mark Menezes and Patricia Hoffman, as well as EEI’s Scott Aaronson, Dominion’s Mark Engel, Tristan Vance of Indiana’s Office of Energy Development, Zachary Tudor of the Idaho National Lab and NEMA’s Kyle Pitsor.

House Tax Panel to Review Extenders – The House Ways and Means Tax Policy Subcommittee holds a hearing on Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. looking at the post-Tax Reform evaluation of recently expired tax provisions.  BCSE’s Lisa Jacobson will be among those testifying.

House Science to Look at National Labs – The House Science Committee holds a hearing on Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. looking at national laboratories innovations in science.

Zinke to Headline Forum – Faegre Baker Daniels will host its 5th annual Energy and Environmental Symposium at the National Press Club on Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. This year’s event will examine the relationship between the energy industry and infrastructure, including potential environmental issues.  Speakers will include Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, Rep. Bill Shuster and CEQ’s Alex Herrgott.

CSIS to Talk Electricity Markets, Conflicts – On Wednesday at 3:30 p.m., the CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host Dr. Brian Ó Gallachóir (University College Cork) and Dr. Morgan Brazilian (Colorado School of Mines) for a presentation on electricity market and infrastructure developments in conflict zones with particular focus on power sector development in the wake of The Troubles in Northern Ireland. Sarah Ladislaw (CSIS) will moderate the discussion.

FERC Monthly Meeting Target Tax Reform Legislation – On Thursday, FERC hold Its monthly meeting to consider the effect of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act on rates subject to its oversight. The agency will also review its policy for the recovery of income tax costs.

Shimkus to Headline Oil Forum – The Atlantic Council holds a discussion on Thursday at 8:00 a.m. on strategic oil product stockholding.  Speakers will include Rep. John Shimkus, AFPM’s Susan Grissom and former Energy Dept official Melanie Kenderdine.

House Approps Panel to Review DOE Budget – The House Appropriations Energy-Water Subcommittee holds a hearing on Thursday at 10:00 a.m. reviewing the fiscal 2019 Energy Department budget.  Sect Perry will testify.

Tillerson Heads to Senate FR – The Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on the State Department budget is Thursday in 419 Dirksen.  Secretary of State Rex Tillerson testifies.

House Resources Committee to Host Zinke – The House Natural Resources Committee holds a hearing on Thursday at 10:00 a.m. to review the fiscal 2019 Interior Department budget.  Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will testify.

House Oversight Energy Panel Looks at Permit Process – The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee’s Subcommittee on the Interior, Energy, and Environment will convene a hearing Thursday at 2:00 p.m. to examine Federal permitting processes.

GW to Look at Public Trust Doctrine – The George Washington University Law School symposium Thursday and Friday on the role of Public Trust Doctrine including climate, water resources and state constitutions.  Our Bracewell colleague (also of the U of Houston Law School is among the presenters.

Forum on New Solar Book – On Friday at 10:00 a.m., the CSIS Energy and National Security Program hosts a discussion on ‘Taming the Sun,’ the new book by Dr. Varun Sivaram, Philip D. Reed fellow for Science and Technology at the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Sivaram will discuss the financial, technological and systematic innovation required to maximize solar power utilization and highlight the need for a creative public policy framework, and comprehensive energy market restructuring, to create a more effective clean energy portfolio and establish solar energy as the cornerstone of the global energy revolution.

Forum Looks at Budget Impacts on Climate, Enviro Research – The Novim Group, in partnership with the Environmental and Energy Study Institute, holds a briefing on Friday at 2:00 p.m. discussing a new report on the environmental and societal impacts of the Administration’s proposed climate and environmental research program cuts for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018. The briefing’s speakers, who helped author the Novim report, will give an overview of its findings and conclusions. Speakers for this forum are Michael Ditmore and Ari Patrinos of Novim as well as Kei Koizumi American Association for the Advancement of Science.

IN THE FUTURE

World Water Forum Set – The 8th World Water Forum will be in Brasilia, Brazil on March 18 to 23.

HVAC Industry to Hold Session at Canadian Forum – AHRI will host two educational sessions at the Canadian Mechanical & Plumbing Exposition (CMPX), taking place March 21-23 in Toronto at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.  On Wednesday, March 21st at 2:00 p.m., Associate Certification Engineer David Noyes will host a one-hour session on heating product certification programs. Certification Engineer Caroline M. Henley will follow for a session on AHRI’s variable refrigerant flow standard and certification program.

Ethanol Group to Hold Fly-In – The American Coalition for Ethanol holds its 10th annual DC Fly-IN & Government Affairs Summit. The meetings will take place at the Liaison Capitol Hill Hotel and on Capitol Hill.  Speakers will include EPA’s Bill Wehrum and Sen. Joni Ernst.

Forum to Look at China Energy Ambitions – On Thursday, March 22nd at 9:00 a.m., the Woodrow Wilson Center’s China Environment Forum will be hosting speakers to discuss the trend lines of China’s coal and nuclear power domestically and along the Belt and Road. Thomas Rawski (University of Pittsburgh) will provide a snapshot of current efforts to reform domestic energy structures and electricity pricing, and how these changes may affect domestic and overseas investment in coal and nuclear power. Ravi Madhavan (University of Pittsburgh) will discuss the state-owned enterprise landscape that dominates nuclear power development in China and how they are making inroads into overseas markets, including Pakistan, Argentina, and the UK. Erica Downs, a senior research scientist in the China Studies division of the CNA Corporation will take us further along the Belt and Road, looking at some of the broader drivers of China’s financing and building of power plants abroad.

WCEE Forum to Look at AVs – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) will hold a brown bag lunch on Thursday March 22nd at Noon to hear from Ellen Partridge, Senior Law Fellow at the Environmental Law and Policy Center; Kelley Coyner, Senior Fellow at the Center for Regional Analysis and Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University; and Fred Wagner, partner at Venable, as they share with us their knowledge of AV’s and the impacts AV’s will have on the natural and human environment, energy consumption, and the transportation landscape generally.

International PetroChem Conference Ready – AFPM holds its 2018 International Petrochemical Conference in San Antonio on March 25-27th.  The International Petrochemical Conference is the world’s largest and most prestigious conference representing the petrochemical industry. The meeting consists of a variety of sessions covering key political, economic, and environmental issues affecting the petrochemical industry. The sessions emphasize global competitiveness in the petrochemical business and are presented by recognized experts in the areas of petrochemical markets, economics, and politics.

EPA Clean Power Plan Repeal Hearing Heads for WY – EPA’s final listening sessions for its proposed repeal of the Clean Power Plan start in Gillette, Wyoming on March 27th.  The EPA had already held one two-day meeting in West Virginia in late 2017.

Offshore Wind Partnership Forum Set – The Business Network for Offshore Wind hold its 2018 International Offshore Wind Partnering Forum on April 3rd to 6th in Princeton New Jersey.  The IPF is the leading technical conference for offshore wind in the United States and is dedicated to moving the industry forward.  Among the speakers will be BOEM’s Walter Cruickshank and James Bennett, Statoil’s Sebastian Bringsværd, U of Delaware’s Jeremy Firestone, NYSERDA’s Greg Lampman, Recharge’s Darius Snieckus Deepwater’s Jeff Grybowski and NWF’s Collin O’Mara.

Refiners Security Conference Set – The annual AFPM Security Conference will be held on April 23-25 in New Orleans and presents current topics of vital importance to critical infrastructure, keeping security professionals up to date on security issues, policies, and future regulations. The event will relay the latest information on security regulations from DHS and the Coast Guard. This year’s conference will also go beyond just the regulations with sessions on hurricane response efforts, environmental NGO activism, cybersecurity and other emerging security and terror threats.

WINDPOWER Set for Chicago – The American Wind Energy Assn (AWEA) will hold WINDPOWER 2018 in Chicago from May 7th to 10th.  The industry closed 2017 strong, delivering 7,017 megawatts (MW) of new wind power capacity. That new capacity represents $11 billion in new private investment. There are now 89,077 MW of wind power installed across 41 states, enough to power 26 million American homes.  The wind industry is expected to continue its growth into 2018. WINDPOWER is where the industry comes together to plan for the future and keep this success story growing.

Clean Energy Forum on Schedule – The 2018 Congressional Clean Energy Expo and Policy Forum will be held on July 10th and brings together up to 45-55 businesses, trade associations, and government agencies to showcase renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

Energy Update: Week of 2/20

Friends,

Hope you enjoyed an extra day in honor of our Presidents.  It offered us a chance to watch a little more of the Winter Olympics. While there has been lots of great action, tomorrow’s Women’s Ice Hockey Gold Medal game may be the most significant event of the entire two-plus weeks.  While men’s ice hockey has taken a ratings hit because the NHL players didn’t play (thanks Gary Bettman), the game between the US-Canada should be spectacular.  In a pre-medal round game, the teams played to a hard-fought, very physical 2-1 Canada victory.  The final will likely pick up where that game left off.  And this is not new: remember in Sochi in 2014, Canada scrapped back from a two–goal deficit to win the Gold in OT.  Stay up late and watch…I suspect it will be worth it.

Congress is out this week, but there are still a few important things going on…  The National League of Cities hosts an infrastructure briefing this afternoon, while an advanced nuclear summit starts in College Station, TX today and runs through Thursday.  As well, EPA holds the first of its additional Clean Power plan repeal hearing tomorrow in KC while the Interior Department’s public hearings continue Thursday in DC.  Finally on Thursday, the Washington auto press hosts Consumer Reports to roll out their Top Picks for 2018.  The Conservative PAC also holds its annual meeting this week at the Gaylord just outside DC and in addition to the usual suspects, heads of EPA Scott Pruitt, DOE’s Rick Perry and Interior Ryan Zinke will speak as well.

Some interesting stories over the weekend.  Our friend Steve Mufson of the WaPo had a great piece on the bankruptcy of the Charleston Gazette and its often contentious relationship with the state’s coal industry.  Our good friend and long-time CG reporter Ken Ward featured prominently.  Also on Sunday, USS Cole Commander Kirk Lippold authored a piece in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on the national security implications of a strong refining sector and how it is undercut by the complications surrounding excessive RIN costs pushing Philadelphia Energy Solutions into bankruptcy.

With Dave Banks departing, the Mexichem court case, previous State Dept comments and new legislation on HFC, there’s a lot of action surrounding HFC reductions and the Kigali amendment to the Montreal Protocol.  We can help with these stories so let me know if you are interested.

Finally, the American Council on Capital Formation (ACCF) has released a new paper just now that includes research from MIT and others on how to shape to shape infrastructure projects. And speaking of infrastructure, make your calendar for NEXT Thursday, March 1st when Bracewell hosts an infrastructure symposium featuring Sen. Ted Cruz, CEQ’s Alex Hergott and a number of other experts.

BTW, Spring training is under way…  Call with questions.  Best,

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

1 (202) 997-5932

 

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“Enhancing U.S. technological leadership and supporting U.S. industry and the jobs it creates and sustains are key components of our support for the Kigali Amendment, and this bill will create a certain pathway for implementation of Kigali if, as we hope, it is submitted to and ratified by the Senate.”

Stephen Yurek, president of the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute commenting on the new legislation introduced by Sen. Kennedy.

“America deserves world-class infrastructure, and to get there we need to change our thinking to include not just how best to fund it, but also how best to spend it. This report highlights the importance of life cycle cost analysis and competition in paving – something that over the years has faded from infrastructure policy discussions. If federal and state decision makers took this report as a playbook, America would see tremendous taxpayer cost savings and stronger infrastructure built to last long into the future.”

Portland Cement Association President and CEO Michael Ireland on the new ACCF Infrastructure report.

 

IN THE NEWS

ACCF Releases Paper on Shaping Infrastructure – The American Council on Capital Formation (ACCF) has released a new paper that includes research from MIT and others on how to shape to shape infrastructure projects. ACCF’s Pınar Cebi Wilber researched how new infrastructure projects could be more efficient and effective.  This special report first looks at the reasons for infrastructure investment and then sets the stage for steps that are crucial for successful infrastructure projects. Particular attention is paid to ways to use existing funds more effectively and to increase participation by the private sector. The paper concludes with alternative methods for financing and funding the country’s much needed infrastructure. One of the key recommendations Is increase use of the life cycle project analysis/assessment, taking a long-run view while evaluating infrastructure projects could save significant sums of money both at the federal and local levels during the life of a project. See the Report

Senators Introduce New Legislation to Implement HFC Amendment – U.S. Senators John Kennedy (R-LA), Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Tom Carper (D-DE), Chris Coons (D-DE), Susan Collins (R-ME) and Jeff Merkley (D-OR) introduced the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act, bipartisan legislation that would support the worldwide transition towards next generation coolants pioneered by what were described as “innovative companies in Louisiana and other states.” At issue are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which are used as coolants in refrigerators and air conditioners. The HFC industry employs nearly 600,000 workers in the U.S. and generates annual sales of $206 billion. Because of changing global policy, countries are moving away from using HFCs. This legislation will allow the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to ensure a smooth phasedown of HFCs in the U.S., boosting the manufacturers producing next generation technologies. The bill would:

  • Clarify the authority of EPA in regulating HFC refrigerants and provide a market-friendly approach to rulemaking that will help facilitate a cost-effective transition to alternative refrigerants while maintaining or enhancing the performance of the equipment that uses the new refrigerants.
  • Enable the EPA to establish an HFC phase down mechanism using a cap-and-allocation system that encourages innovation and the commercialization of alternative refrigerants, preserving American technology leadership.
  • Provide the predictability needed for American private sector investment in HFC replacements.

AHRI Voices Support for Kennedy HFC Legislation – The Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute strongly supports the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act of 2018. As the trade association representing both producers and users of refrigerants, AHRI has a keen interest in ensuring that the coming global phase down of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants is accomplished in a smooth, orderly manner with as little impact on manufacturers and consumers as possible. AHRI said will help accomplish that goal by establishing a pathway for U.S. implementation of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol that establishes a framework for the global phase down.

Factbook Highlights State of Energy Economy – Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) and the Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE) released a comprehensive review of energy statistics in the 2018 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook. The report says rapid deployment of energy efficiency, natural gas and renewable energy in 2017 generated economic benefits without requiring increases in energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions. Looking over the year, the growth of sustainable energy industries contributed to greater economic competitiveness, job creation, and the expansion of the American economy. The 2018 Factbook is the sixth edition of an annual resource that outlines key energy trends contributing to American economic competitiveness.

Energy Sector is Transforming – The transformation of the energy sector escalated in 2017, as evidenced by continuing trends:

  • Natural gas remained the primary source of power generation in the U.S., and wind and solar build, combined with increased hydropower generation, drove renewable generation up from 15% to 18% of the total electricity mix in one year.
  • Energy productivity, which is the amount of GDP produced by a unit of energy, climbed 2.5% in 2017.
  • Costs remained low: consumers devoted only 1.3% of their spending towards electricity, smaller than at any time ever recorded. This offset a rise in the share of spending devoted to gasoline and motor fuels (up to 2.1% in 2017 from 1.9% in 2016), allowing the total percent of household expenses dedicated to energy costs to hover under 4%, near an all-time low.
  • Emissions from the electricity sector plummeted again, falling 4.2% year-on-year to the lowest level in more than 27 years.

Competitive Energy Sector – The U.S. remains globally competitive for energy-intensive industries, thanks to low industrial power prices, and U.S. players continue to invest in clean energy:

  • Historically, industrial power prices in the U.S. have been among the most affordable in the world (averaging 6.76¢/kWh in 2016). The U.S. had the second lowest prices of the G-7 countries in 2016; Canada was number one.
  • Corporations are playing a stronger role in the energy transformation, increasingly demanding cleaner energy and seeking to capture gains from energy efficiency. In 2017, corporations signed new deals for 2.9 GW worth of offsite renewable capacity.
  • Global clean energy investment rose to $333 billion, the second-highest amount on record. U.S. investments tracked 2016 levels, at $57 billion, but saw a shift in capital deployment towards wind and energy smart technologies.

New Energy Sector Developments – there were several new developments in the energy sector in 2017 that continue to change our energy dynamics.

  • The U.S. is solidifying its role as a global liquefied natural gas exporter, and for the first time was a net exporter of natural gas for every month of the year.
  • New sales of battery, plug-in hybrid, and hybrid vehicles accelerated, driven by longer-range versions of existing models, long-range affordable BEVs, and the electrification of new car segments. Significantly, the price of lithium-ion battery packs, a key cost component for battery electric vehicles, plummeted 23% year-on-year and have fallen 65% in five years (between 2013 and year end 2017).
  • Greater climate commitments from sub-national and private sector actors emerged in response to federal government climate policy back-tracking. Federal-level actions ranging from trade cases to tax reform also caused uncertainty in the market for clean technologies.

The U.S. energy transformation is impacting the economy – These include successes on grid resilience, job creation and economic opportunites.

  • The renewable energy, energy efficiency and natural gas sectors employed approximately three million Americans in 2016. Energy efficiency, with nearly 2.2 million jobs, was the largest single employer within the sustainable energy sectors.
  • American economic growth is picking up steam, without a parallel jump in energy consumption. Since 2008, primary energy usage has shrunk 1.7% even as GDP has accelerated by 15.3%.
  • Utilities and independent developers continue to invest in infrastructure to improve grid operations and support the growth of clean energy. Investor-owned utilities and independent developers spent an estimated $22.9 billion on electric transmission in 2017, a 10% rise year-on-year and a 91% increase since 2011. Investment in midstream natural gas infrastructure (e.g., transmission, distribution and storage) climbed 19% from 2015 to 2016, with distribution accounting for nearly half of the escalation in spending. Total investment in distribution hit its highest level yet at $13.4bn, a 16% expansion from 2015 levels.

Where Can You Read It – The 2018 Factbook includes a comprehensive overview and detailed charts, graphs and sources for a wide range of information that defines the U.S. sustainable energy landscape.

The 2018 Factbook is offered in PDF format available electronically (download from the BCSE website here: http://www.bcse.org/sustainableenergyfactbook) and in a hard copy format directly from the BCSE. The Factbook is intended to serve as a reference guide of sustainable energy statistics throughout the year for media, policymakers, business and industry.

ClearPath to Support Costello in PA – ClearPath Action Fund is kicking off its 2018 cycle by endorsing Rep. Ryan Costello (R-Pa.) and pledging $1 million to help re-elect him in a swing Southeastern Pennsylvania district. The effort will begin with a six-figure, targeted TV and digital ad buy this spring to highlight Costello’s record advocating policies that expand clean and reliable energy.  “Ryan Costello is one of the most committed clean energy champions in Congress and we’re proud to make him our first 2018 endorsement,” ClearPath Action Fund Founder Jay Faison said.  A Public Opinion Strategies survey conducted last summer of GOP and swing voters in several districts and states key to the 2018 congressional election showed Republicans considerably gaining after focused messaging on clean energy. That included a 23-point boost in Costello’s 6th congressional district for a generic Republican candidate who espouses pro-clean energy messaging.

Cramer to Run for ND Senate Seat – North Dakota Rep. Kevin Cramer said he will challenge Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp at an announcement rally for Friday afternoon.  Heitkamp is one of the most vulnerable Democrats facing reelection in 2018 in a state President Trump won by more than 30 percentage points in 2016.

FERC Approves Storage Rule – Late Last week, FERC unanimously approved a final rule that would remove long-standing regulatory barriers in bringing batteries and other energy storage to the electric grid. FERC is ordering regional transmission and other grid operators to revise pricing to recognize the benefits of energy storage and allow the technology to compete with generators on the wholesale market. Energy storage is key to improving the reliability of intermittent renewable power sources and even helping constant-running nuclear become better utilized during peak times on the grid.

