Scott Segal points to a photo of his "first political moment": meeting Lyndon B. Johnson in Texas in 1971.
Scott Segal points to a photo of his “first political moment”: meeting Lyndon B. Johnson in Texas in 1971.

PRG Founding Partner Scott Segal was featured this week in a Bloomberg Government interview and profile piece. The interview explores the top policy issues of 2016, strategies for good negotiation, and “why lobbying might be the most patriotic of all Washington careers.”

Here is Segal’s answer to the question, The word ‘lobbying’ is often used as a pejorative – do you think lobbyists deserve better?:

“Lobbying is the only exercise that’s protected three different times by the U.S. Constitution – and if you do communications work, four times.

“I think the Founding Fathers would be very surprised to learn that lobbying is something that is looked down upon. They would have thought that lobbying is foreseeable as the government grew in size and complexity. The Library of Congress was established on the notion that it would provide Congress with all the information it needed to make decisions. And it must have been obsolete in six months, because information is not static, it rolls based on innovation in the marketplace.

“The lobbyist is almost like the honeybee of the Washington community. We pick up the information and distribute it from location to location until everybody has it and can make decisions accordingly. I don’t find it a distasteful occupation; I find it an absolutely essential one for the operation of the government. Information needs are too complex, and need to be satisfied too quickly, to expect that it will all just happen by chance.”

To read the rest of Bloomberg Government’s interview with Scott Segal, click here.