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Advanced Nuke Conference Headlined by Current, Former NRC, Energy Officials – The Advanced Reactors Summit V and Showcase will run today through Thursday at Texas A&M in College Station, sponsored by the US Nuclear infrastructure Council.  Energy Under Secretary Mark Menezes, NRC Commissioner Stephen Burns, former NRC Commissioner and now OECD’s Director-General of the Nuclear Energy Agency Bill Magwood, top nuclear company representatives, former NRC Commissioner Jeff Merrifield, EIRP’s Irfan Ali and ClearPath Policy Director Jeremy Harrell are among those speaking.

DOE to Hold Electricity Committee Meeting – The Energy Department’s Electricity Advisory Committee will meet today at 1:00 p.m. at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association in Arlington.

Forum to Discuss Fukushima Research – The Embassy of Japan’s Information and Culture Center holds a discussion today at 6:30 p.m. on Fukushima.  For seven years, a research group from Fukushima University has been examining not only the damage from the disaster, but various aspects of its effects on the region, including food safety, community rebuilding, disaster prevention policies, and more. JICC will hold a video presentation and panel discussion with four professors from the Fukushima Research Group, who will discuss their research and views on the current situation of recovery in the damaged areas as well as reports from those who are on the “front lines” of community recovery. The panel discussion will be followed by a Q&A.

EPA Clean Power Plan Repeal Hearing Hits KC – EPA’s additional listening sessions for its proposed repeal of the Clean Power Plan start on Wednesday in Kansas City, Mo.    The two remaining sessions will be in San Francisco next Wednesday and Gillette, Wyoming on March 27.  The EPA had already held one two-day meeting in West Virginia in late 2017.

CSIS to Hosts Forum on China, New Vehicles – The Center for Strategic & International Studies holds a forum tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. on China’s high-tech drive is its push to develop new-generation cars. To understand these trends and their implications, the Freeman Chair’s Scott Kennedy will first provide an overview of recent developments in Chinese policies and its auto sector. He will then moderate a panel discussion with leading experts from industry and academia on a range of issues about China and the industry more generally.  The speakers will include Zachary Kahn of BYD Heavy Energies, Wall Street Journal Detroit Bureau Chief John Stoll, Anand Shah of the Albright Stonebridge Group and JHU’s Jonas Nahm.

EPA Hosts CPP Repeal Hearing – EPA holds the first of its additional Clean Power plan repeal hearing tomorrow in Kansas City at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Beacon Complex. The listening session will begin at 10:00 a.m. with opening remarks followed by oral testimony from those wishing to speak.

Forum to Look at FERC Decision on Grid NOPR – Tomorrow at Noon, the Global America Business Institute will host a presentation on the FERC Response to grid resilience in RTOs and ISOs.  The speaker will be Judah Rose, Senior Vice President and Managing Director at ICF International.

EMA To Hold Roundtable – The Emissions Marketing Association will hold roundtable Thursday in Juno Beach, Florida at the offices of NextEra Energy.  The event will include presentations, Q&A, and networking opportunities to allow for dialogue among the attendees.

Offshore Drilling Meeting Set to Hit DC – The Interior Department’s public hearings continue this week in DC with a hearing on Thursday to discuss the interior Department’s expanded five-year drilling plan.  Already, Interior has held meetings today in Annapolis MD, Jackson MS, Richmond VA, Dover DE, Augusta ME, Baton Rouge LA, Anchorage AK, Concord NH, Boston MA, Montgomery AL, Providence RI, Tacoma WA, Austin TX, Salem OR, Tallahassee FL, Sacramento CA, Hartford CT, Columbia SC, Hamilton NJ and Albany NY.  After Washington, DC Thursday, only Raleigh, NC (Feb 26) and Atlanta, GA (Feb 28) remain.

Consumers to Reveal Annual Auto Issue – The Washington Automotive Press Association hosts Consumer Reports at the National Press Club on Thursday at Noon for lunch, and then at 12:45 p.m. for the official release of their Top Picks for 2018. Jake Fisher and Patrick Olsen of Consumer Reports will give an inside look at how Consumer Reports ranks and rates vehicles. Consumers and auto-industry insiders alike look to Consumer Reports’ Annual Auto Issue and website for CR’s Top Picks in cars and trucks. From best and worst in fuel economy, reliability and safety to tips on how to get the best deal, CR provides consumers unbiased ratings, recommendations, and advice that help consumers make informed decisions with their next car purchase.

Forum to Look at Coastal Communities – The Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) and the National Association of Regional Councils (NARC) hold a briefing on Thursday at 2:00 p.m. to discuss climate/weather risks to America’s coastal communities and the types of resilience plans local governments and regional partnerships are developing to safeguard their residents, built assets, and economies. The briefing will explore current and future infrastructure challenges facing public officials and how the federal government fits into the pursuit of these shared development goals.

Speakers for this forum are Miami-Dade County Chief Resilience Officer Jim Murley, Charleston, SC Chief Resilience Officer Mark Wilbert, Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Steve Walz.

Offshore Drilling Forum Set – The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) will host a public meeting on its Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Leasing Program on Thursday at the Hilton Garden Inn in DC.  It will use an open-house format, so participants can arrive any time during the scheduled meeting time. At the meetings, participants can ask questions, share information, talk with our team members one-on-one, and learn more about the National OCS Program.

WEN HAPPY HOUR – The Women’s Energy Network holds its winter Happy Hour reception on Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at Matchbox Bistro in Chinatown.

EPA to Discuss CT Petition – EPA will hold a public hearing on Friday at its D.C. headquarters regarding a 2016 petition filed by Connecticut asking the agency to order stronger pollution controls at a Pennsylvania power plant whose emissions Connecticut says harm its downwind air quality.

SEPA Head to Speak to Renewable Group – The Women of Renewable Industries and Sustainable Energy will hold a WRISE DC lunch and learn with Julia Hamm, President and Chief Executive Officer of Smart Electric Power Alliance (SEPA) on Friday at Noon.  .Hamm will discuss her recent trips to and work with Puerto Rico, what SEPA is doing more broadly, as well as take-aways from her decades of work in renewable energy.

Forum to Look at Reforming Jones Act – The Federalist Society’s Regulatory Transparency Project holds a discussion on Friday at Noon on whether it is time to reform the Jones Act.  SMU’s James Coleman and former member of the U.S. Federal Maritime Commission Rob Quartel will be among the speaker.

Finland Chamber to Discuss Company – The Finnish America Chamber of Commerce will hold a lunch with Neste representatives on Friday at Noon.  Neste was listed as the second most sustainable company in the world on the Global 100 List.  Neste’s jump was enabled particularly by the company’s continued good overall performance, especially in Clean Air Productivity, measuring the air emissions of the company.  Neste’s Johan Lunabba, Adrian Suharto and Dayne Delahoussaye will speak.

IN THE FUTURE

Climate, Security Forum Set – Next Monday February 26th at 9:30 a.m., the Center for Climate and Security, in partnership with the Environmental and Energy Study Institute, holds their 2018 Climate and National Security Forum: A Responsibility to Prepare. This year’s forum panels will focus on the risks that climate change presents to national security on an operational and strategic level, and the challenges and opportunities in preparing to counter and manage those risks.

BP Energy Outlook Set for Release – The CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host the U.S. launch of BP Energy Outlook 2018 on Monday February 26th at 9:30 a.m. Spencer Dale, chief economist of BP, will present the findings of the outlook followed by a moderated conversation with Sarah Ladislaw, director and senior fellow of the CSIS Energy & National Security Program.

BPC to Focus on Nuclear Energy Exports – The Bipartisan Policy Center hold a discussion next Monday at 10:00 a.m. with members of DOE, the U.S. nuclear energy industry, academia, and the Nuclear Innovation Alliance looking at the vital role that the export control regulations play in nuclear energy commerce and nonproliferation efforts. The conversation will focus on recommendations from a recent Nuclear Innovation Alliance report on how the regulations and their implementation can be improved.  Speakers will include NNSA’s Kate Strangis and Matt Bunn of the Harvard Kennedy School.

CSIS to Look at Short-Term Oil Outlook – The CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a conference Tuesday February 27th on the short-term outlook for U.S. tight oil production and its implications for global oil markets.  As we enter the new year with renewed commitment from the OPEC/non-OPEC partnership, Brent has continued to climb from $45 per barrel low in 2017 to $70 in January 2018. Global economic growth continues to look robust, oil stocks are clearly in decline, geopolitical challenges remain ever-present, and market sentiment looks bullish (for now). However, persistently higher prices have the potential to bring on additional supply from both OPEC and non-OPEC sources.  In this context, much attention is being directed to prospective U.S. supply growth. Based on assessments of resource strength, well productivity, hedging activity, cash flow, break even costs, and a sizeable backlog in drilled-but-uncompleted wells (DUCs), estimates of U.S. near-term output vary widely and challenges remain. Against this backdrop, the CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a distinguished group of experts to discuss the outlook moving forward.  Our friend Paul Sankey will speak at the event.

ERCOT Market Forum Set – The ERCOT Market Summit will be held on February 27th though March 1st. The forum will look at perspectives on ERCOT Market Reform, end-use customers, Plant Retirements, Resource Adequacy and Reliability and dealing with the Impacts of Wholesale Price Volatility in ERCOT.

Forum to Look at Coal Issues – Next Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., New York University Washington, DC Center marks the release of the Winter 2018 Issues in Science and Technology with comments from Charles Herrick and Ana Unruh Cohen.  Herrick and Cohen will discuss how US greenhouse gas regulations affect the coal industry and other energy sectors. They will look at what other factors have led to a decline in the country’s coal use, and how these forces might shape US energy production in the future.

ANS Head to Address Nuke Issues – Next Tuesday, February 27th at Noon, Virginia Tech Research Center – Arlington hosts a speech by Dr. John E. Kelly, Vice-President/President-Elect of the American Nuclear Society.  Kelly recently retired from the U.S. Department of Energy as the Chief Technology and was responsible for establishing the strategic technical direction for the Office of Nuclear Energy’s research, development, demonstration, and deployment portfolios.

Bracewell to Host Infrastructure Event – Bracewell will hold an infrastructure symposium on Thursday March 1st at 9:00 a.m. in 902 Hart. The event will feature Sen. Ted Cruz, CEQ Infrastructure lead Alex Hergott and many other Bracewell experts.

Wilson to Look at Climate, Women – On Thursday, March 1st at 9:30 a.m., the Woodrow Wilson Center hosts a discussion of how climate displacement is changing the role of women in their communities and how women are leading their communities to overcome its impacts. With panelists from the development sector, academia, and journalism, we will look at this issue globally and dive into individual stories of resilience and leadership.

RFF, Stanford Experts Launch Climate, Policy Book – On Friday March 2nd at 9:00 a.m., Resources for the Future (RFF) and the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment hold the public launch of Confronting the Climate Challenge: US Policy Options, a new book that presents a unique framework for evaluating the impacts of a range of US climate-policy options, both for the economy overall and for particular household groups, industries, and regions.  Authors Marc Hafstead and Lawrence Goulder will discuss the book, followed by a moderated Q&A session.

Forum to Look at Resilient Buildings – The Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) hold a briefing on Friday March 2nd at Noon looking at the public/private drive toward resilient buildings.  These are structures that are located, designed and built (or renovated) to withstand extreme weather, cyberterrorism, and other hazards now and for years to come. This briefing will explore what makes buildings resilient; why resilience is important for multiple policy challenges, including infrastructure modernization, emergency preparedness, disaster response, and research funding; and how public-private sector collaboration in research, worker training and investment partnerships benefit society now and well into the future.  Speakers will include National Roofing Contractors Association head and former Rep. Reid Ribble, Debra Ballen of the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety (IBHS) and Paul Totten of WSP USA.

WCEE to Discuss Western Energy Imbalance – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) will hold a lunch and learn forum on Friday, March 2nd to get an overview of the Western Energy Imbalance Market from FERC staff Elisabeth Olson who worked in the California electricity market during EIM implementation.

CERAWEEK Set for Houston CERAWEEK’s 2018 conference will be held in Houston from March 5-9th at the Hilton Americas.  Speakers this year include OPEC SG Mohammad Barkindo, GM’s Mary Berra, BP’s Bob Dudley, IAE’s Fatih Birol, FERC Commissioner Robert Powelson, Alaska Sen. Dan Sullivan, Exelon’s Chris Crane, Energy Transfer’s Kelsey Warren, Paul Spencer of the Clean Energy Collective, Sunnova’s John Berger, and many, many more.

Wilson to Look at Green Finance – On Monday, March 6th at 9:30 a.m., the Woodrow Wilson Center‘s China Environment Forum hosts a discussion of China’s rapid rise as a green finance champion.  CEF is bringing in three experts to delve into the financial and environmental opportunities and risks as China moves into this new era of green financing. Derek Ip, a Senior Analyst at Trucost, will discuss the findings of a recently published report on the financial and water risks in China’s coal-to-chemical sector in western China, and how this risk approach could spur better environmental performance from other pollution- and energy-intense industries in China. Alan Xiangrui Meng, a market analyst in Climate Bonds Initiative’s London office will explore the expanding green bond market in China, which is spurring new environmental protection and clean energy industries, as well as some greyer industries. Carolyn Szum, who heads the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE) Integrated Team on Systems, Economic Analysis, and Modeling, will explain how CERC-BEE is working with U.S. and Chinese financial institutions to develop and pilot innovative financing mechanisms to scale up energy efficiency in China.

Third Way Forum to Look at Future Nukes – Third Way holds its third annual Advanced Nuclear Summit on March 6th in Washington, DC.  As the advanced nuclear sector gets closer to licensing and constructing new power plants, we will explore how nuclear leaders can engage with communities on the ground, how these technologies can help meet their needs, and how to address the challenges that concern them.  The forum is co-hosted by GAIN and the Idaho, Oak Ridge, and Argonne National Labs.

Wind Forum Set – The Business Network for Offshore Wind hold a forum on March 6th at the Hilton Baltimore BWI Airport Hotel.  The forum will look at the regional offshore wind market, discuss opportunities for US developers and Tier 1 and 2 supplier, and listen to available State resources.  Speakers include MEA’s Mary Beth Tung, BOEM’s Daryl Francois and our friends Clint Plummer of Deepwater Wind and Raul Rich of US Wind.
EESI, BSCE to Host Staff Brief on FactBook – The Business Council for Sustainable Energy and the Environmental and Energy Study Institute hosts a lunch briefing on Friday March 9th In 2168 Rayburn focused on the 2018 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook. A panel of executives from BCSE member companies and analysts from Bloomberg New Energy Finance will discuss.

BPC Infrastructure Hub Sets Innovation Forum – The BPC Infrastructure Lab hold its second event in a series on Infrastructure Ideas and Innovations on Tuesday March 13th at 10:00 a.m. The American economy is increasingly driven by a powerful network of billions of “smart” and connected devices, ranging from miniscule sensors to massive industrial machines. From autonomous vehicles to smart water meters, today’s innovations are transforming how we live and how our core industries do business.  These technological advancements also raise important policy questions: What infrastructure investments must be made to ensure that the Industrial Internet of Things (IIOT), the infrastructure that underlies the innovation, has the powerful and reliable communications network needed to sustain it? How can we incorporate IIoT innovations, such as custom private networks that combine satellite-terrestrial technologies, to improve the quality and competitiveness of our infrastructure?

ACORE Renewable Policy Forum Set for Cap Hill – The annual 2018 ACORE Renewable Energy Policy Forum will be held on Capitol Hill on March 14th.  The ACORE National Renewable Energy Policy Forum is the only pan-technology renewable energy policy summit to address federal and state policy. This signature conference brings together industry leaders and policymakers to discuss energy and tax policy, debate pressing issues in the changing electricity marketplace, and identify priorities for Congress, the states, and relevant agencies.

Solar Operations Conference Set – On March 13-14th, Solar Asset Management North America will hold its 5th edition in San Francisco. The event is the leading conference focused on the operational phase of solar plants and portfolios. The recommendations on the Section 201 solar trade case as well as the new tax provisions will also affect the existing assets, budgets and O&M. The conference aims to fully assess and quantify the impact on the future of the solar industry.

Offshore Wind Partnership Forum Set – The Business Network for Offshore Wind hold its 2018 International Offshore Wind Partnering Forum on April 3rd to 6th in Princeton New Jersey.  The IPF is the leading technical conference for offshore wind in the United States and is dedicated to moving the industry forward.  Among the speakers will be BOEM’s Walter Cruickshank and James Bennett, Statoil’s Sebastian Bringsværd, U of Delaware’s Jeremy Firestone, NYSERDA’s Greg Lampman, Recharge’s Darius Snieckus Deepwater’s Jeff Grybowski and NWF’s Collin O’Mara.

WINDPOWER Set for Chicago – The American Wind Energy Assn (AWEA) will hold WINDPOWER 2018 in Chicago from May 7th to 10th.  The industry closed 2017 strong, delivering 7,017 megawatts (MW) of new wind power capacity. That new capacity represents $11 billion in new private investment. There are now 89,077 MW of wind power installed across 41 states, enough to power 26 million American homes.  The wind industry is expected to continue its growth into 2018. WINDPOWER is where the industry comes together to plan for the future and keep this success story growing.

Energy Update: Week of February 12

Friends,

The Winter Olympics are ON!!!!!!  Winners of the first medals of the games for the US were in the were in the Slopestyle Snowboarding race where 17-year-old Red Gerard took the Men’s race Saturday and Jamie Anderson won the Women’s race Sunday. And Women’s Hockey took down Finland.  Before we get going, I always like to mention our friend Scott Segal in the Bacchus parade (this year it’s the 50th year) at the Mardi Gras celebrations that run through Fat Tuesday tomorrow.  Valentine’s Day is Wednesday as is Ash Wednesday.

We start today’s update with analysis on both the just-released infrastructure principles and last week’s energy tax provisions finally approved as part of the Budget deal.  In the infrastructure space, the plan outlines $200 billion of Fed dollars, but leans heavily on states and local governments and private/public partnerships. It also carves out $50 billion for rural infrastructure projects and outlines a strategy to revamp federal project permitting.  We are looking at five major categories:

1) Infrastructure Permitting

2) Public Finance/Appropriations

3) Public/Private Partnerships

4) Innovation

5) Life Cycle Analysis 

There is more on each of these topic areas below, and in the coming days, we will provide a detailed assessment of each. If you are following the infrastructure debate, you’ll want to tune in to a March 1st Bracewell forum on Capitol Hill that we are hosting that will feature insights from policymakers and industry representatives involved in crafting the next key elements infrastructure policy.

On the budget, OMB released FY2019 Budget outlines this Administration’s key funding priorities.  While we always downplay the Admin’s budget, this one is more relevant as it accounts for the Bipartisan Budget Act (aka “the caps deal”) passed by Congress last week.  Look for slight increases in some places like DOE and Interior with some decreases in other places like EPA.  As usual, expect Congress to play a more significant budget role in right-sizing much of this funding.  Experts here can help, so please drop me a note.

The other big story this week is the Business Council for Sustainable Energy will release its annual Sustainable Energy in America Factbook for 2018 on Thursday.  In its 6th year, the Factbook provides new industry information and trends for the U.S. energy economy, with an in-depth look at the energy efficiency, natural gas and renewable energy sectors as well as emerging areas. Also tomorrow afternoon at the Capitol Visitors Center, our friends at Johnson Controls will join a panel on battery sustainability and recycling led by Sen Portman, his Senate Auto Caucus colleagues and the Responsible Battery Coalition.  The Atlantic Council also holds an interesting forum on Iraq and Energy tomorrow.

NARUC Commissioners are in town for their annual Winter Meeting and will be hearing from Lisa Murkowski and many others.   And with ethanol policy in the news lately, the Renewable Fuels Assn’s National Ethanol Conference launches in San Antonio today.

Hearings this week include Wednesday afternoon’s House Energy panel hearing on New Source Review reform featuring our colleague Jeff Holmstead, a former EPA Air Office head and NRDC friend John Walke (I don’t think they will be agreeing much!).  Meanwhile at the same time, a House Resources Committee panel will look at the state of the nation’s water and power infrastructure.

Finally tonight, tune in to the New England Sports Network for the finals of the 66th annual Beanpot college hockey tournament. The first two Monday nights of February in Boston are reserved for the Beanpot, an annual hockey tournament that features Boston College, Boston University, Harvard and Northeastern.  In the Semis last week, nationally-ranked Northeastern blanked BC 3-0, while BU tripped Harvard 3-2 in double OT.  BC-Harvard starts at 4:30 p.m. while the finals go at 7:30 p.m., all at the Boston (TD) Garden.

And in case you missed it, college lacrosse started this past weekend and pitchers and catchers report in just two days with full teams next week for spring training.

Call with questions.  Best,

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

  1. (202) 997-5932

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“After six years of rapid and steady growth, the solar industry faced headwinds that led to a dip in employment in 2017, including a slowdown in the pace of new solar installations. Uncertainty over the outcome of the trade case also had a likely impact on solar jobs growth. At the same time, the fact that jobs went up in 29 states is an encouraging sign that solar is taking hold across the country as a low-cost, sustainable, and reliable energy source.””

Andrea Luecke, President and Executive Director at The Solar Foundation on the release of the National Solar Jobs Census 2017.

INFRASTRUCTURE

Today, the President announced more details regarding the new national infrastructure initiative that he referenced during his State of the Union address.  The details suggest the Administration is taking a new approach to infrastructure—coupling traditional infrastructure concepts with modern approaches to funding and permitting.  This new approach will have significant impacts on the energy industry, manufacturing, utilities, highways, railways, tech, and telecom.

The Role of Infrastructure Permitting – The environmental review and permitting process for energy infrastructure is often unpredictable and challenging.  The White House has suggested expansive reforms to the permitting process intended to improve it through increased coordination of federal agencies, defined timelines, and revisions to the process by which states participate in the permitting process.  These reforms, and in particular the role of states in the permitting process, are likely to generate significant discussions on states’ rights and cooperative federalism.

The Role of Public Finance, Appropriations – The looming question with this infrastructure package is how the government will pay for it, especially given the recently enacted two-year budget deal. The Administration’s stated goal is to leverage roughly $200 billion in direct federal outlays into $1.5 trillion in total infrastructure spending. Doing so will require creativity in identifying revenue sources and developing innovative financing tools that will entice state and local governments to invest alongside private industry. Achieving this ambitious target will require a mix of new loan instruments, federal grant money through the annual Congressional appropriations process, and an expansion of existing tools such as private activity bonds.

The Role of Public Private Partnerships (P3s) – The ability of private entities to engage with government to rebuild our nation’s infrastructure may be the linchpin of this proposal. The most obvious way for private companies to participate in projects that serve the broader civil interest is through public-private partnerships. But despite the rising prominence of P3s among the states and across the globe, the U.S. government’s ability to employ these tools is hampered by significant statutory and regulatory barriers. In order to harness the skills—and the funds—of the private sector on a trillion-dollar scale, the authority of the federal government to engage in P3s will have to be expanded and the process streamlined.

The Role of Innovation – In addition to conventional infrastructure like roads, bridges, and utilities, the Administration’s plan carves out a place for “transformative” projects that seek to make significant investments in emerging technologies.  The idea is for government to work with private industry to facilitate the next “moon shot” and encourage development of transformative infrastructure projects. From a national 5G network to the next generation of smart grid technologies, policymakers will be looking for innovative infrastructure projects to keep pace with the growing digital economy.

The Role of Life Cycle Analysis – Whether the cause is natural disasters to simple wear-and-tear, our nation’s infrastructure incurs billions of dollars of damage and degradation every year.  The use of life cycle analysis techniques allows planners to better calibrate the long-term economic and environmental impacts of choices made at the front end of a project involving design, materials, and a host of other factors—significantly allowing for more meaningful, long-term infrastructure investment decisions.

THE BUDGET DEAL

Another Shutdown…And a Deal – The budget deal is the big story looking back at late last week.  You may have missed the shutdown because it occurred from about Friday at midnight to Friday Morning when President Trump signed the deal.

Why the Delay? – There was the framework of a deal as far back as Tuesday, Senator Rand Paul slowed the Senate to a crawl Thursday evening objecting into the overall cost of the deal.

Four Corners – The deal is the biggest fiscal package passed by Congress in nearly a decade, which sets new limits on how much the government can spend in the next two years. The deal keeps the government operating on another temporary funding patch until March 23. But Congress must still pass another bill, known as an omnibus, with detailed spending levels for each government program for the rest of this fiscal year, which ends in September.  As part of the deal, military spending will rise to $700 billion for fiscal 2018, roughly 10% above current levels. Domestic spending will also get a boost to $591 billion.

The Energy Piece – The budget deal included tax extenders, which includes the 5-year phase-out tax credits for 48c and 25D (starting on page 209).  The other credits that were modified are the 45J production tax credit for nuclear that is imperative for the future of a nuclear plant in Georgia and the 45Q credit for carbon capture and sequestration. The nuclear production credit eliminates the 2020 placed-in-service deadline in the credit. That frees it up to be used not just to help complete Georgia Power’s Plant Vogtle AP1000 reactor project but also the advanced technologies that represent the future of the nuclear sector, such as NuScale Power’s small modular reactor design.  The 45Q fix gives a boost to pioneering efforts such as NET Power that could capture and use all the carbon emitted from facilities powered by both coal and natural gas. The 45Q incentive has the potential to dramatically boost commercial carbon capture deployment in the U.S., which can also lead to significant increases in enhanced oil recovery and other economic benefits.

ClearPath Weighs in on Nuclear, CCS – The ClearPath Foundation said Congress delivered a potentially game-changing clean energy victory by fixing two critical carbon capture and advanced nuclear tax incentives as part of the broader budget deal.   “This is an awesome one-two punch for the future of U.S.-led clean and reliable energy,” ClearPath Action Executive Director Rich Powell said.  “This is not only a big win for two of our most important clean energy prospects but also a product of tremendous bipartisan teamwork,” ClearPath Action Founder Jay Faison said. “This can serve as a template both for the commercialization of technologies preventing an enormously consequential amount of CO2 from going into the atmosphere as well as future collaboration in Congress to continue to give the U.S. a much-needed innovation edge over China.”

CCS Credits Help Nat Gas Too – Speaking of the success on CCS, ClearPath’s Faison also explained in a blogpost last week prior to the vote that carbon capture is not just crucial to the future of coal but also a valuable insurance policy for our booming natural gas industry. Tax credits will allow us to affordably scale up carbon capture from natural gas at NET Power and elsewhere and protects our gas industry from whatever supercharged Clean Power Plan a future Democratic White House will inevitably throw at the power sector, Jay wrote. It could mean coal and gas can both have a future that’s clean and bright, no matter who wins the White House or what regulators in Europe and China decide on.

GEO Praises Inclusion of Orphan Tax Credits – The geothermal heat pump industry was relieved they have finally received the tax Credits they have been lacking since they were left out of the 2015 deal.   Geothermal Exchange Organization (GEO) executive Ryan Dougherty said the deal marks a significant step toward achieving our goal of tax parity.  “Geothermal heat pumps are 100% ‘Made in the USA’ with American-made components manufactured and installed by American workers. With the extension of federal tax credits being revived, the entire geothermal supply chain, including manufacturers, distributors, dealers, contractors, installers, drillers – plus all the families and small businesses that they support – will finally get the relief we have needed since being left on the sidelines in 2015. AHRI’s Joe Trauger said all of these credits and deductions “provide welcome incentives for American consumers and businesses to replace aging, less efficient equipment with that that is saves energy and helps the environment.”

BCSE Raises Concerns about Multi-Year Extension – The Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE) President Lisa Jacobson praised the passage of the clean energy tax provisions as part of the Bipartisan Budget Act this week. But they also raised concerns about the lack of parity between clean energy tax measures continues to hinder investment and job creation in a number of sectors that contribute to a diverse, reliable and affordable energy system. BCSE had called for multi-year extensions of all the pending energy extenders and also sought to modify or expand tax measures to level the sustainable energy playing field for waste heat to power, energy storage, and commercial geothermal. BCSE is disappointed that the Bipartisan Budget Act did not adopt those proposed changes.

NEORI: Deal is Landmark Victory for CCS – The National Enhanced Oil Recovery Initiative (NEORI) said the 45Q credit will drive private investment in commercial deployment of technologies to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plants and industrial facilities for enhanced oil recovery and other forms of geologic storage and for beneficial uses of CO2. The victory represents one of the most significant energy and environmental accomplishments by Congress in recent memory according to Brad Crabtree of the Great Plains Institute, which co-convenes NEORI with the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions. “Passage of this legislation highlights the potential for carbon capture to marshal support across the political spectrum for a policy that will boost American energy production, reduce carbon emissions, protect and create high-wage jobs, and increase federal and state revenue.” C2ES President Bob Perciasepe, said leaders from both parties have demonstrated a commitment to reducing carbon emissions while protecting and creating jobs and investing in new American industries.

IN THE NEWS

EIA Releases Annual Energy Outlook – The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released the Annual Energy Outlook 2018 (AEO2018) last week providing modeled projections of domestic energy markets through 2050.  The report includes cases with different assumptions regarding macroeconomic growth, world oil prices, technological progress, and energy policies. Strong domestic production coupled with relatively flat energy demand allow the United States to become a net energy exporter over the projection period in most cases. In the Reference case, natural gas consumption grows the most on an absolute basis, and nonhydroelectric renewables grow the most on a percentage basis.  EIA said the US will become a net exporter of energy by 2022, four years earlier than it projected last year.  EIA’s forecast predicts that oil production will taper off around 2040 as the shale fields currently operating are tapped out, but not before increasing to about 12 million barrels a day.

Renewables Also Booming – The latest issue of FERC’s Energy Infrastructure Update (with data through December 31, 2017) says renewable sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, wind) accounted for half (49.85%) of the 24,614 megawatts (MW) of new U.S. electrical generating capacity placed into service in 2017. New natural gas capacity accounted for 48.67%, with the balance coming from waste heat (0.89%), nuclear (0.41%), and oil (0.16%). There was no new coal capacity added during 2017.  Growth in new solar capacity has been most dramatic. By the end of 2017, installed generating capacity at utility-scale (i.e., 1-MW or larger) solar facilities totaled 30.30 GW – roughly eight times (7.77%) greater than that FERC reported five years ago in its December 2012 “Energy Infrastructure Update.” Solar is now 2.55% of total U.S. installed utility-scale generating capacity. Moreover, inasmuch as FERC data do not include distributed solar (e.g., rooftop PV), actual U.S. solar capacity is significantly higher – perhaps 30% or more. Combined, the generating capacity of non-hydro renewables is 73.89% greater than that reported five years ago.

Solar Foundation Report Raises 2018 Concerns – All the new on renewables is not totally good.   New solar tariffs risk solar jobs in 2018 according to a new report from the Solar Foundation.  The solar industry employment declined in 2017, while jobs increased in numerous states with emerging solar markets, according to the National Solar Jobs Census 2017, the Foundation’s 8th annual report on solar employment.  The Solar Jobs Census found that 250,271 Americans work in solar as of 2017, representing a 3.8 percent decline, or about 9,800 fewer jobs, since 2016. This is the first year that jobs have decreased since the Solar Jobs Census was first released in 2010.  However, the long-term trend continues to show significant jobs growth. The solar workforce increased by 168% in the past seven years, from about 93,000 jobs in 2010 to over 250,000 jobs in 2017.

Interesting Solar Facts – Some key findings from the National Solar Jobs Census 2017 include:

  • Demand-side sectors (installation, sales & distribution, and project development) make up almost 78 percent of overall solar industry employment, while manufacturing makes up 15 percent. Demand-side sectors lost approximately 7,500 jobs in 2017, while manufacturing lost about 1,200 jobs.
  • The solar industry is more diverse than comparable industries, but more needs to be done to ensure it is representative of the greater U.S. population. Women made up 27% of the solar workforce in 2017, down 1% from 2016. Veterans made up 9% of solar workers, which is 2% more than the overall U.S. workforce.
  • Solar employs twice as many workers as the coal industry, almost five times as many as nuclear power, and nearly as many workers as the natural gas industry. (These comparisons with other industries are based on 2016 jobs numbers, the most recent data available for an apples-to-apples comparison.)

Canadians Suing; EU Worried about Solar Tariffs – Canadian solar manufacturers challenged the Trump administration’s imposition of tariffs in the International Court of Trade. Ontario-based Silfab Solar, Heliene and Canadian Solar Solutions Inc., along with U.S.-based distributor Canadian Solar, filed the challenge, claiming that an investigation last year by the International Trade Commission found Canadian products don’t significantly hurt U.S. manufacturers and don’t account for much of the overall imports of solar cells to the country. The complaint was filed now because Customs and Border Protection began collecting the tariff on Wednesday, creating the injury for the companies. Meanwhile, the European Union said it is seeking compensation through the World Trade Organization, citing Germany’s significant production of solar panels for the North American market.

RUS Appointee Praised by NRECA, UTC – Missouri Co-op head Kenneth Johnson has been nominated by President Trump to lead the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utilities Service. Johnson is general manager and CEO of Co-Mo Electric Cooperative and president for Co-Mo Connect in Missouri NRECA head former Rep. Jim Matheson said they were “excited and thrilled” to hear the news. “The ongoing collaboration between RUS and electric co-ops remains essential to the success of rural communities across the nation as co-ops invest in infrastructure upgrades to modernize the grid and meet consumer expectations. Ken is exceptionally qualified to serve in this role.” Utilities Technology Council CEO Joy Ditto added Johnson is an outstanding person to lead the Rural Utilities Service. “His background is perfectly suited for this position, as he understands the needs of utilities in rural America. He led deployment of a fiber-to-the-home broadband network in rural Missouri that provides robust, affordable and reliable broadband services to 15,000 homes and businesses.

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Murkowski, FERC Commissioners to Address NARUC – The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners holds its annual Winter Policy Summit today through Wednesday.   The Summit will convene an array of speakers from federal agencies, industry, the media, advocacy organizations and more.  Keynote speakers Include Senate Energy Chair Lisa Murkowski, FCC Chair Mignon Clyburn, FERC Chair Kevin McIntyre, as well as FERC Commissioners Cheryl LaFleur and Rick Glick, Reps. Bill Johnson and Tom Reed and Montana PUC Chair Travis Kavula.  Other speakers include Southern’s Bruce Edelston, SEIA’s Sean Gallagher, IECA’s Paul Cicio, Business Council for Sustainable Energy’s Ruth McCormick, Kyle Rogers of AGA, Statoil’s Kevin Maule, ACCCE’s Paul Bailey and our friend Dave Shepardson of Reuters.

WRI Climate Head to Address Group – Paula Caballero, Global Director of the World Resources Institute’s Climate Program, will be featured at keynote speaker today at 3:00 p.m. at the National Press Club. She will be joined by a distinguished panel for lively debate featuring panelists GWU’s Kathleen Merrigan, Leonard Jordan of USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service and RFF’s Ann Bartuska.

National Ethanol Conference Set – The Renewable Fuels Association holds its 23rd annual National Ethanol Conference today through Wednesday in San Antonio.  Former Presidential Advisor Mary Matalin and veteran Democratic Political Strategist Donna Brazile are scheduled to speak together at the event on Washington Politics.

Forum to Look at Transmission – WIRES and the Environmental and Energy Study Institute will host a briefing tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. on the widespread, substantial, and long-lasting benefits of investment in electric transmission. The briefing will showcase two London Economics International studies – one study quantifies the future benefits of transmission investment based on two hypothetical projects, the second dispels many of the myths that deter and delay transmission investment.  This panel will discuss why transmission should be a major component of the infrastructure conversation and how the economic and societal benefits from a robust high-voltage grid are so important. Speakers study author Julia Frayer of London Economics International, ITC’s Nina Plaushin and former FERC Chair James Hoecker.

Forum to Look at Iraq, Energy – Tomorrow at Noon, the Atlantic Council will hold a conversation with a panel of experts to discuss Iraq’s energy potential, export opportunities, and the influence of political dynamics on reforming the energy sector.  Speakers will include Luay Al-Khatteeb of the Iraq Energy Institute, Harith Hasan Al-Qarawee of the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East and Atlantic Council Global Energy Center director Ellen Scholl.

Holdren to Address UMd Forum – The University of Maryland at College Park hosts an interactive discussion tomorrow at Noon featuring Dr. John Holdren and the University of Maryland Global Sustainability Initiative.  Currently the Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Holdren served as assistant to the president for science and technology and director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy during the Obama Administration.

Forum to Look at Battery Sustainability – Tomorrow at 2:00 p.m. in the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center SVC-214, the U.S. Senate Auto Caucus, Sen. Rob Portman and the Responsible Battery Coalition will host a forum focused on vehicle battery sustainability and recycling.  Featured panelists will include Responsible Battery Coalition head Pat Hayes, Ramon Sanchez of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Johnson Controls’ sustainability expert Adam Muellerweiss, Jonathan Moser of Lafarge Canada, AutoZone’s Ray Pohlman and Micah Thompson, environmental affairs exec with Advance Auto Parts.

House Energy Look at NSR – The House Energy & Commerce panel on the Environment will holds a hearing Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. to look at New Source Review permitting challenges for manufacturing and infrastructure.  The hearing with feature former PEA Air Office Head and Bracewell colleague Jeff Holmstead, former OMB official and AF&PA policy Head Paul Noe, NRDC’s John Walke, Arkansas DEQ  air director Stuart Spencer, PA Chamber official Kevin Sunday and GWU Law Professor Emily Hammond.

House Resources to Look at Water, Power Infrastructure – The House Natural Resources Committee’s Subcommittee on Water, Power and Oceans will hold an oversight hearing on Wednesday at 2:00 p.m.  looking at the state of the nation’s water and power infrastructure.

BCSE to Release Annual Sustainability ReportBloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) and the Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE) will release of the 2018 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook in Washington, DC, on Thursday at 9:30 a.m.  Speakers include BNEF’s Ethan Zindler and Rachel Luo, BCSE’s Lisa Jacobson, SEIA’s Abby Hopper, AWEA’s Tom Kiernan, NHA’s Jeff Leahey, AGA’s Dave McCurdy and Mark Wagner of Johnson Controls.  The panel will look at the cost of energy for consumers and businesses, and how has this changed over time; U.S. ranking for energy prices and clean energy investment; clean energy contributions to American jobs and other items.  There will be a second stakeholder briefing at Noon.

FERC Meeting Set – On Thursday at 10:00 a.m., FERC will hold open meeting.

Senate Foreign Relations to Hold Fannon Nom Hearing – The Senate Committee on Foreign Relations will meet on Thursday at 10:00 a.m. to consider several nominations including our friend Frank Fannon to be an Assistant Secretary of State (Energy Resources).

House Science to Look at STEM – The House Science Research and Technology Subcommittee holds a hearing Thursday at 10:00 a.m. on mentoring, training and apprenticeships for STEM education and careers.

House Resources to Look at Critical Minerals – On Thursday at 2:00 p.m., the House Resources Committee will hold a hearing on national strategic and critical minerals production.

Solar Tariff Proponents Discuss Case on Hill – Advocates for the tariffs on solar components will hold a staff briefing on Thursday at 1:00 p.m. in 2253 Rayburn to discuss their Section 201 “global safeguard” case on solar imports and steps forward for Suniva and SolarWorld.  Tim Brightbill and Warren Payne will speak.

IN THE FUTURE

FEBRUARY 19 – President’s Day Holiday.

Forum to Look at FERC Decision on Grid NOPR – On Wednesday, February 21st at Noon, the Global America Business Institute will host a presentation on the FERC Response to grid resilience in RTOs and ISOs.  The speaker will be Judah Rose, Senior Vice President and Managing Director at ICF International.

EMA To Hold Roundtable – The Emissions Marketing Association will hold roundtable Thursday, February 22nd in Juno Beach, Florida at the offices of NextEra Energy.  The event will include presentations, Q&A, and networking opportunities to allow for dialogue among the attendees.

WEN HAPPY HOUR – The Women’s Energy Network holds its winter Happy Hour reception on Thursday February 22nd at 5:30 p.m. at Matchbox Bistro in Chinatown.

SEPA Head to Speak to Renewable Group – The Women of Renewable Industries and Sustainable Energy will hold a WRISE DC lunch and learn with Julia Hamm, President and Chief Executive Officer of Smart Electric Power Alliance (SEPA) on Friday February 23rd at Noon.  .Hamm will discuss her recent trips to and work with Puerto Rico, what SEPA is doing more broadly, as well as take-aways from her decades of work in renewable energy.

Climate, Security Forum Set – On Monday February 26th at 9:30 a.m., the Center for Climate and Security, in partnership with the Environmental and Energy Study Institute, holds their 2018 Climate and National Security Forum: A Responsibility to Prepare. This year’s forum panels will focus on the risks that climate change presents to national security on an operational and strategic level, and the challenges and opportunities in preparing to counter and manage those risks.

BP Energy Outlook Set for Release – The CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host the U.S. launch of BP Energy Outlook 2018 on Monday February 26th at 9:30 a.m. Spencer Dale, chief economist of BP, will present the findings of the outlook followed by a moderated conversation with Sarah Ladislaw, director and senior fellow of the CSIS Energy & National Security Program.

BPC to Focus on Nuclear Energy Exports – The Bipartisan Policy Center hold a discussion next Monday at 10:00 a.m. with members of DOE, the U.S. nuclear energy industry, academia, and the Nuclear Innovation Alliance looking at the vital role that the export control regulations play in nuclear energy commerce and nonproliferation efforts. The conversation will focus on recommendations from a recent Nuclear Innovation Alliance report on how the regulations and their implementation can be improved.  Speakers will include NNSA’s Kate Strangis and Matt Bunn of the Harvard Kennedy School.

CSIS to Look at Short-Term Oil Outlook – The CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a conference Tuesday February 27th on the short-term outlook for U.S. tight oil production and its implications for global oil markets.  As we enter the new year with renewed commitment from the OPEC/non-OPEC partnership, Brent has continued to climb from $45 per barrel low in 2017 to $70 in January 2018. Global economic growth continues to look robust, oil stocks are clearly in decline, geopolitical challenges remain ever-present, and market sentiment looks bullish (for now). However, persistently higher prices have the potential to bring on additional supply from both OPEC and non-OPEC sources.  In this context, much attention is being directed to prospective U.S. supply growth. Based on assessments of resource strength, well productivity, hedging activity, cash flow, break even costs, and a sizeable backlog in drilled-but-uncompleted wells (DUCs), estimates of U.S. near-term output vary widely and challenges remain. Against this backdrop, the CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a distinguished group of experts to discuss the outlook moving forward.  Our friend Paul Sankey will speak at the event.

ERCOT Market Forum Set – The ERCOT Market Summit will be held on February 27th though March 1st. The forum will look at perspectives on ERCOT Market Reform, end-use customers, Plant Retirements, Resource Adequacy and Reliability and dealing with the Impacts of Wholesale Price Volatility in ERCOT.

CERAWEEK Set for Houston CERAWEEK’s 2018 conference will be held in Houston from March 5-9th at the Hilton Americas.  Speakers this year include OPEC SG Mohammad Barkindo, GM’s Mary Berra, BP’s Bob Dudley, IAE’s Fatih Birol, FERC Commissioner Robert Powelson, Alaska Sen. Dan Sullivan, Exelon’s Chris Crane, Energy Transfer’s Kelsey Warren, Paul Spencer of the Clean Energy Collective, Sunnova’s John Berger, and many, many more.

Third Way Forum to Look at Future Nukes – Third Way holds its third annual Advanced Nuclear Summit on March 6th in Washington, DC.  As the advanced nuclear sector gets closer to licensing and constructing new power plants, we will explore how nuclear leaders can engage with communities on the ground, how these technologies can help meet their needs, and how to address the challenges that concern them.  The forum is co-hosted by GAIN and the Idaho, Oak Ridge, and Argonne National Labs.

WINDPOWER Set for Chicago – The American Wind Energy Assn (AWEA) will hold WINDPOWER 2018 in Chicago from May 7th to 10th.  The industry closed 2017 strong, delivering 7,017 megawatts (MW) of new wind power capacity. That new capacity represents $11 billion in new private investment. There are now 89,077 MW of wind power installed across 41 states, enough to power 26 million American homes.  The wind industry is expected to continue its growth into 2018. WINDPOWER is where the industry comes together to plan for the future and keep this success story growing.

EESI, BSCE to Host Staff Brief on FactBook – The Business Council for Sustainable Energy and the Environmental and Energy Study Institute hosts a lunch briefing on Friday March 9th In 2168 Rayburn focused on the 2018 Sustainable Energy in America Factbook. A panel of executives from BCSE member companies and analysts from Bloomberg New Energy Finance will discuss.

BPC Infrastructure Hub Sets Innovation Forum – The BPC Infrastructure Lab hold its second event in a series on Infrastructure Ideas and Innovations on Tuesday March 13th at 10:00 a.m. The American economy is increasingly driven by a powerful network of billions of “smart” and connected devices, ranging from miniscule sensors to massive industrial machines. From autonomous vehicles to smart water meters, today’s innovations are transforming how we live and how our core industries do business.  These technological advancements also raise important policy questions: What infrastructure investments must be made to ensure that the Industrial Internet of Things (IIOT), the infrastructure that underlies the innovation, has the powerful and reliable communications network needed to sustain it? How can we incorporate IIoT innovations, such as custom private networks that combine satellite-terrestrial technologies, to improve the quality and competitiveness of our infrastructure?

ACORE Renewable Policy Forum Set for Cap Hill – The annual 2018 ACORE Renewable Energy Policy Forum will be held on Capitol Hill on March 14th.  The ACORE National Renewable Energy Policy Forum is the only pan-technology renewable energy policy summit to address federal and state policy. This signature conference brings together industry leaders and policymakers to discuss energy and tax policy, debate pressing issues in the changing electricity marketplace, and identify priorities for Congress, the states, and relevant agencies.

Solar Operations Conference Set – On March 13-14th, Solar Asset Management North America will hold its 5th edition in San Francisco. The event is the leading conference focused on the operational phase of solar plants and portfolios. The recommendations on the Section 201 solar trade case as well as the new tax provisions will also affect the existing assets, budgets and O&M. The conference aims to fully assess and quantify the impact on the future of the solar industry.

 

Energy Update 1/16

Friends,

Holy cow…I still can’t believe Minnesota stayed alive by winning that playoff football game on Sunday.  NHL All-Star game in Tampa this weekend (with the awesome 3-on-3 format), Super Bowl Sunday is just three weeks away and the Winter Olympics starts right after in South Korea.

We are early today because of a number of events in this short week. The bulk of the oxygen this week will focus on the budget with a Friday deadline to extend government funding.  There is also a lot of activity on the trade issues with NAFTA, aluminum, steel, washing machine and solar issues all seeing discussions.  In fact, in an editorial Friday, the Washington Post hit the President’s approach to trade, saying that it be exceedingly difficult to achieve his goal of tearing down international trade actions.  The Post said not all trade deals were perfect, but “broadly speaking, increasingly free trade over the past 70-plus years has brought tremendous benefits both to the hundreds of millions lifted out of poverty in Asia, Africa and Latin America and to Americans who have enjoyed a wider choice of quality products, at lower cost, and high wages in export industries.”

As mentioned, Congress is in town despite the MLK holiday yesterday to deal with the budget. Hearings include this morning’s Senate Energy hearing on the domestic/global energy outlook with IEA’s Faith Birol and a Senate Environment hearing on water infrastructure tomorrow.  House Energy looks at Superfund and House Resources looks at onshore energy burdens on Thursday and Friday, a House Energy panel looks at LNG exports.

The Detroit Auto Show started yesterday (Washington’s policy show starts next week) while BPC hosts FERC’s Neil Chatterjee and Cheryl LaFleur, Heritage hosts a NAFTA forum and CSIS hosts launch of the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2017 today.  Thursday, the US Energy Assn will hold its 14th annual State of the Energy Industry Forum at the National Press Club, the Chamber holds an infrastructure summit featuring INGAA’s Don Santa and RFF hosts author/expert Daniel Raimi for a book event on his new natgas drilling book.  On Friday, the US Assn of Energy Economists hosts its January luncheon looking at the natgas and battery revolutions.

Finally, after last week’s reacts to the new 5-year drilling plan and the Florida removal, public hearings start today with a meetings in Annapolis and Jackson Mississippi.  Richmond hosts tomorrow and Thursday, things move to Dover, DE.  More hearings next week and through the end of February.

One last time: we rolled out 10 Top Issues for 2018 in the Update.  Issues include Ethanol, trade, taxes, regs, climate, legal challenges, HFCs, Infrastructure, autonomous vehicles and electricity markets.

Finally, you know what today is…  I’ve already had a singing gorilla wish me happy 50th in our morning meeting that to my wife Stacey.  Here is a copy of last year’s POLITICO Playbook Birthday of the Day Q&A.  And I noticed that I have dropped to #2 on Playbook’s Jan 16th birthday list…  Labor Sect Acosta shares the day although I have him by one year.  Damn you, Carl’s Jr.!!!!

Call with questions.  Best,

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

  1. (202) 997-5932

10 Top Issues for 2018

  1. Ethanol and a “deal” – One of the biggest issue last year was the battle over the RFS, RINs and ethanol.  The issues reached the highest levels of the White House where they expressed an interest in finding a win-win resolution that solves compliance problems while preserving the biofuels program.  This may be one of the early issues to see action this year because it continues to impact volume obligations, confirmations and other items, as well as potential legislative action, which is always a heavy lift.
  2. Solar, Steel, other Tariff/Trade issues – The President has demanded tariffs and January will be a key moment for this discussion.   He faces deadline on steel and solar and continues to hear internal pulls from Economic Advisor Gary Cohn and others who see tariffs as a major concern.  On the Solar case, the solar industry and a broad group of opponents that includes retailers, contractors, utilities and conservatives have urged the President to reject tariffs that could harm the entire industry. As well, look for action on the administration’s efforts to rework NAFTA, whose negotiations have dragged into at least the first quarter of this year.  Congress also started to look at the NAFTA impacts on energy which is likely to remain a central topic.
  3. Taxes and more taxes – With the Tax bill passed and in motion, there will be many tax implications in place over 2018.  Some will be very political and some will be below the radar, but we are certain that you will hear about it.  What you will also hear about as we approach the next budget deadline on January 19th is the potential to have a long-promised tax extenders package that includes incentives for biodiesel blenders, fuel cells, small wind, Geothermal Heat Pumps, distributed wind, CHPs and many other small, but innovative technologies.  Senate Finance Chairman Orrin Hatch unveiled a bill containing a smorgasbord of renewable energy credits just before the holidays, and House Chair Kevin Brady has vowed to move this year.
  4. Slowing regulations in all corners – The White House was most aggressive in 2017 pulling the current regulatory regime back from the previous Administration’s overreach.  This effort will remain a key priority in 2018 because it is one place where the Administration remain largely in control of the process.  Among the regulations in the crosshairs include the Clean Power Plan, WOTUS, offshore drilling issues, other climate action, ozone restrictions, well construction for natgas wells and a new approach to enforcing bird death restrictions.  We have experts on all topics so feel free to reach out.
  5. Climate ups and downs – While 2017 focused largely on the withdrawal from the voluntary Paris Accord, the Clean Power Plan repeal/replace, what climate websites were changed and other carping about the new Administration not caring enough about climate, 2018 promises to be focused on much of that and more state issues that form new ideas to reduce emissions.  While a lot of it will be couched in political clouds, these types of initiatives – along with expanded use of natural gas, and renewables in the regular power mix – will actually reduce our emissions.  Already we are beating many of our targets, while Germany and many other Paris signers are struggling to reduce emissions.  And don’t think that progress will stop political attacks or legal actions against the Trump Administration or companies.
  6. Lawsuit Central – Understanding #4 & #5, it seems like more legal battles is a hardy perennial, but in 2018 legal challenges on the climate, regulations will again play a prominent role.  Unlike previous years when Republican AGs like now EPA head Scott Pruitt and WV’s Pat Morrisey led the charge, this year Democrat AGs in Blue states – buoyed by environmental activists – will lead efforts to file suits against the Trump Administration. Lawyers will be busy, including those inside EPA who are already prepping for each fight by being very careful in how they write new rules.
  7. HFC issues and the Kigali Amendment – The Kigali amendment was signed in late 2016 as part of the Montreal Protocol. Its aim is to reduce the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in air conditioners and refrigerators.  Early in 2018, the big news will be whether the administration follows through on statements from late last year where they vowed to fund efforts to implement it and send the amendment to the Senate for a ratification vote.  The Treaty is binding and goes into effect in 2019 since many countries already have ratified it.  The agreement was supported by both industry, environmental and other sustainability groups, and holds China, India and others to binding limits as global AC and refrigerant use grows globally.
  8. Infrastructure – The most important word for 2018 is infrastructure.  Why? Because it is an election year and infrastructure sells in both parties.  The President is expected to unveil a long-awaited statement of infrastructure “principles” soon and some see the push as an opportunity to advance energy and water infrastructure investments. This means pipelines, transmission and other generation assets.  While the larger infrastructure debate will take on many shapes, energy will play a significant role in the form of new pipeline approvals to move new natural gas, export terminals to get it our resources to foreign markets and important generation assets like new nuclear projects, renewables and gas plants.
  9. Emerging Autonomous Vehicle Rules – Last year, autonomous vehicles began to emerge as a new, important issue.  As the technology and regulatory discussion continues and becomes more defined, there will be more details, innovations and exciting changes for 2018.  Our friends at SAFE have been among the leaders on this issue and have an Autonomous Vehicle Task Force with leading experts to help develop an action plan to facilitate the widespread deployment of this transformative technology.
  10. Electricity markets and the Perry plan – FERC faces an early January deadline (delayed from last month) to respond to the Energy Department’s request to propose a rule that would compensate nuclear and coal plants for resiliency. As our friends at Axios point out, it is a wonky, complex issue, but it remains a battle over nuclear and coal versus gas and renewables.  As natgas prices remain low (as expected for 2018), the market challenges for coal and nukes remain a potential problem.  With many political and energy sectors interests on both sides, it will be a key decision for going forward in 2018.

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“We’ve decided that the best thing for our family and for me and I think, frankly, for North Dakota is for me to seek reelection to the House of Representatives.”

Rep. Kevin Cramer in deciding against running for North Dakota’s US Senate seat and incumbent Heidi Heitkamp.

“Mayor de Blasio turned his back on millions of first responders, police officers, firefighters and other public employees who depend on their pensions to provide for themselves and their families in retirement. Government pension managers have a responsibility by law to seek the greatest return for their investors and pensions that invest in oil and natural gas companies have historically delivered a higher return than other investments. Deliberately hurting pension holders, like the fine men and women who keep our city safe, is a disgraceful way to score cheap political points.”

API New York Executive Director Karen Moreau, commenting on New York Mayor Bill de Blasio’s announcement to divest the city’s pensions from oil and natural gas.

IN THE NEWS

White House Names Fannon to State Energy Gig – So much a for a move to the consulting…Our friend Frank Fannon has been nominated to be an assistant secretary of State on energy resources. Fannon worked at Senate Environment under Jim Inhofe and had an instrumental role in the drafting and passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.  Previously, Fannon was head of BHP Billiton’s DC office and also worked at Murphy Oil Corporation.

ALEC Chair Hit Solar Tariffs – The national chair of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), North Carolina State Rep. Jason Saine urged the President reject solar tariffs in a letter late last week.  Saine wrote Increasing tariffs on solar panels risks shuttering one of the fastest growing segments of our economy. According to recent estimates, the solar industry is creating jobs at a rate 17 times faster than the broader economy and employs over a quarter of a million people across the country.  He also added for utilities like Duke Energy, which must select cost-competitive resources (whether they be fuel-based or renewable) when selecting new generation resources to meet customer demand requirements, such cost increases may eliminate solar generation from its evaluation processes entirely.

ETAC Pushes Back On Protectionist Coalition Claims – In additional to the ALEC letter from Saine, the Energy Trade Action Coalition (ETAC) responded to a letter from the protectionist Coalition for a Prosperous America urging the president to impose a “global tariff” on imports.  ETAC released a letter that strongly encourages Trump to reject the attempt of two foreign-owned bankrupt solar companies, Suniva and SolarWorld, to use the Section 201 trade law process to bail out their creditors and shareholders. “Tens of thousands of U.S. solar industry jobs in the United States now hang in the balance. A decision to impose tariffs and/or quotas on imported solar components may offer Suniva and SolarWorld the short-term lifeline they seek, but it will do so at the cost of undermining virtually the entire rest of the industry, including hundreds of U.S. solar companies that are healthy, productive and providing good-paying jobs in communities across the country.”

China Imports Actually Increasing – A New piece in RealClearMarkets, Allan Golombek argues unilateral reduction of tariffs last month by China on almost 200 consumer products provides further testimony to the fact that the goal of its trade is not just to increase exports, but also imports. Golombek says after years as the world’s biggest exporter, China is on track to becoming the world’s biggest importer over the next few years, according to a paper prepared by two leading economists for the China International Capital Corporation.

EIA Net Exporter of NatGas – The U.S. Energy Information Administration says the U.S. is now a net exporter of natural gas on an annual basis for the first time since at least 1957.  Net exports averaged about 0.4 billion cubic feet per day last year, flipping from net inflows of 1.8 billion in 2016.  EIA also said in its Short-Term Energy Outlook for January, which the share of U.S. total utility-scale electricity generation from natural gas to rise from 32% in 2017 to 33% in 2018 and to 34% in 2019, as a result of low natural gas prices. Coal’s forecast generation share falls from 30% in 2017 to slightly lower than 30% in 2018 and 28% in 2019. The nuclear share of generation was 20% in 2017 and is forecast to average 20% in 2018 and 19% in 2019. Renewables provided almost 10% of electricity generation in 2017, and its 2018 share is expected be similar before increasing to almost 11% in 2019. The generation share of hydropower was more than 7% in 2017 and is forecast to be slightly lower than 7% in both 2018 and 2019.  Finally, EIA added that after declining by 1.0% in 2017, energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are forecast to increase by 1.7% in 2018 and by 0.2% in 2019. Energy-related CO2 emissions are sensitive to changes in weather, economic growth and energy prices.

EPA Delays Climate Rule Comment Deadline – EPA will soon announce dates for additional public hearings on its proposal to repeal the Clean Power Plan and extend the deadline to submit comments. As previously reported, additional hearings will be held in Kansas City, MO on Feb 21, San Francisco on Feb 28 and Gillette, WY on March 27.   EPA will keep the record open for an additional 30 days after the last one.

Wind Group Says More Transmission Necessary – POLITICO outlines a new report from the Wind Energy Foundation finds more U.S. transmission lines are needed to meet the growing demand for renewables. Specifically, the report found transmission planners are not accounting for up to 51 gigawatts of potential near-term procurement.  Can send you copy of report if you need it.

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Detroit Auto Show Launches – The North American International Auto Show is underway and runs until to January 28th.  The event serves as the global stage for companies to debut brand-defining vehicles and industry-shaping announcements.  Press Days start on Sunday where the world’s automotive and mobility leaders gather for three days of worldwide product and technology debuts.  Last January, the 2017 NAIAS featured 71 vehicle introductions, including 46 worldwide debuts. News coming out of NAIAS is heard across the globe as more than 5,100 journalists from 61 different countries annually attend to cover the latest and greatest happenings our industry has to offer.

POLITICO to Host Future of Mobility Event – POLITICO holds an event on “Driverless Cars and the Future of Mobility” today at 10:45 at the 2018 North American International Auto Show. The United States’ roads and highways will soon be driven by autonomous vehicles, which will fundamentally transform the transportation landscape in this country. This technology has the potential to reshape the communities that we live in and create stronger transportation networks for people of all ages and abilities. POLITICO addressing such questions as: When it comes to mobility, what are the sticking points? Will self-driving cars be a mobility revolution for older Americans and for people with disabilities?

BPC to Host LaFleur, Chatterjee – This morning at 10:00 a.m., the Bipartisan Policy Center hosts FERC Commissioners Neil Chatterjee and Cheryl LaFleur to discuss the proposed Grid Resiliency Pricing Rule which was announced last week.  FERC scrapped DOE’s plan and has now undertaken its own process.

Senate Energy to Look at Energy Outlook – The Senate Energy Committee will hold a hearing today at 10:00 a.m. to look at the domestic and global energy outlook from the International Energy Agency’s Fatih Birol.

Heritage to Look at NAFTA, Trade Issues –Today at 12:00 p.m., the Heritage Foundation hosts a forum on how enhancing energy trade with Canada and Mexico will result in more jobs and affordable power for American households and help achieve the Trump Administration’s goal of energy dominance.  Following efforts to modernize NAFTA, opportunities abound for one commonsense policy area that should be preserved and improved: energy. Canada and Mexico are two of America’s most important trade partners in energy markets. Experts on the panel include Bryan Riley, who heads NTU’s Free Trade Initiative; API International Policy advisor Aaron Padilla, Senior Advisor and Daniel Fine of the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy.  Heritage’s Nick Loris moderates.

World Energy Outlook Set For Launch – Today at 1:30 p.m., the CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a forum and the U.S. launch of the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2017. Fatih Birol, Executive Director of the IEA, will present the findings from the report.

Interior to Start Public Hearings on 5-Yr Plan – The Interior Department will start a series of public hearings today to discuss the interior Department’s expanded five-year drilling plan.  Interior will hold meetings today in Annapolis, MD (Double Tree by Hilton) and Jackson, MS (Jackson Marriott), Richmond, VA (Airport Four Points) on tomorrow and Dover, DE (Holiday Inn Downtown) on Thursday.  Other meetings next week will include hearings in Augusta, ME (Jan 22), Baton Rouge, LA (Jan 22), Anchorage, AK (Jan 23), Concord, NH (Jan 23), Boston, MA (Jan 24), Montgomery, AL (Jan 24) and Providence, RI (Jan 25).  Future meetings include Tacoma, WA (Feb 5), Austin, TX (Feb 6), Salem, OR (Feb 6), Tallahassee, FL (Feb 8), Sacramento, CA (Feb 8), Hartford, CT (Feb 13), Columbia, SC (Feb 13), Hamilton, NJ (Feb 14), Albany, NY (Feb 15), Washington, DC (Feb 22), Raleigh, NC (Feb 26) and Atlanta, GA (Feb 28).

Senate Enviro to Look at Water Infrastructure – The Senate Environment Committee holds a hearing tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. to look at water infrastructure.  The hearing will feature a panel of witnesses to focus on Federal issues and impacts including Interior’s deputy assistant secretary for water and science Austin Ewell, Idaho Water Users Association executive director Paul Arrington, Contra Costa Water District GM Jerry Brown, Mike DeVries of the Provo River Water Users Association and Friant Water Authority CEO Jason Phillips.

Smart Cities Summit Set in Chicago – The 2nd annual Smart Cities International Symposium and Exhibition will be held on tomorrow and Thursday in Chicago.  The event brings together municipal professionals and thought leaders to explore technology advances and key lessons to date in achieving the Smart City vision.

USEA to Hosts State of Energy Forum – The US Energy Assn will hold its 14th annual State of the Energy Industry Forum on Thursday at the National Press Club.  The event usually coincides with the U.S. State of the Union Address and is widely regarded as one of USEA’s premier events.  This annual forum brings together leading executives from the most influential and active energy trade associations to present their views, exchange ideas and engage in dialogue on major cross cutting issues facing the energy industry for the year.

Chamber to Host Infrastructure Forum – U.S. Chamber President Tom Donohue will headline a summit on Thursday at 9:30 a.m. focused on modernizing America’s Infrastructure. This dynamic, high energy day-long event will serve to jumpstart important conversations on revitalizing America’s infrastructure, ensure that infrastructure is a top policy priority for 2018, and bring together the business community to voice broad industry support.

Senate Energy to Review DOE Nominees – The Senate Energy Committee will hold a nomination hearing Thursday at 10:00 a.m. to review the nominations of Melissa Burnison to be an Assistant Secretary (Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs), and Anne Marie White to be an Assistant Secretary (Environmental Management), both of the Department of Energy.

Small Biz Committee to Look at DOE Energy Assistance – The House Small Business Committee’s panel on Agriculture, Energy, and Trade will hold a hearing on Thursday at 10:00 a.m. on small business resources at the Department of Energy. The hearing will examine the resources available to small businesses in the energy sector through the Department of Energy.  This hearing will analyze the degree to which these programs are effective at minimizing confusion regarding participation in the federal contracting process and department-specific small business programs.  DOE’s Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Director Charles Smith will testify.

House Energy Panel to Look at Superfund – A House Energy panel will hold a hearing on Thursday at 10:15 a.m. to focus on efforts to reform U.S. EPA’s Superfund program.   Witnesses will Include EPA’s Office of Land and Emergency Management Barry Breen, Steve Cobb of the land division at Alabama’s Department of Environmental Management, former EPA Superfund director and expert Win Porter, Portland Harbor policy analyst  for Oregon Gov. Kate Brown James McKenna, Debbie Mans of the NY/NJ Baykeeper and expert Katherine Probst.

Forum to Look at Report on Japan Energy – On Thursday at 2:00 p.m., the CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a forum with Masakazu Toyoda, Chairman and CEO of the Institute of Energy Economics, Japan (IEEJ) for a presentation of the IEEJ’s Energy Outlook 2018, a report on the future of global energy. The 2018 edition of the outlook broadens its analysis out to 2050.  The outlook finds, despite large improvements in energy efficiency and intensity, global energy demand continues to increase up to 2050; most of this growth comes from non-OECD Asia. Energy-related CO2 emissions in the Advanced Technology Scenario decline after the 2020s but are still very far from reaching half of current levels by 2050. Two-thirds of total reductions are from electricity-related technologies, including non-fossil power, thermal power with CCS, and energy efficiency in power supply/demand.

House Resources Looks at Onshore Energy Burdens – The House Committee on Natural Resources will convene an oversight hearing on Thursday at 2:00 p.m. examining the Department of the Interior’s actions to eliminate onshore energy burdens.  Witnesses will focus on seismic testing, with drilling proponents vowing to improve the ability to conduct the tests that can find oil under the ocean floor.

Hopper to Headline WI Clean Energy Event – SEIA’s CEO Abigail Hopper, clean energy communications expert Jane Bloch, utility executives and industry experts will all be featured at RENEW Wisconsin’s 7th Annual Renewable Energy Summit on Thursday in Madison.

RFF Book Event Highlights Raimi’s Fracking Debate – Resources for the Future will hold a book event on the evening of Thursday to discuss Daniel Raimi’s book on hydraulic fracturing.  Despite the heated debate over “fracking,” neither side has a monopoly on the facts. Raimi’s The Fracking Debate gives a balanced and accessible view of oil and gas development, clearly and thoroughly explaining the key issues surrounding the shale revolution.  The book answers many questions and highlights stories of the people and communities affected by the shale revolution, for better and for worse.  The book provides evidence and context that have so frequently been missing from the national discussion of the future of oil and gas production, offering readers the tools to make sense of this critical issue.

House Energy Panel to Look at LNG – The House Energy & Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Energy will hold a hearing on Friday at 9:15 a.m. looking at legislation addressing LNG exports and PURPA modernization.

Energy Economists Talk Gas, Batteries – On Friday, the US Assn of Energy Economists hosts its January luncheon looking at the Natural gas and battery revolutions.  The event will feature former AGA exec Dr. Benjamin Schlesinger. The shale revolution has made U.S. natural gas plentiful and cheap.  As battery prices fall, affordable storage could bridge the gap between renewables and around the clock reliability in power generation.  In this presentation, Dr. Schlesinger will explore the emerging competitive flash-points, and discuss from his work, gas markets that are at risk from a battery revolution, and vice versa.  He will discuss the key price cross-overs, how the timing might unfold, and think long-term about how low-cost batteries could ultimately affect the future of gas markets.

IN THE FUTURE

BPC to Focus on Infrastructure –On Monday January 22nd at 10:00 a.m., the Bipartisan Policy Center will launch the BPC Infrastructure Lab and “3I” Series—Infrastructure Ideas and Innovations. This new effort is aimed at providing policymakers with fact-based evidence that can shape strategies for restoring America’s infrastructure.  State and local governments across the country are struggling just to repair and maintain their infrastructure systems, let alone expand or upgrade these systems with the latest and greatest technologies. As such, the lab’s first event presents leading public-sector efforts to embed asset management concepts into municipal government practices. In the spotlight: the District of Columbia’s comprehensive asset inventory, which includes 96 percent of all assets owned, a tally of accrued deferred maintenance, and an action plan to improve the District’s infrastructure.

WCEE to Look at 2018 Agenda – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) holds its  6th Annual WCEE Lunch & Learn Brainstorming Event on Tuesday January 23rd at Noon kicking off its Lunch & Learn planning, as well as deciding what topics to cover in 2018.

CSIS to Host Canada Energy Discussion – The CSIS Energy and National Security Program will host a presentation on January 23rd at 9:30 a.m. featuring the National Energy Board’s (NEB) Canada’s Energy Future 2017: Energy Supply and Demand Projections to 2040. This report, part of NEB’s annual Energy Future series, features long-term projections of Canadian energy supply and demand.  The 2017 edition examines how recent energy developments, especially in climate policy, have affected Canada’s energy outlook. The study also includes additional scenarios focusing on long-term climate policy and technology trends. Similar in structure to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Annual Energy Outlook, the report is the only public, long-term Canadian energy outlook that includes all energy commodities in all provinces and territories.

Heritage to Look at Solar Trade Case – Heritage will hold a forum on solar tariff issues on Tuesday January 23rd at Noon.  The event will feature conservative experts, solar companies and many outside groups impacted by higher tariffs.

RFF, Stanford to Hosts Cal Climate Discussion – On January 23rd at 12:00 p.m. at the National Press Club, the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and Resources for the Future will host a forum on insights into California’s commitment to tackling climate change and protecting its natural environment. Panelists will discuss the process for crafting and building support for the climate law and its impacts on industry as well as lessons to be drawn for similar efforts. The panel will feature Pacific Gas and Electric’s Kit Batten, RFF’s Dallas Burtraw and Stanford’s Michael Wara.

Pruitt, Snyder, Others Headline Washington Auto Show – The Washington Auto Show launches on January 23rd and runs through February 4th.  The Washington Auto Show is the Public Policy Show, where the auto industry intersects with the government officials who write and enforce the laws and rules that affect the field. This coming year, one of the focuses of the show will be on connected and autonomous vehicle technology, and the ways pending legislation could impact its development.  Major speakers include EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, Sen. Gary Peters, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, and many others, including representatives from the U.K., South Korea, Japan, China, and the U.A.E. Press Day is January 25th and will feature a sneak peek of the more than 600 cars on the floor of the consumer show. SAFE’s Joe Ryan will be on a SAE panel and autonomous vehicle expert Amitai Bin-nun on will present on policy day panel.

Thune to Hold Auto Innovation Policy Hearing – Speaking of the auto Policy, on policy day next Wednesday at the Walter Washington Convention Center, Sen. John Thune, chair of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a field hearing on automotive innovation and Federal policies.  The hearing will examine self-driving and other auto technologies as well as issues on the horizon for lawmakers and regulators. Days after the hearing, the convention center will open its doors for an industry-wide auto showcase event.  Witnesses include Florida Tech President Randy Avent, Zoox CEO Tim Kentley-Klay, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich, Mike Mansuetti of Bosch North America and Audi Mobility U.S. President Luke Schneider.

Trump to Head to World Economic Forum – The 48th annual World Economic Forum will be held on January 23-26th in Davos, Switzerland.  The Forum engages the foremost political, business and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas.  Trump is likely to discuss his recent efforts to impact trade.

SEJ to Host Annual Journalists Enviro Guide Forum – On Friday, January 26th at 3:00 p.m., the Society of Environmental Journalists, George Mason University and the Wilson Center host their annual forum and report: “The Journalists’ Guide to Energy and Environment,” which previews the top stories of 2018, with comments from a roundtable of leading journalists.  For the last five years, SEJ and the Wilson Center have hosted the only annual event in the nation’s capital featuring top journalists offering their predictions for the year ahead on environment and energy. Always streamed live and always standing room only, this event is essential for anyone working to meet the critical energy and environment challenges facing our nation and the world.  Panelists include AP’s Matt Daly, Nirmal Ghosh of the Straits Times, Bloomberg Environment’s Pat Rizzuto, Wellesley alum Val Volcovici of Reuters, E&E News’ Ariel Wittenberg and several others. Marketplace’s Scott Tong moderates.

State of the Union – President Trump addresses Congress at 9:00 p.m. on Tuesday January 30th.

Pruitt to Head to Senate Environment – The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt will appear before the Committee on Jan. 31st making his first return to the panel nearly a year after his confirmation.

FERC Commissioner Headlines Power Conference – The 31st annual Power and Gas M&A Symposium will be held in New York at the Grand Hyatt Midtown on January 31st and February 1st. The event is an executive conference from S&P Global Market Intelligence that brings utilities, power generators, renewables, and Wall Street together to set the tone for strategic decisions for the year.  FERC Commissioner Neil Chatterjee, my Bracewell colleague Scott Segal and EEI Head Tom Kuhn will all speak, among others.

Hudson Forum to Look at HFC Issues – The Hudson Institute will hold a forum on February 5th to discuss the current status of HFC issues and the Kigali Treaty.

BCSE to Release Annual Sustainability Report – In early February, the Business Council for Sustainable Energy and Bloomberg New Energy Finance will release their annual Sustainable Energy in America Factbook.  More on this soon…

National Ethanol Conference Set – The Renewable Fuels Association holds its 23rd annual National Ethanol Conference on February 12-14 in San Antonio.  Former Presidential Advisor Mary Matalin and veteran Democratic Political Strategist Donna Brazile are scheduled to speak together at the event on Washington Politics.

EMA To Hold Roundtable – The Emissions Marketing Association will hold roundtable Thursday, February 22nd in Juno Beach, Florida at the offices of NextEra Energy.  The event will include presentations, Q&A, and networking opportunities to allow for dialogue among the attendees.

Energy Update: Week of 1/8

Friends,

SO…it looked to me like Seth Meyers wanted to say a lot more last night at the Golden Globes… but the event was calmly empowering.  Besides great wins for James Franco (Disaster Artist) and Frances McDormand (Three Billboards) – which were both fabulous movies; it seems Oprah Winfrey is all the talk of politics, presidents and Hollywood. Let’s watch CBS This Morning with Oprah whisperer Gayle King for more insight on her next move.

Before we get into It, let me first say I was sad but also excited to hear that my long-time friend and fellow Detroit native, Bob Semple, is retiring after 54 years – that right – 54 years at the New York Times.  Many of you will know Bob from his biting and tough editorial wit, as well as deep substance.  While Bob was usually tough on us with his rapid fire questions, he always had time to hear our views – in fact many times to probably pre-counter our argument – and ALWAYS gave us a fair shake.  Bob is a legend and still as sharp as tack.  He says “the page” invited him to still “write when the spirit moves me” so we will may hear from him occasionally, but we will all miss Bob Semple’s daily input.  Congrats to our friend John Broder who steps up to take over Bob’s role.

Last week, the Interior Department rolled out its new five-year drilling plan, which was overly expansive and drew criticism both Republicans and Democrats from most coastal states. The plan Thursday suggests opening vast new stretches of federal waters to oil and gas drilling.  The public hearings start next week on Tuesday in Annapolis and will cover every coastal state over the next two months.  More on the action “In the News.”

The Hill returns back to full action this week with budget discussions taking center stage (maybe if Washington can stop talking about Michael Wolff) with a January 19th funding deadline.  We also have important pending trade decisions on solar and steel, as well as action at FERC on the DOE resiliency proposal all expected to see some action this week.  Speaking of DOE, House Energy has a hearing tomorrow on the DOE Mission where I expect there will be plenty of discussion on the FERC/DOE rule.  Among DOE witnesses will be experts like Clearpath’s Rich Powell.   Then, Wednesday, Senate Environment starts up the infrastructure discussion with focus on water resources issues.

This week, API holds its annual State of Energy Address tomorrow while NY City holds its Clean Power Plan “hearing”.  U.S. Chamber head Tom Donohue delivers his annual “State of American Business” address on Wednesday and CSIS hosts former DOE Secretary Moniz on Thursday.

Next week, the Detroit Auto Show starts on Sunday while BPC hosts FERC’s Neil Chatterjee and Cheryl LaFleur and CSIS hosts launch of the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2017 on Jan 16th.  Speaking of the 16th, make sure you note that it is my 50th birthday.  Blatantly telling you again so you don’t forget…

In case you missed it last week, we rolled out 10 Top Issues for 2018 in the Update.  Issues include Ethanol, trade, taxes, regs, climate, legal challenges, HFCs, Infrastructure, autonomous vehicles, and electricity markets.

Finally, our good friend and retired energy reporter Gerry Karey has a great new book out called Meanderings: Inventions, Fripperies, Bits, & Bobs.  The book is a collection of blogs and essays that is hilarious and thoughtful.  Check out a review here.

The Consumer Electronics show is underway in Vegas. While you might be looking for the latest phones, AI, VR or games, there is a lot of autonomous/electric vehicle technology that is part of show.  Our friends at SAFE are on the ground there and are happy to keep you up to speed.  Stay up late because ‘Bama-Georgia should be pretty good tonight.  Call with questions.  Best,

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

  1. (202) 997-5932

 

10 Top Issues for 2018

  1. Ethanol and a “deal” – One of the biggest issue last year was the battle over the RFS, RINs and ethanol.  The issues reached the highest levels of the White House where they expressed an interest in finding a win-win resolution that solves compliance problems while preserving the biofuels program.  This may be one of the early issues to see action this year because it continues to impact volume obligations, confirmations and other items, as well as potential legislative action, which is always a heavy lift.
  2. Solar, Steel, other Tariff/Trade issues – The President has demanded tariffs and January will be a key moment for this discussion.   He faces deadline on steel and solar and continues to hear internal pulls from Economic Advisor Gary Cohn and others who see tariffs as a major concern.  On the Solar case, the solar industry and a broad group of opponents that includes retailers, contractors, utilities and conservatives have urged the President to reject tariffs that could harm the entire industry. As well, look for action on the administration’s efforts to rework NAFTA, whose negotiations have dragged into at least the first quarter of this year.  Congress also started to look at the NAFTA impacts on energy which is likely to remain a central topic.
  3. Taxes and more taxes – With the Tax bill passed and in motion, there will be many tax implications in place over 2018.  Some will be very political and some will be below the radar, but we are certain that you will hear about it.  What you will also hear about as we approach the next budget deadline on January 19th is the potential to have a long-promised tax extenders package that includes incentives for biodiesel blenders, fuel cells, small wind, Geothermal Heat Pumps, distributed wind, CHPs and many other small, but innovative technologies.  Senate Finance Chairman Orrin Hatch unveiled a bill containing a smorgasbord of renewable energy credits just before the holidays, and House Chair Kevin Brady has vowed to move this year.
  4. Slowing regulations in all corners – The White House was most aggressive in 2017 pulling the current regulatory regime back from the previous Administration’s overreach.  This effort will remain a key priority in 2018 because it is one place where the Administration remain largely in control of the process.  Among the regulations in the crosshairs include the Clean Power Plan, WOTUS, offshore drilling issues, other climate action, ozone restrictions, well construction for natgas wells and a new approach to enforcing bird death restrictions.  We have experts on all topics so feel free to reach out.
  5. Climate ups and downs – While 2017 focused largely on the withdrawal from the voluntary Paris Accord, the Clean Power Plan repeal/replace, what climate websites were changed and other carping about the new Administration not caring enough about climate, 2018 promises to be focused on much of that and more state issues that form new ideas to reduce emissions.  While a lot of it will be couched in political clouds, these types of initiatives – along with expanded use of natural gas, and renewables in the regular power mix – will actually reduce our emissions.  Already we are beating many of our targets, while Germany and many other Paris signers are struggling to reduce emissions.  And don’t think that progress will stop political attacks or legal actions against the Trump Administration or companies.
  6. Lawsuit Central – Understanding #4 & #5, it seems like more legal battles is a hardy perennial, but in 2018 legal challenges on the climate, regulations will again play a prominent role.  Unlike previous years when Republican AGs like now EPA head Scott Pruitt and WV’s Pat Morrisey led the charge, this year Democrat AGs in Blue states – buoyed by environmental activists – will lead efforts to file suits against the Trump Administration. Lawyers will be busy, including those inside EPA who are already prepping for each fight by being very careful in how they write new rules.
  7. HFC issues and the Kigali Amendment – The Kigali amendment was signed in late 2016 as part of the Montreal Protocol. Its aim is to reduce the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in air conditioners and refrigerators.  Early in 2018, the big news will be whether the administration follows through on statements from late last year where they vowed to fund efforts to implement it and send the amendment to the Senate for a ratification vote.  The Treaty is binding and goes into effect in 2019 since many countries already have ratified it.  The agreement was supported by both industry, environmental and other sustainability groups, and holds China, India and others to binding limits as global AC and refrigerant use grows globally.
  8. Infrastructure – The most important word for 2018 is infrastructure.  Why? Because it is an election year and infrastructure sells in both parties.  The President is expected to unveil a long-awaited statement of infrastructure “principles” soon and some see the push as an opportunity to advance energy and water infrastructure investments. This means pipelines, transmission and other generation assets.  While the larger infrastructure debate will take on many shapes, energy will play a significant role in the form of new pipeline approvals to move new natural gas, export terminals to get it our resources to foreign markets and important generation assets like new nuclear projects, renewables and gas plants.
  9. Emerging Autonomous Vehicle Rules – Last year, autonomous vehicles began to emerge as a new, important issue.  As the technology and regulatory discussion continues and becomes more defined, there will be more details, innovations and exciting changes for 2018.  Our friends at SAFE have been among the leaders on this issue and have an Autonomous Vehicle Task Force with leading experts to help develop an action plan to facilitate the widespread deployment of this transformative technology.
  10. Electricity markets and the Perry plan – FERC faces an early January deadline (delayed from last month) to respond to the Energy Department’s request to propose a rule that would compensate nuclear and coal plants for resiliency. As our friends at Axios point out, it is a wonky, complex issue, but it remains a battle over nuclear and coal versus gas and renewables.  As natgas prices remain low (as expected for 2018), the market challenges for coal and nukes remain a potential problem.  With many political and energy sectors interests on both sides, it will be a key decision for going forward in 2018.

 

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“By proposing to open up nearly the entire OCS for potential oil and gas exploration, the United States can advance the goal of moving from aspiring for energy independence to attaining energy dominance,” said. “This decision could bring unprecedented access to America’s extensive offshore oil and gas resources and allows us to better compete with other oil-rich nations.”

Vincent DeVito, Counselor for Energy Policy at Interior on the Department’s new 5-year plan.  

 

IN THE NEWS

Admin Suggests New Areas in 5-Yr Drilling Plan – The Department of Interior announced the next step for developing the National Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program (National OCS Program) for 2019-2024, which proposes to make over 90% of the total OCS acreage and more than 98% of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in federal offshore areas available to consider for future exploration and development. By comparison, the current program puts 94% of the OCS off limits. In addition, the program proposes the largest number of lease sales in U.S. history.

Public Meetings Set – Interior will hold public meetings will take place at locations across the country. Using an open-house format allows participants to arrive any time during the scheduled meeting time and to talk with our team members one-on-one. At the meetings you can ask questions, share information and learn more about the National Program.  The public hearings start next Tuesday and will be in Annapolis, MD (Double Tree by Hilton) and Jackson, MS (Jackson Marriott) on Tuesday January 16th, Richmond, VA (Airport Four Points) on Wednesday January 17th, and Dover, DE (Holiday Inn Downtown) on Thursday January 18th.  Other hearings next week will include hearings in Augusta, ME (Jan 22), Baton Rouge, LA (Jan 22), Anchorage, AK (Jan 23), Concord, NH (Jan 23), Boston, MA (Jan 24), Montgomery, AL (Jan 24) Providence, RI (Jan 25).  Future hearings include Tacoma, WA (Feb 5), Austin, TX (Feb 6), Salem, OR (Feb 6), Tallahassee, FL (Feb 8), Sacramento, CA (Feb 8), Hartford, CT (Feb 13), Columbia, SC (Feb 13), Hamilton, NJ (Feb 14), Albany, NY (Feb 15), Washington, DC (Feb 22), Raleigh, NC (Feb 26) and Atlanta, GA (Feb 28).

Chamber Energy Institutes Commends Expansion – The Chamber’s Global Energy Institute Karen Harbert said the Administration’s Draft Proposed Program unlocks the vast potential of American energy and expands our ability to export oil and gas to our allies around the world. Harbert added the plan is a long-term commitment to securing future US energy and would help cement America’s role as an energy superpower, creating jobs and contributing to the economy.  Harbert: “For decades, our nation has needlessly limited our own ability to harness oil and gas resources. This new plan sets a much different course, allowing far greater access to offshore areas that haven’t been previously accessible using advanced technology to determine where to safely drill.”

Gulf Group Expresses Optimism – Lori LeBlanc, Executive Director of the Gulf Economic Survival Team,

Recognized the new plan as a major sign of optimism for our country’s potential in being the world-leader in energy production. LeBlanc says with increasing OCS access, our country has the opportunity to maximize those natural resources in order to continue producing dependable energy, creating thousands of good-paying jobs and providing immense economic stability for our nation.  “The new plan allows us to maximize America’s abundant OCS oil and gas resources and benefit from the revenues generated by offshore production.”  She added that the Gulf accounts for nearly 20% of our nation’s oil production and contributes over $5 to $8 billion dollars directly to the U.S. Treasury each year — making it the second largest revenue stream for the federal government.”

Ocean Industry Group Praises New PlanNational Ocean Industries Association President Randall Luthi said the new plan is a long anticipated first step towards what could mean more jobs, energy and revenue to the people of the United States.  Luthi said the current Five-Year Program that expires in 2017 included no new access, and put the U.S. far behind many other nations that are actively pursuing offshore oil and natural gas energy development – – particularly in the Atlantic basin and the Arctic.  “The energy resources on the OCS are vital to the nation’s economic prosperity.  Allowing oil and natural gas development in federal waters in the Atlantic alone could result in as many as 280,000 new jobs, $24 billion annually to the economy, $51 billion in government revenue, and the safe production of 1.3 million barrels per day of oil and natural gas.  But frankly, these numbers likely underestimate the potential.

API Welcomes New PlanAPI President and CEO Jack Gerard welcomed the first step in developing a new five-year offshore oil and natural gas leasing program.  Gerard said smart, effective policies, such as prioritizing U.S. potential for expanding natural gas exports will help create jobs here at home and provide energy security to U.S. allies, all while allowing our nation’s energy renaissance to continue benefitting American consumers, workers and the environment. “Developing our abundant offshore energy resources is also a critical part of a forward-looking energy policy, which is why we look forward to working with the administration and Congress on an offshore leasing plan that will fully embrace our nation’s energy potential. Eighty percent of American voters support increased domestic oil and natural gas production, which will help keep energy affordable for consumers, create jobs, and strengthen our national security.  Gerard closed saying it’s important that the next five-year plan includes the ability to explore the resources in the Arctic, Atlantic, and the Eastern Gulf of Mexico, which would spur investment and economic activity, could create thousands of jobs, and provide billions in government revenue.

NatGas Setting Records – Over the past few weeks with the cold temps, the US has been setting natural gas use records.  AGA has been doing some analysis of it on their blog and in the news. Here is a post from last week about how January 1 set the all-time record for single-day gas consumption and we expect it to be beat in the days since.   There will be much more analysis on the next weeks, looking at the factors behind this trend.  More on the projections about Winter here.

Wind Cranking It Out In Cold, Too – The wind industry is doing well in the cold as well. Wind output is up and was strongest during the coldest part last Thursday and Friday, as is typical with extreme weather events.  Consider PJM, where wind output from January 1st to 4th averaged over 3,500MW, 40% above average wind production in January 2016. Further, wind energy generation exceeded forecasts in MISO and PJM on Thursday, January 4. In late 2017, wind power even broke output records in several regions.

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

House Energy Panel to Look at DOE Mission – The House Energy & Commerce Panel on Energy will hold a hearing tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. in 2123 Rayburn looking at DOE Modernization and advancing its mission for national, economic and energy security.  Witnesses will include DOE’s Dan Brouillette, Science office head Paul Dabbar, Energy Undersecretary Mark Menezes and NNSA head Frank Klotz, as well as CSIS’s Sarah Ladislaw, ClearPath’s Rich Powell, Don Levy of UChicago, former EERE head and Stanford Steyer-Taylor Director Dan Reicher, Oak Ridge’s Tom Zacharia and Lilly Research’s Steve Wasserman.

Wilson to Look at Taiwan Energy – The Wilson Center holds a discussion tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. on the political and social, as well as economic ramifications of the options Taipei has to meet its expansive energy needs, and how its decisions may impact Taiwan’s foreign policy.

API’s Annual State of Energy Address – API holds its annual State of Energy Address in the Atrium Ballroom of the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center.  The luncheon starts tomorrow at 12:00 Noon with a CEO Jack Gerard’s speech at 12:30 p.m. and a reporter briefing at 1:15 p.m.

NY to Host CPP Meeting for EPA Comments – The New York AG Eric Schneiderman holds a meeting tomorrow afternoon to provide public comments to EPA on repealing the Clean Power Plan at The New School in NYC.  Schneiderman is calling it a “people’s hearing” 1) as if the residents and miners of WV are not people and 2) certainly most New Yorkers are just regular folks Like everyone else.  My guess it will be very entertaining but not all that valuable to EPA.

Wilson Forum to Look at Taiwan Energy Issues – The Woodrow Wilson Center holds a discussion tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. looking at the political and social, as well as economic ramifications of the options Taipei has to meet its expansive energy needs, and how its decisions may impact Taiwan’s foreign policy.

Hopper, Honorable to Headline WCEE Event – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) will hold a reception at Dentons tomorrow at 6:00 p.m. to discuss lessons learned from political appointees.  The event features a lively discussion about the political appointment process in the energy and environmental fields and will feature a panel of former state and federal political appointees about how they started down the path towards political appointment and navigated the process.  Panelists will share their experiences and candid views about the challenges and rewards of a political appointment, as well as lessons they have learned while in these highly visible roles.  Speakers include SEIA’s Abby Hopper, former director of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; former FERC Commissioner Collette Honorable and Connecticut Consumer Counsel Elin Katz, who is President of the National Association of State Utility Advocates.

WRI Outlines Stories to Watch – On Wednesday at 9:00 a.m., the World Resources Institute hosts in 15th annual Stories to Watch event.  The event is for policymakers, business leaders and media in Washington, DC, and around the world.  Dr. Andrew Steer, WRI President & CEO, will share his insights on the big stories in the environment and international development in the coming year. In this turbulent time, he will explore global trends and emerging issues related to economics, climate change, energy markets, forests, water, security issues and more.

Chamber to Discuss State of American Business – On Wednesday at 9:30 a.m., U.S. Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Thomas J. Donohue will deliver his annual “State of American Business” address, highlighting the emerging opportunities and top challenges facing the business community in the coming year – and beyond. Donohue will also introduce the Chamber’s 2018 policy agenda. Following his remarks, Donohue and Neil Bradley, U.S. Chamber senior vice president and chief policy officer, will participate in a press conference.

Senate Enviro to Look at Water Infrastructure – The Senate Environment Committee hold a hearing Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. on America’s water infrastructure needs and challenges.  Witnesses

CSIS to Host Moniz – On Thursday at 4:00 p.m., CSIS holds a discussion with Ernest J. Moniz, the co-chair and CEO of NTI and former U.S. Secretary of Energy. He will provide remarks on the role of nuclear weapons in today’s increasingly dangerous global security environment, which will be followed by a discussion with John Hamre, president and CEO of CSIS.

IN THE FUTURE

Detroit Auto Show Launches – The North American International Auto Show runs from Saturday to January 28th and serves as the global stage for companies to debut brand-defining vehicles and industry-shaping announcements.  Press Days start on Sunday where the world’s automotive and mobility leaders gather for three days of worldwide product and technology debuts.  Last January, the 2017 NAIAS featured 71 vehicle introductions, including 46 worldwide debuts. News coming out of NAIAS is heard across the globe as more than 5,100 journalists from 61 different countries annually attend to cover the latest and greatest happenings our industry has to offer.

BPC to Host LaFleur, Chatterjee – Next Tuesday, January 16th at 10:00 a.m., the Bipartisan Policy Center hosts FERC Commissioners Neil Chatterjee and Cheryl LaFleur to discuss the proposed Grid Resiliency Pricing Rule. This proposal, drafted by the Department of Energy, calls for an expedited rulemaking to support generators that provide specific reliability and resiliency attributes. FERC is expected to take action on the proposal by January 10.

Heritage to Look at NAFTA, Trade Issues – Next Tuesday, January 16th at 12:00 p.m., the Heritage Foundation hosts a forum on how enhancing energy trade with Canada and Mexico will result in more jobs and affordable power for American households and help achieve the Trump Administration’s goal of energy dominance.  Following efforts to modernize NAFTA, opportunities abound for one commonsense policy area that should be preserved and improved: energy. Canada and Mexico are two of America’s most important trade partners in energy markets. Experts on the panel include Bryan Riley, who heads NTU’s Free Trade Initiative; API International Policy advisor Aaron Padilla, Senior Advisor and Daniel Fine of the New Mexico Center for Energy Policy.  Heritage’s Nick Loris moderates.

World Energy Outlook Set For Launch – Next Tuesday January 16th at 1:30 p.m., the CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a forum and the U.S. launch of the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2017. Fatih Birol, Executive Director of the IEA, will present the findings from the report.

Interior to Start Public Hearings on 5-Yr Plan – The Interior Department will start a series of public hearings starting next Tuesday to discuss the interior Department’s expanded five-year drilling plan.  Interior will hold meetings in Annapolis, MD (Double Tree by Hilton) and Jackson, MS (Jackson Marriott) on Tuesday January 16th, Richmond, VA (Airport Four Points) on Wednesday January 17th, and Dover, DE (Holiday Inn Downtown) on Thursday January 18th.  Other meetings will include hearings in Augusta, ME (Jan 22), Baton Rouge, LA (Jan 22), Anchorage, AK (Jan 23), Concord, NH (Jan 23), Boston, MA (Jan 24), Montgomery, AL (Jan 24) Providence, RI (Jan 25), Tacoma, WA (Feb 5), Austin, TX (Feb 6), Salem, OR (Feb 6), Tallahassee, FL (Feb 8), Sacramento, CA (Feb 8), Hartford, CT (Feb 13), Columbia, SC (Feb 13), Hamilton, NJ (Feb 14), Albany, NY (Feb 15), Washington, DC (Feb 22), Raleigh, NC (Feb 26) and Atlanta, GA (Feb 28).

Smart Cities Summit Set in Chicago – The 2nd annual Smart Cities International Symposium and Exhibition will be held on January 17th and 18th in Chicago.  The event brings together municipal professionals and thought leaders to explore technology advances and key lessons to date in achieving the Smart City vision.

USEA to Hosts State of Energy Forum – The US Energy Assn will hold its 14th annual State of the Energy Industry Forum on Thursday January 18th at the National Press Club.  The event usually coincides with the U.S. State of the Union Address and is widely regarded as one of USEA’s premier events.  This annual forum brings together leading executives from the most influential and active energy trade associations to present their views, exchange ideas and engage in dialogue on major cross cutting issues facing the energy industry for the year.

Forum to Look at Report on Japan Energy – On Thursday January 18th at 2:00 p.m., the CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a forum with Masakazu Toyoda, Chairman and CEO of the Institute of Energy Economics, Japan (IEEJ) for a presentation of the IEEJ’s Energy Outlook 2018, a report on the future of global energy. The 2018 edition of the outlook broadens its analysis out to 2050.  The outlook finds, despite large improvements in energy efficiency and intensity, global energy demand continues to increase up to 2050; most of this growth comes from non-OECD Asia. Energy-related CO2 emissions in the Advanced Technology Scenario decline after the 2020s but are still very far from reaching half of current levels by 2050. Two-thirds of total reductions are from electricity-related technologies, including non-fossil power, thermal power with CCS, and energy efficiency in power supply/demand.

Hopper to Headline WI Clean Energy Event – SEIA’s CEO Abigail Hopper, clean energy communications expert Jane Bloch, utility executives and industry experts will all be featured at RENEW Wisconsin’s 7th Annual Renewable Energy Summit on Thursday January 18th in Madison.

RFF Book Event Highlights Raimi’s Fracking Debate – Resources for the Future will hold a book event on the evening of Thursday January 18th to discuss Daniel Raimi’s book on hydraulic fracturing.  Despite the heated debate over “fracking,” neither side has a monopoly on the facts. Raimi’s The Fracking Debate gives a balanced and accessible view of oil and gas development, clearly and thoroughly explaining the key issues surrounding the shale revolution.  The book answers many questions and highlights stories of the people and communities affected by the shale revolution, for better and for worse.  The book provides evidence and context that have so frequently been missing from the national discussion of the future of oil and gas production, offering readers the tools to make sense of this critical issue.

Energy Economists Talk Gas, Batteries – On Friday January 19th, the US Assn of Energy Economists hosts its January luncheon looking at the Natural gas and battery revolutions.  The event will feature former AGA exec Dr. Benjamin Schlesinger. The shale revolution has made U.S. natural gas plentiful and cheap.  As battery prices fall, affordable storage could bridge the gap between renewables and around the clock reliability in power generation.  In this presentation, Dr. Schlesinger will explore the emerging competitive flash-points, and discuss from his work, gas markets that are at risk from a battery revolution, and vice versa.  He will discuss the key price cross-overs, how the timing might unfold, and think long-term about how low-cost batteries could ultimately affect the future of gas markets.

BPC to Focus on Infrastructure –On Monday January 22nd at 10:00 a.m., the Bipartisan Policy Center will launch the BPC Infrastructure Lab and “3I” Series—Infrastructure Ideas and Innovations. This new effort is aimed at providing policymakers with fact-based evidence that can shape strategies for restoring America’s infrastructure.  State and local governments across the country are struggling just to repair and maintain their infrastructure systems, let alone expand or upgrade these systems with the latest and greatest technologies. As such, the lab’s first event presents leading public-sector efforts to embed asset management concepts into municipal government practices. In the spotlight: the District of Columbia’s comprehensive asset inventory, which includes 96 percent of all assets owned, a tally of accrued deferred maintenance, and an action plan to improve the District’s infrastructure.

WCEE to Look at 2018 Agenda – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) holds its  6th Annual WCEE Lunch & Learn Brainstorming Event on Tuesday January 23rd at Noon kicking off its Lunch & Learn planning, as well as deciding what topics to cover in 2018.

CSIS to Host Canada Energy Discussion – The CSIS Energy and National Security Program will host a presentation on January 23rd at 9:30 a.m. featuring the National Energy Board’s (NEB) Canada’s Energy Future 2017: Energy Supply and Demand Projections to 2040. This report, part of NEB’s annual Energy Future series, features long-term projections of Canadian energy supply and demand.  The 2017 edition examines how recent energy developments, especially in climate policy, have affected Canada’s energy outlook. The study also includes additional scenarios focusing on long-term climate policy and technology trends. Similar in structure to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Annual Energy Outlook, the report is the only public, long-term Canadian energy outlook that includes all energy commodities in all provinces and territories.

Heritage to Look at Solar Trade Case – Heritage will hold a forum on solar tariff issues on Tuesday January 23rd at Noon.  The event will feature conservative experts, solar companies and many outside groups impacted by higher tariffs.

Pruitt, Snyder, Others Headline Washington Auto Show – The Washington Auto Show launches on January 23rd and runs through February 4th.  The Washington Auto Show is the Public Policy Show, where the auto industry intersects with the government officials who write and enforce the laws and rules that affect the field. This coming year, one of the focuses of the show will be on connected and autonomous vehicle technology, and the ways pending legislation could impact its development.  Major speakers include EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, Sen. Gary Peters, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, and many others, including representatives from the U.K., South Korea, Japan, China, and the U.A.E. Press Day is January 25th and will feature a sneak peek of the more than 600 cars on the floor of the consumer show.

Pruitt to Head to Senate Environment – The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt will appear before the Committee on Jan. 31st making his first return to the panel nearly a year after his confirmation.

BCSE to Release Annual Sustainability Report – In early February, the Business Council for Sustainable Energy and Bloomberg New Energy Finance will release their annual Sustainable Energy in America Factbook.  More on this soon…

National Ethanol Conference Set – The Renewable Fuels Association holds its 23rd annual National Ethanol Conference on February 12-14 in San Antonio.  Former Presidential Advisor Mary Matalin and veteran Democratic Political Strategist Donna Brazile are scheduled to speak together at the event on Washington Politics.

EMA To Hold Roundtable – The Emissions Marketing Association will hold roundtable Thursday, February 22nd in Juno Beach, Florida at the offices of NextEra Energy.  The event will include presentations, Q&A, and networking opportunities to allow for dialogue among the attendees.

Energy Update: 1/2/18

Friends,

Welcome to 2018 and back to the action… ALMOST.  Don’t expect we’ll see much going on in this short week, but the Senate does return tomorrow to swear in new members Tina Smith and Doug Jones.

With it being the first week of the New Year, we are rolling out our top 10 Issues for 2018.   Issues include Ethanol, trade, taxes, regs, climate, legal challenges, HFCs, Infrastructure, autonomous vehicles, and electricity markets.

One issue that is important but I didn’t mention is rising crude prices. My friends at Platts did touch on that issue with former EIA head Adam Sieminski and others though in their weekly Podcast. These experts see prices ending 2018 as low as $52/b and as high as $70/b, but a number of factors could significantly alter their path, from OPEC compliance to oil demand in Asia to US trade policy.  My friends at SAFE are always focused on this issue (you can talk to Leslie Hayward) or Kevin Book at ClearView, has also weighed in on this topic.

Mark your calendar for events starting next week, including API holding its annual State of Energy Address and the NY City Clean Power Plan “hearing” next Tuesday, CSIS hosting former DOE Secretary Moniz on Thursday January 11th, the Detroit Auto Show starting January 14th and BPC hosts FERC’s Neil Chatterjee and Cheryl LaFleur, while CSIS hosts launch of the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2017 on Jan 16th.  Speaking of the 16th, make sure you note that it is my 50th birthday.  Blatantly telling you now because I am accepting presents all month…

Finally, I hope you noticed the super cool super moon last night/this morning.  I knew it was out there but I really didn’t get the full impact until I was driving up Massachusetts Avenue this morning and saw it perched over Washington DC.  Pretty awesome.  Call with questions.  Best,

 

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

(202) 997-5932

 

The Top Issues for 2018

  1. Ethanol and a “deal” – One of the biggest issue last year was the battle over the RFS, RINs and ethanol.  The issues reached the highest levels of the White House where they expressed an interest in finding a win-win resolution that solves compliance problems while preserving the biofuels program.  This may be one of the early issues to see action this year because it continues to impact volume obligations, confirmations and other items, as well as potential legislative action, which is always a heavy lift.
  2. Solar, Steel, other Tariff/Trade issues – The President has demanded tariffs and January will be a key moment for this discussion.   He faces deadline on steel and solar and continues to hear internal pulls from Economic Advisor Gary Cohn and others who see tariffs as a major concern.  On the Solar case, the solar industry and a broad group of opponents that includes retailers, contractors, utilities and conservatives have urged the President to reject tariffs that could harm the entire industry. As well, look for action on the administration’s efforts to rework NAFTA, whose negotiations have dragged into at least the first quarter of this year.  Congress also started to look at the NAFTA impacts on energy which is likely to remain a central topic.
  3. Taxes and more taxes – With the Tax bill passed and in motion, there will be many tax implications in place over 2018.  Some will be very political and some will be below the radar, but we are certain that you will hear about it.  What you will also hear about as we approach the next budget deadline on January 19th is the potential to have a long-promised tax extenders package that includes incentives for biodiesel blenders, fuel cells, small wind, Geothermal Heat Pumps, distributed wind, CHPs and many other small, but innovative technologies.  Senate Finance Chairman Orrin Hatch unveiled a bill containing a smorgasbord of renewable energy credits just before the holidays, and House Chair Kevin Brady has vowed to move this year.
  4. Slowing regulations in all corners – The White House was most aggressive in 2017 pulling the current regulatory regime back from the previous Administration’s overreach.  This effort will remain a key priority in 2018 because it is one place where the Administration remain largely in control of the process.  Among the regulations in the crosshairs include the Clean Power Plan, WOTUS, offshore drilling issues, other climate action, ozone restrictions, well construction for natgas wells and a new approach to enforcing bird death restrictions.  We have experts on all topics so feel free to reach out.
  5. Climate ups and downs – While 2017 focused largely on the withdrawal from the voluntary Paris Accord, the Clean Power Plan repeal/replace, what climate websites were changed and other carping about the new Administration not caring enough about climate, 2018 promises to be focused on much of that and more state issues that form new ideas to reduce emissions.  While a lot of it will be couched in political clouds, these types of initiatives – along with expanded use of natural gas, and renewables in the regular power mix – will actually reduce our emissions.  Already we are beating many of our targets, while Germany and many other Paris signers are struggling to reduce emissions.  And don’t think that progress will stop political attacks or legal actions against the Trump Administration or companies.
  6. Lawsuit Central – Understanding #4 & #5, it seems like more legal battles is a hardy perennial, but in 2018 legal challenges on the climate, regulations will again play a prominent role.  Unlike previous years when Republican AGs like now EPA head Scott Pruitt and WV’s Pat Morrisey led the charge, this year Democrat AGs in Blue states – buoyed by environmental activists – will lead efforts to file suits against the Trump Administration. Lawyers will be busy, including those inside EPA who are already prepping for each fight by being very careful in how they write new rules.
  7. HFC issues and the Kigali Amendment – The Kigali amendment was signed in late 2016 as part of the Montreal Protocol. Its aim is to reduce the hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in air conditioners and refrigerators.  Early in 2018, the big news will be whether the administration follows through on statements from late last year where they vowed to fund efforts to implement it and send the amendment to the Senate for a ratification vote.  The Treaty is binding and goes into effect in 2019 since many countries already have ratified it.  The agreement was supported by both industry, environmental and other sustainability groups, and holds China, India and others to binding limits as global AC and refrigerant use grows globally.
  8. Infrastructure – The most important word for 2018 is infrastructure.  Why? Because it is an election year and infrastructure sells in both parties.  The President is expected to unveil a long-awaited statement of infrastructure “principles” soon and some see the push as an opportunity to advance energy and water infrastructure investments. This means pipelines, transmission and other generation assets.  While the larger infrastructure debate will take on many shapes, energy will play a significant role in the form of new pipeline approvals to move new natural gas, export terminals to get it our resources to foreign markets and important generation assets like new nuclear projects, renewables and gas plants.
  9. Emerging Autonomous Vehicle Rules – Last year, autonomous vehicles began to emerge as a new, important issue.  As the technology and regulatory discussion continues and becomes more defined, there will be more details, innovations and exciting changes for 2018.  Our friends at SAFE have been among the leaders on this issue and have an Autonomous Vehicle Task Force with leading experts to help develop an action plan to facilitate the widespread deployment of this transformative technology.
  10. Electricity markets and the Perry plan – FERC faces an early January deadline (delayed from last month) to respond to the Energy Department’s request to propose a rule that would compensate nuclear and coal plants for resiliency. As our friends at Axios point out, it is a wonky, complex issue, but it remains a battle over nuclear and coal versus gas and renewables.  As natgas prices remain low (as expected for 2018), the market challenges for coal and nukes remain a potential problem.  With many political and energy sectors interests on both sides, it will be a key decision for going forward in 2018.

 

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“It’s a good context to revisit things like siting, permitting, certainly some of the export terminal issues.”

Rep. Kevin Cramer talking Infrastructure to POLITICO.

 

IN THE NEWS

EIA talking Year-end Oil – Last week,  the U.S. Energy Information Administration said that after decreasing nearly 20% in the first half of 2017, the spot energy index in the Standard and Poor’s (S&P) Goldman Sachs Commodity Index (GSCI) ended 2017 16% higher than the beginning of the year. Higher crude oil and petroleum product prices in the second half of 2017 were responsible for the increase in the S&P GSCI energy index.  EIA also reported that total U.S. production was slightly over 9.75 million barrels per day in the week ending December 22nd.  Our friends at Axios point out that this is actually 35,000 barrels per day less than the prior-week average, signaling the first weekly dip since Hurricane Nate took a bunch of Gulf of Mexico production temporarily offline in mid-October.

 

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Senate Returns, Jones, Smith Sworn in – The Senate returns for the second session of the 115th Congress on Wednesday when they will swear in new Alabama Sen. Doug Jones and Minnesota LG Tina Smith. Smith is replacing Sen. Franken who resigns today and Jones defeated Roy Moore to give Democrats a win to replace AG Jeff Sessions.  The House returns next Monday.

IN THE FUTURE

75th Annual Global Globes – Can’t wait for Seth Myers to host this one from January 7th from Hollywood.

API’s Annual State of Energy Address – On January 9th, API holds its annual State of Energy Address in the Atrium Ballroom of the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center.  The luncheon starts at 12:00 Noon with a CEO Jack Gerard’s speech at 12:30 p.m. and a reporter briefing at 1:15 p.m.

NY to Host CPP Meeting for EPA Comments – On January 9th, New York AG Eric Schneiderman holds a meeting to provide public comments to EPA on repealing the Clean Power Plan at The New School in NYC.  Schneiderman is calling it a “people’s hearing” 1) as if the residents and miners of WV are not people and 2) certainly most New Yorkers are just regular folks Like everyone else.  My guess it will be very entertaining but not all that valuable to EPA.

Wilson Forum to Look at Taiwan Energy Issues – The Woodrow Wilson Center holds a discussion on next Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. looking at the political and social, as well as economic ramifications of the options Taipei has to meet its expansive energy needs, and how its decisions may impact Taiwan’s foreign policy.

Hopper, Honorable to Headline WCEE Event – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) will hold a reception at Dentons on Tuesday January 9th at 6:00 p.m. to discuss lessons learned from political appointees.  The event features a lively discussion about the political appointment process in the energy and environmental fields and will feature a panel of former state and federal political appointees about how they started down the path towards political appointment and navigated the process.  Panelists will share their experiences and candid views about the challenges and rewards of a political appointment, as well as lessons they have learned while in these highly visible roles.  Speakers include SEIA’s Abby Hopper, former director of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; former FERC Commissioner Collette Honorable and Connecticut Consumer Counsel Elin Katz, who is President of the National Association of State Utility Advocates.

WRI Outlines Stories to Watch – On Wednesday, January 10th at 9:00 a.m., the World Resources Institute hosts in 15th annual Stories to Watch event.  The event is for policymakers, business leaders and media in Washington, DC, and around the world.  Dr. Andrew Steer, WRI President & CEO, will share his insights on the big stories in the environment and international development in the coming year. In this turbulent time, he will explore global trends and emerging issues related to economics, climate change, energy markets, forests, water, security issues and more.

CSIS to Host Moniz – On Thursday, January 11th at 4:00 p.m., CSIS holds a discussion with Ernest J. Moniz, the co-chair and CEO of NTI and former U.S. Secretary of Energy. He will provide remarks on the role of nuclear weapons in today’s increasingly dangerous global security environment, which will be followed by a discussion with John Hamre, president and CEO of CSIS.

Detroit Auto Show Launches – The North American International Auto Show runs from January 13th to 28th and serves as the global stage for companies to debut brand-defining vehicles and industry-shaping announcements.  Press Days start on January 14th where the world’s automotive and mobility leaders gather for three days of worldwide product and technology debuts.  Last January, the 2017 NAIAS featured 71 vehicle introductions, including 46 worldwide debuts. News coming out of NAIAS is heard across the globe as more than 5,100 journalists from 61 different countries annually attend to cover the latest and greatest happenings our industry has to offer.

BPC to Host LaFleur, Chatterjee – On Tuesday, January 16th at 10:00 a.m., the Bipartisan Policy Center hosts FERC Commissioners Neil Chatterjee and Cheryl LaFleur to discuss the proposed Grid Resiliency Pricing Rule. This proposal, drafted by the Department of Energy, calls for an expedited rulemaking to support generators that provide specific reliability and resiliency attributes. FERC is expected to take action on the proposal by January 10.

World Energy Outlook Set For Launch – On January 16th at 1:30 p.m., the CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a forum and the U.S. launch of the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2017. Fatih Birol, Executive Director of the IEA, will present the findings from the report.

WCEE to Look at 2018 Agenda – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) holds its  6th Annual WCEE Lunch & Learn Brainstorming Event on Tuesday January 23rd at Noon kicking off its Lunch & Learn planning, as well as deciding what topics to cover in 2018.

CSIS to Host Canada Energy Discussion – The CSIS Energy and National Security Program will host a presentation on January 23rd at 9:30 a.m. featuring the National Energy Board’s (NEB) Canada’s Energy Future 2017: Energy Supply and Demand Projections to 2040. This report, part of NEB’s annual Energy Future series, features long-term projections of Canadian energy supply and demand.  The 2017 edition examines how recent energy developments, especially in climate policy, have affected Canada’s energy outlook. The study also includes additional scenarios focusing on long-term climate policy and technology trends. Similar in structure to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Annual Energy Outlook, the report is the only public, long-term Canadian energy outlook that includes all energy commodities in all provinces and territories.

Pruitt, Snyder, Others Headline Washington Auto Show – The Washington Auto Show launches on January 23rd and runs through February 4th.  The Washington Auto Show is the Public Policy Show, where the auto industry intersects with the government officials who write and enforce the laws and rules that affect the field. This coming year, one of the focuses of the show will be on connected and autonomous vehicle technology, and the ways pending legislation could impact its development.  Major speakers include EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, Sen. Gary Peters, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, and many others, including representatives from the U.K., South Korea, Japan, China, and the U.A.E. Press Day is January 25th and will feature a sneak peek of the more than 600 cars on the floor of the consumer show.

Pruitt to Head to Senate Environment – The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt will appear before the Committee on Jan. 31st making his first return to the panel nearly a year after his confirmation.

National Ethanol Conference Set – The Renewable Fuels Association holds its 23rd annual National Ethanol Conference on February 12-14 in San Antonio.  Former Presidential Advisor Mary Matalin and veteran Democratic Political Strategist Donna Brazile are scheduled to speak together at the event on Washington Politics.

Energy Update: Week of 12/11

Friends,

It is Hanukkah week which begins on tomorrow night at sunset and ends next Wednesday.  Hanukkah is a Jewish Festival of Lights is celebrated for eight days and nights.  It commemorates the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire.

An info-packed “In the News” section this week after last week’s busy-ness.  It includes some reaction to the solar trade hearing, more on the Cruz-White House RFS meeting, a new view from EPA on the New Source review program, and finally an extension for 30 days (requested by new FERC Chair Kevin McIntyre) for FERC to consider the DOE resiliency proposal aimed at supporting coal-fired and nuclear power plants.

The big political news this week is the Alabama Senate race and the tax reform conference committee, which will meet publicly for the first time on Wednesday.  While tax negotiations continue behind the scenes, Congress is also going full bore on a spending deal to avoid a government shutdown before Christmas.

We still have a big week in the Energy space (hopefully our last before gliding into the holidays).  Tomorrow, the White House rolls out what we hear will be “the most aggressive” 5-year offshore drilling plan ever.  While we all look for the HUGE tweet, we remind that will can answer many of your questions about the impacts and possibilities.

Also tomorrow, House Energy panels hosts automakers and auto dealers to discuss fuel standard and CAFE’s relook.  Senate Energy looks at FERC/Interior permitting and we will see committee votes on EIA’s Linda Capuano, Interior assistant secretary Tim Petty and NOAA’s Barry Myers (Wed in Senate Commerce).

Also Wednesday, the House Energy Subcommittee looks at NAFTA with our friends’ Karen Harbert of the Chamber Global Energy Institute and APFM’s Chet Thompson among those testifying, and Senate Environment hosts NRC Commissions to discuss nuclear.

Speaking of NAFTA and energy, National Journal hosts a webinar on it Thursday and Friday at 10:00 a.m., the Bipartisan Policy Center will host FERC Chairman Neil Chatterjee for a sit down with BPC President Jason Grumet.

And then TAKE THE REST OF FRIDAY OFF AND GO SEE THE NEW STAR WARS MOVIE!!!!!

Finally, this morning, there are two interesting New York Times pieces worth reading: one is an internal look at Trump’s mindset and interactions from Maggie Haberman and Peter Baker which I found fascinating and informative; and the second looks at EPA’s enforcement and unfortunately picks up a usual theme backed by misleading stats.  In the second case, there is clearly a different (and just as reasonable) approach in this EPA which shouldn’t be a surprise to advocates or reporters. We are happy to discuss.

And in case you weren’t able to get there this morning at the Newseum, our friend and Axios Energy Reporter Amy Harder led a conversation on energy policies and priorities under President Trump with FERC’s Neil Chatterjee, Rep Paul Tonko and Heritage’s Nick Loris.  Check out the details…

Call with questions.  Best,

Frank Maisano

(202) 828-5864

  1. (202) 997-5932

THE LOBBY SHOP

The new episode of The Lobby Shop is live on iTunes, SoundCloud, and Google Play Music.  This week’s episode features Special Agent Tom O’Connor, President of the FBI Agents Association.  Tom discusses developments within the Bureau and FBIAA after Director Chris Wray’s nomination, how FBIAA is able to support active, retired, and deceased Special Agents and their families, and what issues are foremost in the minds of FBI personnel lately.  Since it is tax legislation season, we also have a bonus episode featuring PRG’s resident tax expert Liam Donovan on the latest in tax reform and what’s up next for the Conference Committee, final vote, and beyond. Tune in for a look behind the scenes and lots of seasonal analogies.

FRANKLY SPOKEN

“It makes no sense to effectively tax tens of thousands of good-paying U.S. jobs out of existence, solely to benefit the commercially unskilled Chinese and German owners of Suniva and SolarWorld, who will cut and run.”

Michael O’Sullivan, senior vice president of development at NextEra Energy.

IN THE NEWS

EPA Rolls Out Redefined NSR Focus in Memo – The EPA issued a memo on Friday saying the agency won’t “second guess” the analyses that companies have to conduct before construction projects on their plants to determine whether they might emit more pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. The well-constructed memo is the first step in a major initiative revise the New Source Review program, which governs permits for new or reconstructed plants’ emissions under the Clean Air Act.  The Supreme Court this morning declined to hear the major case involving EPA’s enforcement of the NSR program.  My Colleague Jeff Holmstead, a former EPA Air Office head is happy to discuss the details.

WSJ Blasts Ethanol – The Wall Street Journal Ed Board blasted the “hostage taking” over ethanol policy in an editorial last Thursday.  The piece discusses the back-and-forth over ethanol policy that first involved Corn State Senators blocking Trump EPA nominees, then oil state Senators pushing back by blocking Iowa-favored Ag nominees, including one that would clear a path for Sen. Grassley’s grandson to become Iowa’s Secretary of Agriculture.  The Journal says the “Senate hostage-taking is unfortunate, not least because it undermines the ability of the executive branch to govern. But this is what happens when politicians decide to favor certain industries like ethanol at the expense of others. The political and economic damage will grow as long as this policy continues.” It also adds that America’s independent refiners and manufacturers deserve at least as much consideration as the Trump Administration has given ethanol interests. WSJ: “The RINs regime has imperiled the jobs of many blue-collar union voters who swung for Mr. Trump in 2016.”

AEI Report Hits RFS – The American Enterprise Institute has a new report looking at policymaking lessons from the RFS, saying the RFS would be better as a rate standard than a volume standard.  AEI also adds that EPA should issue multi-year rules rather than annual rules in order to improve certainty and that uncertainty should be explicitly incorporated into future rulemakings.

EPA to Hold Additional CPP Hearings – EPA said it would hold additional public hearings on the repeal the Clean Power Plan.  The hearing will be in San Francisco, Gillette, WY and Kansas City. The hearing were added due to the “overwhelming response” to the recent hearing in Charleston.  Dates and locations of the meetings will be announced in the coming weeks.

Companies Roll Out Landmark Methane Effort – API rolled out a landmark partnership to accelerate improvements to environmental performance in operations across the country. Focused initially on reducing methane and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, the Environmental Partnership includes 26 natural gas and oil producers, who produce a significant portion of American energy resources. Participating companies will begin implementing the voluntary program starting January 1, 2018.  Collectively, at the time of launch, the participating companies represent operations in every major U.S. natural gas and oil basin. The Environmental Partnership is a historic agreement bringing together American natural gas and oil companies of all sizes to take action, learn and collaborate in an effort to further improve our environmental performance.

What Methane Program Will Address – The three Environmental Performance Programs include:

  1. Leak Program for Natural Gas and Oil Production Sources: Participants will implement monitoring and timely repair of fugitive emissions at selected sites utilizing detection methods and technologies such as Method 21 or Optical Gas Imaging cameras.
  2. Program to Replace, Remove or Retrofit High-Bleed Pneumatic Controllers: Participants will replace, remove or retrofit high-bleed pneumatic controllers with low-or zero-emitting devices.
  3. Program for Manual Liquids Unloading for Natural Gas Production Sources: Participants will minimize emissions associated with the removal of liquids that, as a well ages, can build up and restrict natural gas flow.

Who is in? – Participants at launch include: Anadarko, Apache, BHP, BP, Chesapeake Energy, Cabot Oil & Gas, Chevron, Cimarex Energy, ConocoPhillips, CrownQuest, Devon Energy, Encana, EOG Resources, Exxon Mobil subsidiary XTO Energy, Hess, Marathon Oil, Murphy Oil, Newfield, Noble Energy, Occidental Petroleum, Pioneer Natural Resources, Shell, Southwestern Energy, Statoil, TOTAL and Western Gas Partners.  To view more information about the program and companies’ commitments, visit www.TheEnvironmentalPartnership.org.

SAFE Looks at Expand EV Markets – Securing America’s Future Energy released its quarterly update to the Energy Security Fact Pack, a data-driven overview of the latest trends in energy security. The Fact Pack includes charts on domestic and global oil production and consumption patterns, oil market dynamics and prices, and up-to-date information on fuel efficiency and advanced fuel vehicles.  The latest Fact Pack highlights developments in the U.S. electric vehicle (EV) market, which is poised to see significant growth in the coming years as a result of new models, lower battery costs, increased range, and growing consumer awareness. Demand for EVs has continued to rise in 2017, setting new records for purchases and vehicle model availability. Although six models currently account for nearly two-thirds of sales, consumers have a fuller range of choices with 37 models available, thanks to marked declines in battery technology costs and enhanced range.  See the Charts.

SAFE, Mayors Support of Federal EV Tax Credit – Speaking of SAFE, it has worked in collaboration with the City of Atlanta to recruit 22 mayors from cities across the country to sign a joint letter in support of the federal electric vehicle (EV) tax credit. The mayors’ letter was sent to the appointed members of the conference committee following recent passage of the House and Senate tax reform legislation. It called for the preservation of the Section 30D Federal Plug-In Electric Drive Vehicle Tax Credit, which offers a $7,500 discount on purchase of a new electric vehicle.  SAFE’s Energy Security Leadership Council (ESLC), a coalition of CEOs and retired military leaders concerned with threats to America’s economic and national security through our continued oil dependence, have also express strong support of the EV tax credit citing it as a cornerstone to energy security policy.

Solar Growth Continues…. – The EIA said its latest monthly report shows that U.S. PV output in the first nine months of 2017 grew 47% over the same period in 2016, with market growth across the nation. PV represented 1.9% of total generation during this period. Every state in the U.S. increased its output from solar, from South Dakota, the only remaining state that did not generate more than 1,000 megawatt-hours (MWh) or one gigawatt-hour (GWh) in the nine month period, to perennial PV giant California.  California, with its 24.8 M mw, more than laps the field over next place Arizona, with 4.6M. However, as PV output growth across the U.S. accelerates, the Golden State’s share of PV generation, shrank from 48% in 2016 to 43% in 2017. Rounding out the top 10 generators are North Carolina, Nevada, New Jersey, Texas, Massachusetts, Georgia, Utah and Colorado. Of those top 10 states, Georgia had the highest year to year percentage growth, increasing 186% from 2016 to 2017, followed by Texas with 165% and Utah with 123%. Other states that made impressive percentage and quantity growth gains in the same time period are Minnesota, Idaho, Virginia, Alabama, South Carolina and Mississippi.

…But Trade Case Creates Worry – Folks are worried though about solar in the face of new potential tariffs.  More than 60 witnesses testified in a cramped conference room at USTR during a final eight-hour public hearing on the Section 201 trade case.  A new GTM Research report finds that the average fixed-tilt utility-scale solar price has since edged back above of DOE’s price target, amid market uncertainty surrounding the Section 201 solar trade case. The recent price increase stems from a rush to procure “tariff-free” solar panels over the summer with the potential for new tariffs looming. The National Electrical Contractors told the Hill that thousands of high-tech, high-skilled, and good-paying electrical contractors’ jobs are at risk.

Third Way Releases CCS Map – Third Way has a new map and database that is the most comprehensive tracking site for projects working to capture carbon emissions. Third Way says there are 100 carbon capture projects globally, with 51 in the United States. These projects can capture, store, and utilize emissions from power and bioenergy plants, industrial facilities, and even directly from the air. Some are innovative new concepts being developed by startups, and others have been operating at commercial scale for decades. One thing they have in common: we’ll likely need this full suite of technologies to meet international and domestic climate goals.

ACCF Paper Focuses on Regs – The American Council for Capital Formation released a paper by former OIRA head John Graham outlining 10 ideas for improving the regulatory process. It’s the product of a November 2016 roundtable with Sens. Mike Rounds, Angus King, James Lankford and others. Graham, who now heads Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, said the themes of this paper are increasing transparency at regulatory agencies, enhancing public, congressional and judicial oversight of agencies, stimulating retrospective review of old regulations, and ensuring evidential support for new regulations.

ON THE SCHEDULE THIS WEEK

Paris Forum to Focus on Anniversary – French President Macron will host the One Planet Summit tomorrow in Paris, on the two-year anniversary of the Paris Agreement. The Summit will focus specifically on climate finance. Heads of State will be invited to attend this meeting.

Nuclear Weapons Triad Forum Set – The Advanced Nuclear Weapons Alliance Deterrence Center (ANWA DC) will host the Inaugural morning forum on Capitol Hill tomorrow.  The event will feature key Members of Congress representing nuclear triad communities at Air Force and Naval bases, and NNSA sites, The group will also outline a series of 11 more 2018 forums and roundtables with key government officials, industry leaders and suppliers, and academic experts on the triad issues of the day, Each of these events will tackle the nuclear triad’s emerging issues and challenges, while sharing the successes, in the ongoing nuclear weapons enterprise modernization.

House Panels to Look at Fuel Standards, GHGs – The House Energy & Commerce panels on Environment and on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection will hold a joint hearing tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. to discuss updates on the Corporate Average Fuel Economy Program (CAFE) and GHG emissions standards for motor vehicles.  Witnesses include our friend and Montgomery, AL Honda/Acura dealer Forrest McConnell representing the National Automotive Dealers Assn.  Others include AAM’s Mitch Bainwol, Global Automakers John Bozzella and Dave Cooke of the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Senate Energy to Look FERC, Interior Permitting; Vote on Nominees – The Senate Energy Committee will hold a hearing tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. to examine the infrastructure permitting processes at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Department of the Interior.  Testifying will be Interior’s Jim Cason, FERC’s Terry Turpin and Janet Pfleegar of the Federal Permitting Improvement Steering Council, along with several others.  The Committee will also vote on nominations Linda Capuano to head the DOE’s Energy Information Administration and Tim Petty to be assistant secretary of the Interior Department before the hearing.

Senate Foreign Relations to Focus on European Security – The Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s Subcommittee on Europe and Regional Security Cooperation will hold a hearing tomorrow at 10:00 a.m. on European energy security focused on U.S. Interests and coercive Russian diplomacy.  Witnesses include the State Department’s Assistant Secretary of Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs Wess Mitchell and State’s Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Bureau of Energy Resource John McCarrick.

WH Infrastructure Aide Headlines Forum – The Hudson Institute will host an event tomorrow at Noon on the future of U.S. public transit systems keynoted by D.J. Gribbin, Special Assistant to the President for Infrastructure Policy. Following Gribbin’s remarks, David Horner will moderate a panel discussion featuring Maryland Secretary of Transportation Pete K. Rahn, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority General Manager and CEO Paul J. Wiedefeld, and Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority CEO Phillip A. Washington.

Resources Looks at Dependence on Foreign Metals, Minerals – The House Resources panel on Energy and Mineral Resources will hold an oversight hearing tomorrow at 2:00 p.m. on the consequences of relying on other countries for a growing number of metals and minerals.  Witnesses include DoD’s Ronnie Favors, USGS’s Murray Hitzman, RAND’s Richard Silberglitt, NMA’s Katie Sweeney and Havasupai Tribe Council member Carletta Tilousi.

Webinar to Look at Digital Grid – Utility Dive will hold a webinar tomorrow at 2:00 p.m. on discussion on how digital agility can help utilities improve operational excellence and deliver superior customer engagement and experience.  Speakers will include experts from MIT, PG&E and Siemens Digital Grid.  Key topics covered in the webinar will include adopting new grid modernization strategies, building new revenue streams, extreme weather and grid resilience among other issues.

Energy Storage Forum Set –The 3rd annual U.S. Energy Storage Summit will be held in San Francisco tomorrow and Wednesday at the Hilton Union Square.  The forum will bring together utilities, financiers, regulators, technology innovators, and storage practitioners for two full days of data-intensive presentations, analyst-led panel sessions with industry leaders, and extensive, high-level networking.  Speakers will Include APRA-E’s Susan Babinec, Peter Klauer of Cal ISO, Cal PUC Commissioner Carla Peterman, ESA CEO (and former MD PSC Chair) Kelly Speakes-Backman and our friends Shayle Kann of GTM Research, Stephen Lacey and Justin Gerdes of Greentech Media.

Forum Set to Look at NatGas – Tomorrow and Wednesday, the Energy Institute at Colorado State University (CSU) and Gas Technology Institute (GTI) will be co-hosting the CH4 Connections conference at CSU’s campus in Fort Collins. This conference, now in its fourth year, will focus on methane emissions quantification, mitigation, and capture for the natural gas industry, and will include a tour of the Methane Emissions Test and Evaluation Center (METEC) that will showcase the solutions under development and in field testing at the center.

House Energy Panel Looks at NAFTA, Energy – The House Energy & Commerce Subcommittee on Energy will hold a hearing on Wednesday at 10:15 a.m. in 2322 Rayburn on the impacts and future of North American energy trade and NAFTA.  Our friends Chamber Global Energy Institute head Karen Harbert and refiners Assn Head Chet Thompson will be among those testifying.  RFF’s Alan Krupnick and ABB’s Allen Burchett (repping NAM) will also join the panel.

Senate Environment Hosts NRC Commissioners – The Senate Environment Committee will hold a hearing on Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. to discuss oversight of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.  NRC Chairwoman Kristine Svinicki, Commissioner Jeff Baran and Commissioner Stephen Burns will testify.

Senate Commerce to Vote on NOAA Head – The Senate Commerce Committee is scheduled to vote Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. to approve President Trump’s choice of AccuWeather CEO Barry Myers to head the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

RFF Seminar to Look at CPP – Resources for the Future (RFF) will hold a seminar on Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. to explore the implications of social cost of carbon revisions for the Clean Power Plan itself and for potential future energy and climate policies.  RFF’s Alan Krupnick will reflect on the decision’s treatment of health benefits, and Harvard University’s Kathy Fallon Lambert will present new research on how repealing the Clean Power Plan would impact public health. RFF’s Dallas Burtraw will conclude the seminar with a discussion of how a revised “inside the fence line” approach to Clean Power Plan compliance might work.

House Science to Look at Solar Programs Focus – The House Science Committee is holding a hearing on Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. on advancing solar energy technology.  The hearing will look at research and deployment, while examining DOE’s efforts to shift solar energy funding toward early-stage research.  Witnesses include DOE’s EERE head Dan Simmons, NREL’s Martin Keller, Stanford University’s Steve Eglash and Kenny Stein of the Institute for Energy Research.

Energy Stakeholder Breakfast Set – The Advanced Energy Stakeholder Series continues on Thursday morning with an event supported by stakeholder member organizations across New York, Chicago, Denver, Washington D.C. and Boston.  The breakfast will focus on energy, mobility & transportation and will include Rachel Healy of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, Jigar Shah, PEPCO’s Robert Stewart, Marissa Gillett of the Maryland Public Service Commission and David Schatz of ChargePoint.

NJ to Host NAFTA WebinarNational Journal will host a webinar on Thursday at 11:00 a.m. to look at renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement.  In this webinar, speakers will examine NAFTA’s history, development, and future, and address the major players involved, each side’s key demands, the timeline, potential outcomes and the impact of President Trump’s rhetoric on the process.

Forum to Look at US-Mexico NatGas – The Latin American Dialogue hosts a panel discussion on Friday at 9:00 a.m. aimed at understanding the role of LNG for US energy exports and commercial ties in Latin America, as well as the US-Mexico energy relationship. As global energy trade grows and the United States looks to expand oil and gas exports, Latin American countries provide significant commercial opportunities for exporters and investors alike. It remains imperative that Latin American countries and the United States strive to find mutually beneficial opportunities in order to boost energy ties and expand energy cooperation.  Speakers include State’s Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Bureau of Energy Resources John McCarrick, Sempra’s Mark Nelson, Leslie Palti-Guzman of the Rapidan Group and several others.

BPC to Host FERC Chair – On Friday at 10:00 a.m., the Bipartisan Policy Center will host FERC Chairman Neil Chatterjee for a sit down with BPC President Jason Grumet to discuss the proposed Grid Resiliency Pricing Rule. This proposal, drafted by the Department of Energy, calls for an expedited rulemaking to support generators that provide specific reliability and resiliency services. The proposal calls on FERC to take action on the rulemaking by today.

NatGas Roundtable Panel to Discuss Energy Security – On Friday at 3:30 p.m. at the Mexican Cultural Institute, the Embassy of Mexico and the Natural Gas Roundtable of Washington will hold a panel session on natural gas and North American energy security. A Holiday Reception will follow at 4:30 p.m.

The Last Jedi Hits Theaters – MIDNIGHT, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15th

IN THE FUTURE

CSIS to Host World Coal Report – On December 18th at 3:30 p.m., CSIS will host the launch of the IEA’s new report analyzing coal’s recent trends and forecasting its demand, supply, and trade through 2022.  Coal remains world’s dominant fuel. Under pressure from decarbonization, cheaper alternatives, and geopolitical shifts in demand, coal continues to be one of the most pressing questions in energy. Peter Fraser, Head of Division for Gas, Coal, and Power Markets at the International Energy Agency, will present the IEA’s report.

API’s Annual State of Energy Address – On January 9th, API holds its annual State of Energy Address.

Hopper, Honorable to Headline WCEE Event – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) will hold a reception at Dentons on Tuesday January 9th at 6:00 p.m. to discuss lessons learned from political appointees.  The event features a lively discussion about the political appointment process in the energy and environmental fields and will feature a panel of former state and federal political appointees about how they started down the path towards political appointment and navigated the process.  Panelists will share their experiences and candid views about the challenges and rewards of a political appointment, as well as lessons they have learned while in these highly visible roles.  Speakers include SEIA’s Abby Hopper, former director of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; former FERC Commissioner Collette Honorable and Connecticut Consumer Counsel Elin Katz, who is President of the National Association of State Utility Advocates.

75th Annual Global Globes – Can’t wait for Seth Myers to host this one from January 7th from Hollywood.

World Energy Outlook Set For Launch – On January 16th at 1:30 p.m., the CSIS Energy & National Security Program will host a forum and the U.S. launch of the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2017. Fatih Birol, Executive Director of the IEA, will present the findings from the report.

WCEE to Look at 2018 Agenda – The Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment (WCEE) holds its  6th Annual WCEE Lunch & Learn Brainstorming Event on Tuesday January 23rd at Noon kicking off its Lunch & Learn planning, as well as deciding what topics to cover in 2018.

Pruitt to Head to Senate Environment – The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt will appear before the Committee on Jan. 31, 2018, making his first return to the panel nearly a year after his confirmation.